The 390s decade ran from January 1, 390, to December 31, 399

Millennium: 1st millennium
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EventsEdit

390

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391Edit

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LiteratureEdit
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392Edit

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393Edit

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ChinaEdit

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394Edit

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EgyptEdit
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395Edit

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AgricultureEdit
Arts and SciencesEdit
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396Edit

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397Edit

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Roman EmpireEdit
  • Stilicho traps the Visigoths under King Alaric in the Peloponnese, but decides to abandon the campaign against the Visigoths in Greece, thus allowing King Alaric to escape north to Epirus with his loot. Presumably, Stilicho left Greece in order to prepare for military action in northern Africa, where a rebellion (see Gildonic Revolt in 398) seemed imminent.[4]
  • Emperor Honorius passes a law making barbarian styles of dress illegal in the city of Rome. As a result of this law, everybody in Rome is forbidden from wearing boots, trousers, animal skins, and long hair. This law is passed in response to the increasing popularity of barbarian fashions among the people of Rome.[5][6]
ChinaEdit

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398Edit

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Roman EmpireEdit
  • Gildonic Revolt: Gildo, a Berber serving as a high-ranking official (comes) in Mauretania, rebels against the Western Roman Empire. The Gildonic Revolt is instigated by a powerful official in the Eastern Roman Empire named Eutropius, who wishes to undermine his enemies in the Western Roman Empire by cutting off the grain supply to Rome.[7] After Gildo takes much of North Africa and cuts off the grain supply to Rome, Flavius Stilicho returns to Italy to raise troops against the rebels. After a short campaign in the desert, he defeats Gildo. Gildo flees and commits suicide by hanging himself.
  • Eutropius, Roman general (magister militum), celebrates his victory over the Huns ("the wolves of the North") in a parade through Constantinople (see 395).
  • An imperial edict obliges Roman landowners with plantations to yield 1/3 of their fields to the "barbarians" who have been settled in the Roman Empire.
  • Emperor Honorius marries Stilicho's daughter Maria.
  • Possible date for the Second Pictish War.

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399Edit

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  • November 26Pope Siricius dies at Rome after a 15-year reign in which he has commanded celibacy for priests, asserted papal authority over the entire Western Church, and threatened to impose sanctions on those who do not follow his dictates.
  • Anastasius I succeeds Siricius as the 39th pope. He seeks to reconcile the churches of Rome and Antioch. Anastasius also condemns the doctrine of Origen.
  • Flavian I is acknowledged as legitimate bishop of Antioch by the Church of Rome.

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

390

391

392

393

394

396

397

398

399

DeathsEdit

390

391

392

393

394

395

396

397

398

399


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  2. ^ "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  3. ^ "Bona, Algeria". World Digital Library. 1899. Retrieved 2013-09-25.
  4. ^ Burrell, Emma (2004). "A Re-Examination of Why Stilicho Abandoned His Pursuit of Alaric in 397". Historia: Zeitschrift für Alte Geschichte. 53 (2): 251–256. JSTOR 4436726.
  5. ^ Aldrete, Gregory S.; Aldrete, Alicia (2019-02-07). The Long Shadow of Antiquity: What Have the Greeks and Romans Done for Us?. Bloomsbury Publishing. ISBN 978-1-350-10052-7.
  6. ^ Elton, Hugh (1996). "Fravitta and Barbarian Career Opportunities in Constantinople". Medieval Prosopography. 17 (1): 95–106. ISSN 0198-9405. JSTOR 44946209.
  7. ^ Charles, Michael (2005). "Transporting the Troops in Late Antiquity: Naves Onerariae, Claudian and the Gildonic War". The Classical Journal. 100 (3): 275–299. ISSN 0009-8353. JSTOR 4133022.