Men's pole vault world record progression

The first world record in the men's pole vault was recognized by the International Association of Athletics Federations in 1912.[1]

As of June 21, 2009, 71 world records have been ratified by the IAAF (now World Athletics) in the event. Since 2000, World Athletics makes no distinction between indoor and outdoor settings when establishing pole vault world records. This new rule was not applied retroactively. The introduction in the early 1950s of flexible vaulting poles made from composites such as fiberglass or carbon fiber allowed vaulters to achieve greater height.[1][2][3]

Record progressionEdit

Ratified
Not ratified
Ratified but later rescinded
Pending ratification
Mark Athlete Nation Venue Date #[4]
4.02 m (13 ft 2+14 in) Marc Wright   United States Cambridge, U.S. June 8, 1912[1] 1
4.09 m (13 ft 5 in) Frank Foss   United States Antwerp, Belgium August 20, 1920[1] 1
4.12 m (13 ft 6 in) Charles Hoff   Norway Copenhagen, Denmark September 22, 1922[1] 1
4.21 m (13 ft 9+12 in) Charles Hoff   Norway Copenhagen, Denmark July 22, 1923[1] 2
4.23 m (13 ft 10+12 in) Charles Hoff   Norway Oslo, Norway August 13, 1925[1] 3
4.25 m (13 ft 11+14 in) Charles Hoff   Norway Turku, Finland September 27, 1925[1] 4
4.27 m (14 ft 0 in) Sabin Carr   United States Philadelphia, U.S. May 28, 1927[1] 1
4.30 m (14 ft 1+14 in) Lee Barnes   United States Fresno, U.S. April 28, 1928[1] 1
4.37 m (14 ft 4 in) William Graber   United States Palo Alto, U.S. July 16, 1932[1] 1
4.39 m (14 ft 4+34 in) Keith Brown   United States Boston, U.S. June 1, 1935[1] 1
4.43 m (14 ft 6+14 in) George Varoff   United States Princeton, New Jersey, U.S. July 4, 1936[1] 1
4.54 m (14 ft 10+12 in) Bill Sefton   United States Los Angeles, U.S. May 29, 1937[1] 1
4.54 m (14 ft 10+12 in) Earle Meadows   United States Los Angeles, U.S. May 29, 1937[1] 1
4.60 m (15 ft 1 in) Cornelius Warmerdam   United States Fresno, U.S. June 29, 1940[1] 1
4.72 m (15 ft 5+34 in) Cornelius Warmerdam   United States Compton, U.S. June 26, 1941[1] 2
4.77 m (15 ft 7+34 in) Cornelius Warmerdam   United States Modesto, U.S. May 23, 1942[1] 3
4.78 m (15 ft 8 in) Robert Gutowski   United States Palo Alto, U.S. April 27, 1957[1] 1
4.80 m (15 ft 8+34 in) Don Bragg   United States Palo Alto, U.S. July 2, 1960[1] 1
4.83 m (15 ft 10 in) George Davies   United States Boulder, U.S. May 20, 1961[1] 1
4.89 m (16 ft 12 in) John Uelses   United States Santa Barbara, U.S. March 31, 1962[1] 1
4.93 m (16 ft 2 in) Dave Tork   United States Walnut, U.S. April 28, 1962[1] 1
4.94 m (16 ft 2+14 in) Pentti Nikula   Finland Kauhava, Finland June 22, 1962[1] 1
5.00 m (16 ft 4+34 in) Brian Sternberg   United States Philadelphia, U.S. April 27, 1963[1] 1
5.08 m (16 ft 8 in) Brian Sternberg   United States Compton, U.S. June 7, 1963[1] 2
5.13 m (16 ft 9+34 in) John Pennel   United States London, England August 5, 1963[1] 1
5.20 m (17 ft 12 in) John Pennel   United States Coral Gables, U.S. August 24, 1963[1] 2
5.23 m (17 ft 1+34 in) Fred Hansen   United States San Diego, U.S. June 13, 1964[1] 1
5.28 m (17 ft 3+34 in) Fred Hansen   United States Los Angeles, U.S. July 25, 1964[1] 2
5.32 m (17 ft 5+14 in) Bob Seagren   United States Fresno, U.S. May 14, 1966[1] 1
5.34 m (17 ft 6 in) John Pennel   United States Los Angeles, U.S. July 23, 1966[1] 3
5.36 m (17 ft 7 in) Bob Seagren   United States San Diego, U.S. June 10, 1967[1] 2
5.38 m (17 ft 7+34 in) Paul Wilson   United States Bakersfield, U.S. June 23, 1967[1] 1
5.41 m (17 ft 8+34 in) A Bob Seagren   United States Echo Summit, U.S. September 12, 1968[1] 3
5.44 m (17 ft 10 in) John Pennel   United States Sacramento, U.S. June 21, 1969[1] 4
5.45 m (17 ft 10+12 in) Wolfgang Nordwig   East Germany Berlin, Germany June 17, 1970[1] 1
5.46 m (17 ft 10+34 in) Wolfgang Nordwig   East Germany Turin, Italy September 3, 1970[1] 2
5.49 m (18 ft 0 in) Christos Papanikolaou   Greece Athens, Greece October 24, 1970[1] 1
5.51 m (18 ft 34 in) Kjell Isaksson   Sweden Austin, U.S. April 8, 1972[1] 1
5.54 m (18 ft 2 in) Kjell Isaksson   Sweden Los Angeles, U.S. April 15, 1972[1] 2
5.55 m (18 ft 2+12 in) Kjell Isaksson   Sweden Helsingborg, Sweden June 12, 1972[1] 3
5.63 m (18 ft 5+12 in) Bob Seagren   United States Eugene, U.S. July 2, 1972[1] 4
5.65 m (18 ft 6+14 in) David Roberts   United States Gainesville, U.S. March 28, 1975[1] 1
5.67 m (18 ft 7 in) Earl Bell   United States Wichita, U.S. May 29, 1976[1] 1
5.70 m (18 ft 8+14 in) David Roberts   United States Eugene, U.S. June 22, 1976[1] 2
5.72 m (18 ft 9 in) Władysław Kozakiewicz   Poland Milan, Italy May 11, 1980[1] 1
5.75 m (18 ft 10+14 in) Thierry Vigneron   France Paris, France June 1, 1980[1] 1
5.75 m (18 ft 10+14 in) Thierry Vigneron   France Lille, France June 29, 1980[1] 2
5.77 m (18 ft 11 in) Philippe Houvion   France Paris, France July 17, 1980[1] 1
5.78 m (18 ft 11+12 in) Władysław Kozakiewicz   Poland Moscow, Soviet Union July 30, 1980[1] 2
5.80 m (19 ft 14 in) Thierry Vigneron   France Mâcon, France June 20, 1981[1] 3
5.81 m (19 ft 12 in) Vladimir Polyakov   Soviet Union Tbilisi, Soviet Union June 26, 1981[1] 1
5.82 m (19 ft 1 in) Pierre Quinon   France Cologne, Germany August 28, 1983[1] 1
5.83 m (19 ft 1+12 in) Thierry Vigneron   France Rome, Italy September 1, 1983[1] 4
5.85 m (19 ft 2+14 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union Bratislava, Czechoslovakia May 26, 1984[1] 1
5.88 m (19 ft 3+14 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union Paris, France June 2, 1984[1] 2
5.90 m (19 ft 4+14 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union London, England July 13, 1984[1] 3
5.91 m (19 ft 4+12 in) Thierry Vigneron   France Rome, Italy August 31, 1984[1] 5
5.94 m (19 ft 5+34 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union Rome, Italy August 31, 1984[1] 4
6.00 m (19 ft 8 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union Paris, France July 13, 1985[1] 5
6.01 m (19 ft 8+12 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union Moscow, Soviet Union July 8, 1986[1] 6
6.03 m (19 ft 9+14 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union Prague, Czechoslovakia June 23, 1987[1] 7
6.05 m (19 ft 10 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union Bratislava, Czechoslovakia June 9, 1988[1] 8
6.06 m (19 ft 10+12 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union Nice, France July 10, 1988[1] 9
6.07 m (19 ft 10+34 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union Shizuoka, Japan May 6, 1991[1] 10
6.08 m (19 ft 11+14 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union Moscow, Soviet Union June 9, 1991[1] 11
6.09 m (19 ft 11+34 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union Formia, Italy July 8, 1991[1] 12
6.10 m (20 ft 0 in) Serhiy Bubka   Soviet Union Malmö, Sweden August 5, 1991[1] 13
6.11 m (20 ft 12 in) Serhiy Bubka   Ukraine Dijon, France June 13, 1992[1] 14
6.12 m (20 ft 34 in) Serhiy Bubka   Ukraine Padua, Italy August 30, 1992[1] 15
6.13 m (20 ft 1+14 in) Serhiy Bubka   Ukraine Tokyo, Japan September 19, 1992[1] 16
6.14 m (20 ft 1+12 in) A[5] Serhiy Bubka   Ukraine Sestriere, Italy July 31, 1994[1] 17
6.16 m (20 ft 2+12 in) i[6] Renaud Lavillenie   France Donetsk, Ukraine February 15, 2014 1
6.17 m (20 ft 2+34 in) i Armand Duplantis   Sweden Toruń, Poland February 8, 2020 1
6.18 m (20 ft 3+14 in) i Armand Duplantis   Sweden Glasgow, UK February 15, 2020 2
6.19 m (20 ft 3+12 in) i Armand Duplantis   Sweden Belgrade, Serbia March 7, 2022 3
6.20 m (20 ft 4 in) i Armand Duplantis   Sweden Belgrade, Serbia March 20, 2022 4
6.21 m (20 ft 4+14 in) Armand Duplantis   Sweden Eugene, Oregon, U.S. July 24, 2022 5

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu "12th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Berlin 2009" (PDF). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2009. pp. Pages 546, 555–6. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 29, 2011. Retrieved August 5, 2009.
  2. ^ "Man who broke 15 feet defends fiberglass pole". Ocala Star-Banner. (Florida). Associated Press. February 7, 1962. p. 10.
  3. ^ "World record progression in pole vault". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). (table). May 23, 1963. p. 3D.
  4. ^ The numbered occurrence of the athlete breaking the world record, in other words "#7" would indicate the 7th time the athlete broke the world record.
  5. ^ "From 2000, IAAF Rule 260.18s (formerly 260.6.a) was amended to say world records (as opposed to indoor world records) can be set in a facility 'with or without a roof.' So far, only one event - the women's pole vault - has been affected by this change, which was not applied retrospectively.""Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-06-29. Retrieved 2009-08-05.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) (p.546) Sergey Bubka set an indoor record of 6.15 m (20 ft 2 in) on February 21, 1993, in excess of the outdoor record, before this rule came into effect. Lavillenie's indoor world record was set after the rule came into effect, and thus since it exceeded Bubka's 6.14 m (20 ft 1+12 in) set outdoors, it also became the world record, the first indoor mark to do so in this event.
  6. ^ "Progression of IAAF World Records — 2015 edition" (pdf). Monte Carlo: IAAF. 2015. pp. 163–171. Retrieved 16 August 2016.

External linksEdit