2017 World Rally Championship-2

2017 FIA World Rally Championship-2
Previous: 2016 Next: 2018
Parent series:
World Rally Championship
Support series:
World Rally Championship-3
Junior World Rally Championship

The 2017 FIA World Rally Championship-2 is the fifth season of the World Rally Championship-2, an auto racing championship recognised by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile, running in support of the World Rally Championship. It was created when the Group R class of rally car was introduced in 2013. The Championship is open to cars complying with R4, R5, and Super 2000 regulations.[1] Esapekka Lappi did not return to defend his 2016 title as left Škoda Motorsport for the top WRC category to become third driver of Toyota GAZOO Racing. However Škoda Motorsport retained the title thanks to Pontus Tidemand who won the championship after Rallye Deutschland.[2]

CalendarEdit

 
Nations that hosted a rally in 2017 are highlighted in green, with rally headquarters marked by a red dot.

The season was contested over thirteen rounds in Europe, North America, South America and Oceania.[3][4]

Round Dates Rally name Rally headquarters Rally details
Start Finish Surface Stages Distance
1 19 January 22 January   Monte Carlo Rally Gap, Hautes-Alpes Mixed[N 1] 15[N 2] 355.96 km
2 9 February 12 February   Rally Sweden Torsby, Värmland Snow 17[N 3] 305.83 km
3 9 March 12 March   Rally Mexico León, Guanajuato Gravel 17[N 4] 231.25 km
4 7 April 9 April   Tour de Corse Bastia, Haute-Corse Tarmac 10 316.76 km
5 27 April 30 April   Rally Argentina Villa Carlos Paz, Córdoba Gravel 18 356.49 km
6 18 May 21 May   Rally de Portugal Matosinhos, Porto Gravel 19 349.17 km
7 8 June 11 June   Rally Italia Sardegna Alghero, Sardinia Gravel 19 312.66 km
8 29 June 2 July   Rally Poland Mikołajki, Warmia-Masuria Gravel 22[N 5] 338.34 km
9 27 July 30 July   Rally Finland Jyväskylä, Keski-Suomi Gravel 25 315.62 km
10 17 August 20 August   Rallye Deutschland Saarbrücken, Saarland Tarmac 21 309.17 km
11 6 October 8 October   Rally Catalunya Salou, Tarragona Mixed[N 6] 19 312.02 km
12 26 October 29 October   Wales Rally GB Deeside, Flintshire Gravel 20 306.13 km
13 17 November 19 November   Rally Australia Coffs Harbour, New South Wales Gravel 19[N 7] 287.68 km
Source:[3][4][13][14]

Calendar changesEdit

The FIA re-organised the calendar for the 2017 season to include a greater variation in surfaces between events, bringing the Tour de Corse forward from October to April.[3][15] The decision was made after concerns were expressed about the 2016 calendar, which originally contained six consecutive gravel events followed by four tarmac rallies.[16]

The Rally of China was removed from the calendar.[4] The event had been included on the 2016 calendar before storm damage to the proposed route forced its cancellation.[16] The round was removed from the 2017 calendar to give event organisers more time to prepare for a future bid to rejoin the calendar.[17] Similarly, the FIA put the Rallies of Argentina and Poland on notice regarding safety concerns, threatening to rescind their World Championship status for the 2017 season unless safety standards were improved in 2016,[18][19][20] with drivers citing a lack of safety marshalls and expressing concerns over spectators getting too close to the cars as the main areas to be addressed.[21] Both events were subsequently included on the calendar.[3][4]

The Rallies of Sweden and Germany changed their headquarters. The Rally of Sweden stayed within Värmland County, but relocated from Karlstad to Torsby.[3] The Rally of Germany moved from Trier in Rhineland-Palatine to Saarbrücken in the neighbouring state of Saarland.[14]

Route changesEdit

The Rallye Monte-Carlo introduced a heavily revised itinerary, with eighty-five percent of the route used in 2016 being revised for the 2017 event,[22] which saw the competitive distance increase from 337.59 km to 382.65 km and included the Col de Turini as part of the Power Stage.[22] Rally Sweden adjusted its route to remove the emphasis on purpose-built stages that had filled out the event itinerary in previous years. The new route raised the average speed of the rally and introduced more competitive mileage in Hedmark County in neighbouring Norway.[23]

Rally Mexico also featured route revisions, with the eighty-kilometre Guanajuato stage—the longest in the championship in 2016—removed from the schedule;[24] however, the addition of new stages and further changes to existing ones meant that the overall competitive distance of the 2017 rally was only six kilometres shorter than the route used in the 2016 event. The rally started in Mexico City with a spectator-friendly stage before moving to its traditional headquarters in León.[25] The Tour de Corse shortened its route by seventy-four kilometres, from 390.92 km in 2016 down to 316.76 km in 2017, with most of the changes coming from shortening each of the individual stages used in 2016.[26] Rally Portugal shortened its route by twenty kilometres, reintroducing stages that had not been used for several years and reconfiguring stages from the 2016 event.[27] Rally Poland also revised its route, introducing a series of brand-new stages close to the Russian border. The changes saw the crews compete on a wider ranges of surfaces—including tarmac and cobblestones—within individual stages, although the rally was still officially classified as a gravel surface event.[28]

Following the cancellation of stages in Rally Sweden when the front-running cars exceeded the maximum average speed mandated by the FIA,[8] Rally Finland was forced to revise its route to find ways of keeping the average stage speed down—with some estimates predicting that the 2017 generation of cars could exceed 140 km/h (87.0 mph)—to avoid stage cancellations.[29] This was achieved by installing artificial chicanes into all but two of the stages, which proved to be controversial as drivers complained that they were too narrow and thus had the potential to damage cars, and were poorly-positioned with little regulatory oversight from rally organisers.[30] With Rallye Deutschland moving to a new headquarters, the rally routed was revised. The vineyard and military proving ground stages in the Baumholder region were retained, but the final leg of the route was changed to introduce high-speed stages based on country lanes.[14]

Rally Catalunya introduced several new and returning stages to its route, focusing on the tarmac legs of the event.[31] Organisers of the Wales Rally GB retained the event route used in 2016, but revised the itinerary to increase its difficulty, with the route featuring earlier start times, later finishes and the reintroduction of night stages.[32] Rally Australia underwent route revisions, introducing a new loop of stages north of the rally headquarters in Coffs Harbour. The new stages were designed to be faster and more technical than in previous events.[33]


Teams and driversEdit

Crews that are eligible for the World Rally Championship-2 title
Entrant Car Class Tyre Drivers Co-drivers Rounds
  ACI Team Italia Hyundai i20 R5 R5 M   Fabio Andolfi   Manuel Fenoli 4, 6–10
  Simone Scattolin 11–12
  CHL Sport Auto Citroën DS3 R5 R5 M   Yoann Bonato   Benjamin Boulloud 1, 4, 6, 8, 10–12
  Emil Bergkvist Citroën DS3 R5 R5 M   Emil Bergkvist   Joakim Sjöberg 1–2, 4, 6
  Ola Fløene 10, 12
  Gekon Racing Citroën DS3 R5 R5 M   Simone Tempestini   Giovanni Bernacchini 4, 6, 8–12
  Gus Greensmith Ford Fiesta R5 R5 M   Gus Greensmith   Craig Parry 2, 6, 8–12
  Pierre-Louis Loubet Citroën DS3 R5 R5 M   Pierre-Louis Loubet   Vincent Landais 2, 4
Ford Fiesta R5 6–7, 9–10, 12
  Motorsport Italia SRL Škoda Fabia R5 R5 D   Benito Guerra   Borja Rozada 3, 12
M   Daniel Cué 5–6, 8, 10–11
  M-Sport World Rally Team Ford Fiesta R5 R5 M   Eric Camilli   Benjamin Veillas 1–4, 6, 10, 12
  Teemu Suninen   Mikko Markkula 2, 4, 6, 10–12
  Škoda Motorsport Škoda Fabia R5 R5 M   Pontus Tidemand   Jonas Andersson 2–3, 5–6, 10, 12
  Škoda Motorsport II Škoda Fabia R5 8
  TRT Peugeot World Rally Team Peugeot 208 T16 R5 R5 M   Łukasz Pieniążek   Przemysław Mazur 4, 6–8, 10–11
  Printsport Škoda Fabia R5 12
Source:[34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42][43][44][45]
Key
Icon Class
R4 Classification
within Group R
R5
S Super 2000
Crews that are ineligible for the World Rally Championship-2 title
Entrant Car Class Tyre Drivers Co-drivers Rounds
  Gemini Clinic Rally Team Ford Fiesta R5 R5 M   Bryan Bouffier   Denis Giraudet 1, 4
  Rhys Yates   Alex Lee 11–12
  Quentin Gilbert Ford Fiesta R5 R5 M   Quentin Gilbert   Renaud Jamoul 1
Škoda Fabia R5 D 6, 8–10
  Škoda Motorsport Škoda Fabia R5 R5 M   Andreas Mikkelsen   Anders Jæger 1, 4, 6
  Ole Christian Veiby   Stig Rune Skjærmoen 12
  Jan Kopecký   Pavel Dresler 1, 4, 10
  Škoda Motorsport II 7, 11
  Juuso Nordgren   Tapio Suominen 11–12
  TGS Worldwide   Mikael Korhonen 9
  Andrea Crugnola Ford Fiesta R5 R5 D   Andrea Crugnola   Michele Ferrara 1
  BRC Racing Team Ford Fiesta R5 R5 M   Giandomenico Basso   Simone Scattolin 1
  BRR Baumschlager Rally & Rally Team Škoda Fabia R5 R5 D   Armin Kremer   Pirmin Winklhofer 1
M   Marijan Griebel   Stefan Kopczyk 10
  Quentin Giordano Peugeot 208 T16 R5 R5 M   Quentin Giordano   Thomas Roux 1
  Printsport Škoda Fabia R5 R5 M   Ole Christian Veiby   Stig Rune Skjærmoen 2, 4, 7–8
  Jari Huttunen   Antti Linnaketo 9
  Adapta Motorsport AS Ford Fiesta R5 R5 P   Eyvind Brynildsen   Anders Fredriksson 2
D 12
M   Mads Østberg   Emil Axelsson 10
Škoda Fabia R5   Bernhard ten Brinke   Davy Thierie 10
Hyundai i20 R5 D   Tom Cave   James Morgan 9
  Styllex Motorsport Ford Fiesta R5 12
Škoda Fabia R5 M   Martin Koči   Lukáš Kostka 4
  Edwin Schilt   Lisette Bakker 10
  Anders Grøndal Ford Fiesta R5 R5 P   Anders Grøndal   Roger Eilertsen 2
  C-Rally Ford Fiesta R5 R5 M   Jarosław Koltun   Ireneusz Pleskot 2, 8
  Matthew Wilson   Stuart Loudon 12
  Alexey Lukyanuk Ford Fiesta R5 R5 M   Alexey Lukyanuk   Alexey Arnautov 2
  Tommi Mäkinen Racing Ford Fiesta R5 R5 M   Takamoto Katsuta   Marko Salminen 2, 6–7, 9, 11
  Hiroki Arai   Glenn MacNeall 2, 6–7, 9, 11
  Pedro Heller Ford Fiesta R5 R5 M   Pedro Heller   Pablo Olmos 3, 5–6, 8, 12
  Orlen Team Škoda Fabia R5 R5 M   Hubert Ptaszek   Maciek Szczepaniak 3, 5–6, 8
  Yohan Rossel Citroën DS3 R5 R5 M   Yohan Rossel   Benoît Fulcrand 4, 6–7, 10–11
  Laurent Pellier Citroën DS3 R5 R5 M   Laurent Pellier   Benoit Neyret Gigot 4
  Gustavo Saba Škoda Fabia R5 R5 D   Gustavo Saba   Fernando Mussano 5
  Juan Carlos Alonso Škoda Fabia R5 R5 D   Juan Carlos Alonso   Matias Mercadal 5
Ford Fiesta R5 M   Cristian García   Pablo Marcos 11
  Drive DMACK Trophy Team Ford Fiesta R5 R5 D   Max Vatanen   Jacques-Julien Renucci 6, 12
  Osian Pryce   Dale Furniss 8–9
  Jon Armstrong   Noel O'Sullivan 10–11
  Miguel Campos Škoda Fabia R5 R5 M   Miguel Campos   António Costa 6
  Wojciech Chuchała Ford Fiesta R5 R5 P   Wojciech Chuchała   Sebastian Rozwadowski 8
Škoda Fabia R5 D   David Bogie   Kevin Rae 12
  Tehase Auto Škoda Fabia R5 R5 M   Raul Jeets   Kuldar Sikk 8, 12
  Raul Jeets 9
  S.A. Motorsport Italia Srl Škoda Fabia R5 R5 M   Umberto Scandola   Michele Ferrara 9
  Toksport World Rally Team Škoda Fabia R5 R5 D   Orhan Avcioglu   Burcin Korkmaz 11
  Orhan Avcioglu Ford Fiesta R5 12
  Matt Edwards Ford Fiesta R5 R5 D   Matt Edwards   Patrick Walsh 12
  Kalle Rovanperä Ford Fiesta R5 R5 M   Kalle Rovanperä   Jonne Halttunen 12–13
Source:[34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42][43][44][45]
Key
Icon Class
R4 Classification
within Group R
R5
S Super 2000

Regulation changesEdit

Sporting regulationsEdit

  • The format of the series will change to include three events nominated by the FIA that will be compulsory for all crews competing for points.[15] This represents a change from previous years, where competitors were free to enter as many rounds of the championship as they wished, nominating individual rounds to count as their points-scoring events. The change was introduced to address concerns over the potential for an anticlimactic championship, where the championship could be resolved without the leading crews directly competing against one another.[15] The Rallies of Portugal, Germany and Great Britain are the compulsory events for 2017.

Season reportEdit

The championship started with Andreas Mikkelsen, in a one-off outing with Škoda Motorsport after losing his WRC drive because of the Volkswagen Motorsport withdrawal from the sport, winning the Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo by more than 3 minutes from teammate Jan Kopecký. Mikkelsen won 10 out of 15 stages, and led from start to end. The podium was completed by Monte veteran and previous winner Bryan Bouffier. Eric Camilli finished fourth in his first outing with the M-Sport World Rally Team after being demoted from the team's WRC drivers line up.[46]

Ole Christian Veiby was the early leader of the Rally Sweden, winning the first two stages of the rally, but a push by Pontus Tidemand in which he won five of the remaining six stages of the leg 1,[47] made him the Leader of the rally, a position he would maintain for the rest of the legs. Tidemand's victory give Škoda Motorsport the second victory of the season in a row. The Podium was completed by M-Sport World Rally Team's Teemu Suninen and Veiby.[48]

Rally Mexico was a two-way fight between Camilli and Tidemand. By the end of Leg 2, Tidemand was on top by just 2 seconds. Nevertheless, Camilli choose wet tires for the last leg, and could not match the times of Tidemand, thus the Sweden won his second rally in a row, and give Škoda Motorsport the third out of three win in the season. The podium was completed by local and former Production World Rally Champion Benito Guerra.[49]

Andreas Mikkelsen returned to the Škoda Motorsport's team for the Tour de Corse, and dominated the event, leading from start to finish. Teemu Suninen finished second, taking the position after his teammate Eric Camilli hit trouble in the first leg. The podium was completed by local Yohan Rossel. Mikkelsen's win was his second in as many outings.[50]

Pontus Tidemand won the Rally Argentina by more than 10 minutes from local Juan Carlos Alonso to continue Škoda Motorsport's winning streak. Tidemand found a trouble-free weekend in one of the roughest events of the year were only five WRC-2 Crews finished the event. Benito Guerra completed the podium.[51]

Mikkelsen returned for the Rally de Portugal and looked set to take another dominant win, only to roll his car on the very last stage of the rally whilst holding a 3 minute lead. This subsequently handed Tidemand his fourth win from six rallies, with the podium being completed by Teemu Suninen and reigning Junior WRC champion Simone Tempestini.

Results and standingsEdit

Season summaryEdit

Round Event name Winning driver Winning co-driver Winning entry Winning car Winning time Report
1   Rallye Monte Carlo    Andreas Mikkelsen   Anders Jæger   Škoda Motorsport Škoda Fabia R5 4:09:36.3 Report
2   Rally Sweden    Pontus Tidemand   Jonas Andersson   Škoda Motorsport Škoda Fabia R5 2:45:14.7 Report
3   Rally Mexico   Pontus Tidemand   Jonas Andersson   Škoda Motorsport Škoda Fabia R5 3:32:56.5 Report
4   Tour de Corse   Andreas Mikkelsen   Anders Jæger   Škoda Motorsport Škoda Fabia R5 3:31:04.1 Report
5   Rally Argentina   Pontus Tidemand   Jonas Andersson   Škoda Motorsport Škoda Fabia R5 3:55:42.7 Report
6   Rally de Portugal   Pontus Tidemand   Jonas Andersson   Škoda Motorsport Škoda Fabia R5 3:54:17.6 Report
7   Rally Italia Sardegna   Jan Kopecký   Pavel Dresler   Škoda Motorsport II Škoda Fabia R5 3:36:36.5 Report
8   Rally Poland   Ole Christian Veiby   Stig Rune Skjærmoen   Printsport Škoda Fabia R5 2:53:39.3 Report
9   Rally Finland   Jari Huttunen   Antti Linnaketo   Printsport Škoda Fabia R5 2:39:30.9 Report
10   Rallye Deutschland   Eric Camilli   Benjamin Veillas   M-Sport World Rally Team Ford Fiesta R5 3:08:16.0 Report
11   Rally Catalunya   Teemu Suninen   Mikko Markkula   M-Sport World Rally Team Ford Fiesta R5 3:09:43.8 Report
12   Wales Rally GB   Pontus Tidemand   Jonas Andersson   Škoda Motorsport Škoda Fabia R5 3:07:12.2 Report
13   Rally Australia   Kalle Rovanperä   Jonne Halttunen   Kalle Rovanperä Ford Fiesta R5 Report

FIA World Rally Championship-2 for DriversEdit

Points are awarded to the top ten classified finishers.

Position  1st   2nd   3rd   4th   5th   6th   7th   8th   9th   10th 
Points 25 18 15 12 10 8 6 4 2 1
Pos. Driver MON
 
SWE
 
MEX
 
FRA
 
ARG
 
POR
 
ITA
 
POL
 
FIN
 
GER
 
ESP
 
GBR
 
AUS
 
Drops Points
1   Pontus Tidemand 1 1 1 1 2 3 1 15 143
2   Eric Camilli 4 4 2 8 7 1 2 4 91
3   Teemu Suninen 2 2 2 7 1 13 0 85
4   Jan Kopecký 2 7 1 2 2 0 85
5   Ole Christian Veiby 3 5 2 1 WD DNS 16 68
6   Benito Guerra 3 3 11 4 9 3 WD 0 59
7   Simone Tempestini 4 3 10 5 6 5 20 0 56
8   Quentin Gilbert 5 Ret 3 2 4 0 55
9   Andreas Mikkelsen 1 1 Ret 0 50
10   Pierre-Louis Loubet Ret 6 10 5 7 5 8 0 39
11   Gus Greensmith 5 6 7 8 Ret 13 6 0 36
12   Tom Cave 3 3 0 30
13   Łukasz Pieniążek 10 5 6 11 12 6 9 0 29
14   Yohan Rossel 3 16 4 15 WD 0 27
15   Kalle Rovanperä 15 1 0 25
16   Jari Huttunen 1 0 25
17   Juuso Nordgren 9 4 5 0 24
18   Emil Bergkvist 6 6 9 Ret 10 Ret 0 19
19   Juan Carlos Alonso 2 0 18
20   Pedro Heller 4 Ret 8 9 18 0 18
21   Takamoto Katsuta 9 12 3 Ret 14 0 17
22   Bryan Bouffier 3 Ret 0 15
23   Osian Pryce Ret 4 0 12
24   Gustavo Saba 4 0 12
25   Miguel Campos 4 0 12
26   David Bogie 4 0 12
27   Hubert Ptaszek Ret 5 9 Ret 0 12
28   Yoann Bonato Ret Ret 15 5 13 10 11 0 11
29   Raul Jeets Ret 6 12 0 8
30   Wojciech Chuchała 6 0 8
31   Hiroki Arai 7 Ret Ret Ret Ret 0 6
32   Andrea Crugnola 7 0 6
33   Cristian García 7 0 6
34   Matt Edwards 7 0 6
35   Fabio Andolfi WD 13 Ret 8 Ret WD 12 10 0 5
36   Orhan Avcioglu 8 14 0 4
37   Eyvind Brynildsen 8 Ret 0 4
38   Marijan Griebel 8 4
39   Jon Armstrong 14 9 0 2
40   Jarosław Kołtun 10 Ret 0 1
41   Umberto Scandola 10 0 1
Pos. Driver MON
 
SWE
 
MEX
 
FRA
 
ARG
 
POR
 
ITA
 
POL
 
FIN
 
GER
 
ESP
 
GBR
 
AUS
 
Drops Points
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)

FIA World Rally Championship-2 for Co-DriversEdit

Pos. Co-driver MON
 
SWE
 
MEX
 
FRA
 
ARG
 
POR
 
ITA
 
POL
 
FIN
 
GER
 
ESP
 
GBR
 
AUS
 
Drops Points
1   Jonas Andersson 1 1 1 1 2 3 1 15 143
2   Benjamin Veillas 4 4 2 8 7 1 2 4 91
3   Mikko Markkula 2 2 2 7 1 13 0 85
4   Pavel Dresler 2 7 1 2 2 0 85
5   Stig Rune Skjærmoen 3 5 2 1 WD 16 0 68
6   Giovanni Bernacchini 4 3 10 5 6 5 20 0 56
7   Renaud Jamoul 5 Ret 3 2 4 0 55
8   Anders Jæger 1 1 Ret 0 50
9   Daniel Cué 3 11 4 9 3 0 44
10   Vincent Landais Ret 6 10 5 7 5 8 0 39
11   Craig Parry 5 6 7 8 Ret 13 6 0 36
12   James Morgan 3 3 0 30
13   Przemysław Mazur 10 5 6 12 12 6 9 0 29
14   Benoît Fulcrand 3 16 4 15 WD 0 27
15   Jonne Halttunen 15 1 0 25
16   Antti Linnaketo 1 0 25
17   Tapio Suominen 4 5 0 22
18   Matias Mercadal 2 0 18
19   Pablo Olmos 4 Ret 8 9 18 0 18
20   Joakim Sjöberg 6 6 9 Ret 0 18
21   Marko Salminen 9 12 3 Ret 14 0 17
22   Denis Giraudet 3 Ret 0 15
23   Borja Rozada 3 WD 0 15
24   Dale Furniss Ret 4 0 12
25   Fernando Mussano 4 0 12
26   António Costa 4 0 12
27   Kevin Rae 4 0 12
28   Maciej Szczepaniak Ret 5 9 Ret 0 12
29   Benjamin Boulloud Ret Ret 15 5 13 10 11 0 11
30   Kuldar Sikk Ret 6 12 0 8
31   Sebastian Rozwadowski 6 0 8
32   Michele Ferrara 7 10 0 7
33   Glenn MacNeall 7 Ret Ret Ret Ret 0 6
34   Pablo Marcos 7 0 6
35   Patrick Walsh 7 0 6
36   Manuel Fenoli WD 13 Ret 8 Ret WD 0 4
37   Burcin Korkmaz 8 14 0 4
38   Anders Fredriksson 8 Ret 0 4
39   Noel O'Sullivan 14 9 0 2
40   Mikael Korhonen 9 0 2
41   Simone Scattolin 12 10 0 1
42   Ireneusz Pleskot 10 Ret 0 1
43   Ola Fløene 10 Ret 0 1
Pos. Co-driver MON
 
SWE
 
MEX
 
FRA
 
ARG
 
POR
 
ITA
 
POL
 
FIN
 
GER
 
ESP
 
GBR
 
AUS
 
Drops Points
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)

FIA World Rally Championship-2 for TeamsEdit

Pos. Team MON
 
SWE
 
MEX
 
FRA
 
ARG
 
POR
 
ITA
 
POL
 
FIN
 
GER
 
ESP
 
GBR
 
AUS
 
Points
1   Škoda Motorsport 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 193
2   M-Sport World Rally Team 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 155
3   Printsport 3 4 2 1 1 5 105
4   Motorsport Italia SRL WD 3 2 6 3 5 3 WD 81
5   Gekon Racing 3 3 5 4 3 4 10 80
6   Škoda Motorsport II 1 2 2 4 73
7   TRT Peugeot World Rally Team 5 4 4 6 7 5 58
8   Adapta Motorsport AS 5 2 6 Ret 36
9   Drive DMACK Trophy Team 7 Ret 3 8 7 WD 31
10   Tommi Mäkinen Racing 4 9 3 Ret 10 30
11   ACI Team Italia WD 8 Ret 4 Ret WD 9 6 26
12   Orlen Team Ret 3 5 Ret 25
13   Gemini Clinic Rally Team 2 Ret 8 9 24
14   Styllex Motorsport Ret Ret 3 15
15   BRR Baumschlager Rally & Rally Team Ret 4 12
16   C-Rally 6 Ret 8 12
17   TGS Worldwide 5 10
18   S.A. Motorsport Italia Srl 6 8
19   Toksport World Rally Team 6 8
20   Tehase Auto Ret 7 6
Pos. Team MON
 
SWE
 
MEX
 
FRA
 
ARG
 
POR
 
ITA
 
POL
 
FIN
 
GER
 
ESP
 
GBR
 
AUS
 
Points
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Rallye Monte Carlo was run on a tarmac and snow surface.
  2. ^ Rallye Monte Carlo was shortened when the first stage was cancelled due to a fatal accident involving a spectator.[5][6] The sixteenth stage was later cancelled owing to overcrowding of spectators.[7]
  3. ^ Rally Sweden was shortened when the second pass over the Knon stage was cancelled on the advice of the FIA as the leading drivers exceeded the maximum average stage speed of 130 km/h (80.8 mph) during the first run through the stage.[8]
  4. ^ Rally Mexico had its route shortened when a highway accident prevented the cars being transported to León in time for the start of the first stages.[9]
  5. ^ The sixth stage of Rally Poland was cancelled after heavy rains in the region created large puddles of standing water on the stage which was subsequently deemed too dangerous.[10]
  6. ^ Rally Catalunya was run on a tarmac and gravel surface.
  7. ^ Rally Australia had its route shortened after a bridge in the Newry stage was found to be damaged, making the second pass over the stage impossible to complete.[11] The penultimate stage, Pilbara Reverse 2, was also cancelled after heavy rain made conditions unsafe.[12]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2016 FIA World Rally Championship Sporting Regulations". fia.com. Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. 9 December 2015. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  2. ^ "Tidemand Clinches Title". fia.com. Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. 20 August 2017. Retrieved 8 October 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d e "2017 WRC dates confirmed". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 28 September 2016. Retrieved 29 September 2016.
  4. ^ a b c d "FIA Announces World Motorsport Council Decisions". FIA.com. Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. 30 November 2016. Retrieved 1 December 2016.
  5. ^ Benyon, Jack; Evans, David (19 January 2017). "Hayden Paddon crash halts Monte Carlo Rally's opening stage". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  6. ^ "Spectator dies in tragic start to Monte Carlo Rally". speedcafe.com. 20 January 2017. Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  7. ^ "Sebastien Ogier lands first victory of new WRC era". speedcafe.com. 22 January 2017. Retrieved 22 January 2017.
  8. ^ a b Benyon, Jack (11 February 2017). "Rally Sweden stage cancelled due to high speed of 2017 WRC cars". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 11 February 2017.
  9. ^ "WRC stars left carless in Mexico". speedcafe.com. 11 March 2017. Retrieved 11 March 2017.
  10. ^ "Rally Poland — Day 1". 2017 World Rally Championship season. July 2017. WRC Promoter GmbH.
  11. ^ "Neuville in command after stage cancellation". Speedcafe. 18 November 2017. Retrieved 18 November 2017.
  12. ^ Howard, Tom (19 November 2017). "Heavy rain cancels penultimate Rally Aus stage". Speedcafe. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  13. ^ Evans, David; Beer, Matt (28 September 2016). "World Rally Championship only confirms partial 2017 calendar". autosport.com. Haymarket Publications. Retrieved 29 September 2016.
  14. ^ a b c Evans, David (17 August 2017). "WRC crews say new Rally Germany route 'really boring'". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 17 August 2017.
  15. ^ a b c Evans, David (20 September 2016). "Tour of Corsica set to get April slot in 2017 WRC schedule". autosport.com. Haymarket Publications. Retrieved 21 September 2016.
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