2008 United States presidential election in Mississippi

The 2008 United States presidential election in Mississippi took place on November 4, 2008, and was part of the 2008 United States presidential election. Voters chose 6 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

2008 United States presidential election in Mississippi
Flag of Mississippi (2001–2020).svg
← 2004 November 4, 2008 2012 →
  John McCain official portrait 2009.jpg Obama portrait crop.jpg
Nominee John McCain Barack Obama
Party Republican Democratic
Home state Arizona Illinois
Running mate Sarah Palin Joe Biden
Electoral vote 6 0
Popular vote 724,597 554,662
Percentage 56.17% 43.00%

Mississippi presidential election results 2008.svg
County Results

President before election

George W. Bush
Republican

Elected President

Barack Obama
Democratic

Mississippi was won by Republican nominee John McCain with a 13.2% margin of victory. Prior to the election, all 17 news organizations considered this a state McCain would win, or otherwise considered as a safe red state. Although the state has the largest African American percentage in the country, Mississippi remains a safe red state at the presidential level, having voted Republican every election year since 1980. While there was comparably high African American turnout compared to previous elections in Mississippi, it was not enough to overcome the state's strong Republican leanings.

PrimariesEdit

CampaignEdit

PredictionsEdit

There were 16 news organizations who made state-by-state predictions of the election. Here are their last predictions before election day:

PollingEdit

McCain won every single pre-election poll, each with at least 50% of the vote with the exception of the one of them. The final 3 polls average gave the Republican a lead of 51% to 39%.[14]

FundraisingEdit

John McCain raised a total of $1,386,749 in the state. Barack Obama raised $768,981.[15]

Advertising and visitsEdit

Obama spent $238,401. McCain and his interest groups spent $139,999.[16] The McCain ticket visited three times. Obama's ticket visited the state once.[17]

AnalysisEdit

Mississippi is one of the most racially polarized states in presidential elections. African Americans uniformly vote Democratic while Caucasians vote Republican nearly as uniformly. In 2004, 14% of Caucasians voted for John Kerry and 10% of African Americans voted for Bush, according to exit polling.[18]

White Democrats began splitting their tickets in national elections as early as the 1940s when the national party became more friendly to the Civil Rights Movement, culminating when Barry Goldwater carried the state with a staggering 87 percent of the vote in 1964. The Republican trend accelerated in the late 1970s with the rise of the religious right. The last Democratic presidential nominee to win Mississippi was Jimmy Carter in 1976, even then, he only won it by 1.9 points. Due to its status as a safe red state, little campaigning took place in Mississippi by either of the two major party candidates. Indeed, the state was last seriously contested in 1980.

In 2008, Barack Obama was able to improve on Kerry's performance by six percent, mainly due to the higher African American turnout. Obama's main support was in the western delta counties next to the Mississippi River. In contrast, McCain's margins came from the regions bordering the Gulf Coast, the northeast Appalachian area and the Jackson and Memphis suburbs. Voting became even more polarized: nine in ten whites voted Republican, and nearly all blacks voted Democratic in Mississippi, according to exit polls.[18] As expected, McCain carried the Magnolia State by a comfortable 13.18-point margin over Obama. McCain's margin of victory, however, was less than that of George W. Bush's 19.69-point margin of victory over John Kerry in 2004.

Mississippi was also the only state to list the official candidates of the Reform Party on their ballot.[19]

At the same time, incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Thad Cochran was reelected with 61.44% of the vote over Democrat Erik Fleming who received 38.56%. Appointed U.S. Senator Roger Wicker stood for election as well in 2008 against former Democratic Governor Ronnie Musgrove. The race was expected to be much closer, but the Republicans ran ads accusing Musgrove of supporting gay rights, not a popular position in this strongly socially conservative state. Wicker defeated Musgrove by almost 10 points, 54.96%-45.04%.

ResultsEdit

2008 United States presidential election in Mississippi[20]
Party Candidate Running mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Republican John McCain Sarah Palin 724,597 56.17% 6
Democratic Barack Obama Joe Biden 554,662 43.00% 0
Independent Ralph Nader Matt Gonzalez 4,011 0.31% 0
Constitution Chuck Baldwin Darrell Castle 2,551 0.20% 0
Libertarian Bob Barr Wayne Allyn Root 2,529 0.20% 0
Green Cynthia McKinney Rosa Clemente 1,034 0.08% 0
Reform Ted Weill Frank McEnulty 481 0.04% 0
Write-ins Write-ins 74 0.01% 0
Totals 1,289,939 100.00% 6
Voter turnout (Voting age population) 61.2%

Results breakdownEdit

By countyEdit

County Obama% Obama# McCain% McCain# Others% Others# Total
Adams 58.52% 7,630 40.65% 5,300 0.84% 109 13,039
Alcorn 27.01% 3,701 71.18% 9,752 1.80% 247 13,700
Amite 43.74% 3,320 55.51% 4,214 0.75% 57 7,591
Attala 41.50% 3,739 57.82% 5,209 0.68% 61 9,009
Benton 47.98% 2,224 50.25% 2,329 1.77% 82 4,635
Bolivar 67.10% 9,471 31.79% 4,487 1.11% 156 14,114
Calhoun 35.28% 2,242 64.01% 4,068 0.71% 45 6,355
Carroll 34.13% 2,027 65.43% 3,886 0.44% 26 5,939
Chickasaw 50.27% 4,053 48.80% 3,934 0.93% 75 8,062
Choctaw 35.34% 1,459 63.57% 2,624 1.09% 45 4,128
Claiborne 84.46% 3,561 14.99% 632 0.55% 23 4,216
Clarke 36.59% 2,727 62.78% 4,679 0.63% 47 7,453
Clay 58.91% 6,424 40.46% 4,412 0.62% 68 10,904
Coahoma 73.10% 6,947 26.33% 2,502 0.57% 54 9,503
Copiah 53.00% 7,640 46.36% 6,683 0.63% 91 14,414
Covington 40.64% 3,826 58.45% 5,503 0.91% 86 9,415
DeSoto 30.46% 19,265 68.79% 43,510 0.75% 474 63,249
Forrest 42.75% 11,622 56.27% 15,296 0.98% 266 27,184
Franklin 36.94% 1,722 62.13% 2,896 0.92% 43 4,661
George 16.35% 1,398 82.45% 7,050 1.20% 103 8,551
Greene 23.56% 1,362 75.37% 4,358 1.07% 62 5,782
Grenada 44.33% 4,995 55.16% 6,215 0.51% 58 11,268
Hancock 21.19% 3,195 77.03% 11,614 1.78% 268 15,077
Harrison 36.57% 22,175 62.56% 37,927 0.87% 527 60,629
Hinds 69.82% 68,794 29.62% 29,187 0.56% 552 98,533
Holmes 81.58% 6,945 17.67% 1,504 0.75% 64 8,513
Humphreys 71.41% 3,180 27.91% 1,243 0.67% 30 4,453
Issaquena 61.38% 523 37.79% 322 0.82% 7 852
Itawamba 20.66% 1,938 77.17% 7,240 2.17% 204 9,382
Jackson 31.69% 15,534 67.24% 32,959 1.06% 522 49,015
Jasper 54.68% 4,476 44.71% 3,660 0.61% 50 8,186
Jefferson 86.96% 3,295 11.88% 450 1.16% 44 3,789
Jefferson Davis 60.55% 3,924 38.76% 2,512 0.69% 45 6,481
Jones 29.87% 8,089 69.14% 18,726 1.00% 270 27,085
Kemper 62.49% 2,876 36.81% 1,694 0.70% 32 4,602
Lafayette 43.32% 7,997 55.68% 10,278 1.00% 185 18,460
Lamar 21.42% 4,694 77.42% 16,969 1.16% 254 21,917
Lauderdale 40.00% 13,048 59.38% 19,368 0.61% 200 32,616
Lawrence 36.50% 2,513 62.73% 4,318 0.77% 53 6,884
Leake 43.90% 3,575 55.37% 4,509 0.74% 60 8,144
Lee 34.20% 11,769 65.09% 22,403 0.71% 245 34,417
Leflore 68.14% 8,914 31.38% 4,105 0.47% 62 13,081
Lincoln 33.56% 5,505 65.73% 10,781 0.71% 116 16,402
Lowndes 48.01% 13,110 51.03% 13,934 0.96% 262 27,306
Madison 41.89% 18,034 57.56% 24,781 0.55% 235 43,050
Marion 33.64% 3,764 65.68% 7,350 0.68% 76 11,190
Marshall 58.61% 9,573 40.72% 6,650 0.67% 110 16,333
Monroe 40.91% 7,137 58.27% 10,165 0.82% 143 17,445
Montgomery 45.67% 2,244 53.68% 2,638 0.65% 32 4,914
Neshoba 26.19% 2,584 73.01% 7,205 0.80% 79 9,868
Newton 32.38% 3,063 67.00% 6,338 0.61% 58 9,459
Noxubee 76.33% 4,970 23.15% 1,507 0.52% 34 6,511
Oktibbeha 49.63% 9,326 49.60% 9,320 0.78% 146 18,792
Panola 52.34% 8,370 47.00% 7,515 0.66% 106 15,991
Pearl River 18.52% 3,727 80.28% 16,156 1.20% 242 20,125
Perry 27.04% 1,521 71.82% 4,040 1.14% 64 5,625
Pike 51.25% 7,958 47.92% 7,441 0.82% 128 15,527
Pontotoc 23.12% 2,951 75.64% 9,656 1.25% 159 12,766
Prentiss 27.60% 3,020 70.39% 7,703 2.02% 221 10,944
Quitman 67.20% 2,797 32.05% 1,334 0.74% 31 4,162
Rankin 22.79% 14,235 76.27% 47,645 0.95% 591 62,471
Scott 42.90% 4,709 56.53% 6,205 0.56% 62 10,976
Sharkey 68.31% 1,722 31.10% 784 0.60% 15 2,521
Simpson 39.21% 4,393 59.44% 6,660 1.36% 152 11,205
Smith 23.94% 1,821 75.12% 5,715 0.95% 72 7,608
Stone 26.83% 1,746 71.62% 4,661 1.55% 101 6,508
Sunflower 70.40% 7,158 28.52% 2,900 1.08% 110 10,168
Tallahatchie 59.45% 3,646 39.70% 2,435 0.85% 52 6,133
Tate 39.02% 4,951 60.21% 7,639 0.76% 97 12,687
Tippah 26.50% 2,514 71.76% 6,809 1.74% 165 9,488
Tishomingo 23.26% 1,941 74.24% 6,195 2.49% 208 8,344
Tunica 76.42% 2,917 22.64% 864 0.94% 36 3,817
Union 24.42% 2,727 74.34% 8,302 1.24% 138 11,167
Walthall 44.22% 3,421 54.86% 4,244 0.92% 71 7,736
Warren 48.53% 9,502 50.84% 9,953 0.63% 123 19,578
Washington 66.94% 12,884 32.60% 6,274 0.46% 88 19,246
Wayne 38.69% 3,860 60.69% 6,056 0.62% 62 9,978
Webster 24.51% 1,321 74.82% 4,032 0.67% 36 5,389
Wilkinson 68.60% 3,498 30.52% 1,556 0.88% 45 5,099
Winston 45.38% 4,606 53.92% 5,473 0.70% 71 10,150
Yalobusha 45.95% 3,104 53.35% 3,604 0.70% 47 6,755
Yazoo 57.16% 5,725 42.13% 4,219 0.71% 71 10,015

By congressional districtEdit

John McCain carried three of the state’s four congressional districts, including two districts held by Democrats.

District McCain Obama Representative
1st 61.28% 37.74% Roger Wicker (110th Congress)
Travis Childers (111th Congress)
2nd 33.57% 65.86% Bennie Thompson
3rd 61.08% 38.17% Chip Pickering (110th Congress)
Gregg Harper (111th Congress)
4th 67.27% 31.76% Gene Taylor

ElectorsEdit

Technically the voters of Mississippi cast their ballots for electors: representatives to the Electoral College. Mississippi is allocated 6 electors because it has 4 congressional districts and 2 senators. All candidates who appear on the ballot or qualify to receive write-in votes must submit a list of 6 electors, who pledge to vote for their candidate and his or her running mate. Whoever wins the majority of votes in the state is awarded all 6 electoral votes. Their chosen electors then vote for president and vice president. Although electors are pledged to their candidate and running mate, they are not obligated to vote for them.[21] An elector who votes for someone other than his or her candidate is known as a faithless elector.

The electors of each state and the District of Columbia met on December 15, 2008, to cast their votes for president and vice president. The Electoral College itself never meets as one body. Instead the electors from each state and the District of Columbia met in their respective capitols.

The following were the members of the Electoral College from the state. All 6 were pledged to John McCain and Sarah Palin:[22]

  1. Jim Barksdale
  2. Barry Bridgforth
  3. Fred Carl
  4. Bobby Chain
  5. Charles Doty
  6. Victor Mavar

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "D.C.'s Political Report: The complete source for campaign summaries". Archived from the original on 2009-01-01. Retrieved 2009-12-20.
  2. ^ Presidential | The Cook Political Report Archived May 5, 2015, at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Vote 2008 - The Takeaway - Track the Electoral College vote predictions Archived April 22, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ Electoral-vote.com: President, Senate, House Updated Daily
  5. ^ a b c d Based on Takeaway
  6. ^ POLITICO's 2008 Swing State Map - POLITICO.com
  7. ^ RealClearPolitics - Electoral Map
  8. ^ CQ Politics | CQ Presidential Election Maps, 2008 Archived October 29, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ "Electoral College Map". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-05-26.
  10. ^ "October – 2008 – CNN Political Ticker - CNN.com Blogs". CNN. Retrieved 2010-05-26.
  11. ^ "Winning the Electoral College". Fox News. 2010-04-27.
  12. ^ roadto270
  13. ^ Election 2008: Electoral College Update - Rasmussen Reports™
  14. ^ Election 2008 Polls - Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections
  15. ^ "Presidential Campaign Finance". Archived from the original on 2009-03-24. Retrieved 2009-08-19.
  16. ^ "Map: Campaign Ad Spending - Election Center 2008 from CNN.com". CNN. Retrieved 2010-05-26.
  17. ^ "Map: Campaign Candidate Visits - Election Center 2008 from CNN.com". CNN. Retrieved 2010-05-26.
  18. ^ a b "CNN Election 2004". CNN. Retrieved 2009-04-06.
  19. ^ http://reformpa.web.aplus.net/news.htm[permanent dead link]
  20. ^ "Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Retrieved 2013-01-13.
  21. ^ "Electoral College". California Secretary of State. Archived from the original on October 30, 2008. Retrieved 2008-11-01.
  22. ^ http://www.sos.state.ms.us/elections/2008/PDF/PRESIDENTIAL%20ELECTORS2.pdf

See alsoEdit