Noxubee County, Mississippi

Noxubee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, its population was 11,545.[1] Its county seat is Macon.[2] The name is derived from the Choctaw word nakshobi meaning "to stink".[3]

Noxubee County
Noxubee County courthouse in Macon
Noxubee County courthouse in Macon
Map of Mississippi highlighting Noxubee County
Location within the U.S. state of Mississippi
Map of the United States highlighting Mississippi
Mississippi's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 33°07′N 88°34′W / 33.11°N 88.57°W / 33.11; -88.57
Country United States
State Mississippi
Founded1833
SeatMacon
Largest cityMacon
Area
 • Total700 sq mi (2,000 km2)
 • Land695 sq mi (1,800 km2)
 • Water4.8 sq mi (12 km2)  0.7%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total11,545
 • Estimate 
(2018)
10,535
 • Density16/sq mi (6.4/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district3rd

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 700 square miles (1,800 km2), of which 4.8 square miles (12 km2) (0.7%) is covered by water.[4]

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

National protected areaEdit

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
18409,975
185016,29963.4%
186020,66726.8%
187020,9051.2%
188029,87442.9%
189027,338−8.5%
190030,84612.8%
191028,503−7.6%
192023,710−16.8%
193025,5607.8%
194025,6690.4%
195020,022−22.0%
196016,826−16.0%
197014,288−15.1%
198013,212−7.5%
199012,604−4.6%
200012,548−0.4%
201011,545−8.0%
2018 (est.)10,535[5]−8.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2013[1]

2020 censusEdit

Noxubee County Racial Composition[10]
Race Num. Perc.
White 2,639 25.66%
Black or African American 7,190 69.91%
Native American 13 0.13%
Asian 14 0.14%
Other/mixed 257 2.5%
Hispanic or Latino 172 1.67%

As of the 2020 United States Census, 10,285 people, 3,986 households, and 2,592 families were residing in the county.

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, 11,545 people lived in the county; 71.6% were African American, 27.1% White, 0.2% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 0.4% of some other race, and 0.5% of two or more races, and 0.8% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race).

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[11] of 2000, 12,548 people, 4,470 households, and 3,222 families were living in the county. The population density was 18 people per square mile (7/km2). The 5,228 housing units had an average density of 8 per square mile (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 69.30% Black, 29.49% White, 0.15% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.37% from other races, and 0.58% from two or more races. About 1.12% of the population were Hispanics or Latinos of any race.

Of the 4,470 households, 35.8% had children under 18 living with them, 43.0% were married couples living together, 24.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.9% were not families. About 25.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 or older. The average household size was 2.77, and the average family size was 3.36.

In the county, the age distribution was 30.7% under 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 19.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.8% who were 65 or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.50 males. For every 100 females 18 and over, there were 84.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $22,330, and for a family was $27,312. Males had a median income of $25,008 versus $17,636 for females. The per capita income for the county was $12,018. About 29.20% of families and 32.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 43.60% of those under age 18 and 25.30% of those age 65 or over.


PoliticsEdit

United States presidential election results for Noxubee County, Mississippi[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 1,240 23.23% 4,040 75.67% 59 1.11%
2016 1,200 21.53% 4,347 77.99% 27 0.48%
2012 1,325 21.15% 4,920 78.54% 19 0.30%
2008 1,525 23.14% 5,030 76.34% 34 0.52%
2004 1,723 28.26% 4,346 71.28% 28 0.46%
2000 1,530 30.88% 3,383 68.29% 41 0.83%
1996 1,287 29.94% 2,801 65.17% 210 4.89%
1992 1,623 32.22% 3,188 63.29% 226 4.49%
1988 1,870 40.38% 2,722 58.78% 39 0.84%
1984 2,123 41.23% 2,928 56.87% 98 1.90%
1980 1,970 35.46% 3,434 61.82% 151 2.72%
1976 1,860 44.97% 2,121 51.28% 155 3.75%
1972 2,239 66.28% 1,052 31.14% 87 2.58%
1968 232 6.34% 1,387 37.91% 2,040 55.75%
1964 1,980 96.59% 70 3.41% 0 0.00%
1960 342 22.97% 277 18.60% 870 58.43%
1956 257 19.47% 690 52.27% 373 28.26%
1952 887 53.92% 758 46.08% 0 0.00%
1948 17 1.52% 74 6.60% 1,031 91.89%
1944 103 9.39% 994 90.61% 0 0.00%
1940 51 4.24% 1,152 95.76% 0 0.00%
1936 27 1.99% 1,332 97.94% 1 0.07%
1932 41 3.74% 1,052 95.99% 3 0.27%
1928 102 8.13% 1,153 91.87% 0 0.00%
1924 44 4.36% 966 95.64% 0 0.00%
1920 24 3.31% 701 96.56% 1 0.14%
1916 10 1.49% 656 98.06% 3 0.45%
1912 5 0.75% 646 97.00% 15 2.25%

Noxubee County is solidly Democratic in modern presidential elections, having last voted for the Republican presidential candidate in 1972.[13] Ironically, however, in the 1964 election it gave 96.6% of the vote to Republican Barry Goldwater, a total no candidate of either party has surpassed in any county in any subsequent presidential election. This was likely because this was the last election before the Voting Rights Act enfranchised the African-American majority in Noxubee County, and the white minority fiercely opposed the pro-civil rights President Johnson.[citation needed]

EducationEdit

Public elementary and secondary education is administered by the Noxubee County School District, which includes the entire county.[14]

Noxubee County is within the service area of the East Mississippi Community College system.[15] The system offers classes in the Macon Extension at Noxubee County High School in Macon.[16]

At one time, many more schools existed within the county. In the early 20th century, 19 of these were consolidated into two districts consisting of six schools, which were Salem, Lynn Creek, Center Point, Cliftonville, Cooksville-Paulette, Mashulaville, and Brooksville. The old Salem School was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1989.[17] The Noxubee County Agricultural School at Mashulaville opened in 1910 and included a 40-acre farm and provided living arrangements for up to 40 boarding students.[18]

The public school population is 1% White, compared to 27% of the county population.[19] Central Academy in Macon, which was founded in 1968 as a segregation academy,[20] closed in 2017. In 1982, private deals that had been made between board members to use public funds to aid Central Academy became public. As a result, the NAACP called for the resignation of all Noxubee county school board members who had knowledge of the board's aid to Central Academy, which at the time did not enroll any black students.[21]

United States v. Ike BrownEdit

In 2005, the U.S. Department of Justice began an investigation and the following year filed suit under the Voting Rights Act alleging that the chairman of the Noxubee County Democratic Party, Ike Brown, had conspired to orchestrate "relentless racial discrimination" against White voters.[22][23]

The court ruled that Brown, in conjunction with the Noxubee Democratic Executive Committee, had "manipulated the political process in ways specifically intended and designed to impair and impede participation of White voters and to dilute their votes".[22] This was the first time the Voting Rights Act of 1965 had been used to allege discrimination against Whites.[24]

CommunitiesEdit

CityEdit

TownsEdit

Unincorporated communitiesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved September 4, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Byington, Cyrus (1909). Choctaw Language Dictionary. Global Bible Society.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 28, 2013. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved November 9, 2019.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 27, 2010. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  10. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  12. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  13. ^ "Noxubee County, Miss". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved November 25, 2019.
  14. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Noxubee County, MS" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 25, 2022. Retrieved August 24, 2022. - Text list
  15. ^ "CATALOG 2007-09 Archived 2010-12-18 at the Wayback Machine, eastms.edu. 3 (3/147); retrieved March 1, 2011.
  16. ^ CATALOG 2007-09, eastms.edu, 10 (10/147) Archived 2010-12-18 at the Wayback Machine; retrieved on March 1, 2011.
  17. ^ "STORES OF THE SOUTH - OLD SALEM SCHOOL". Retrieved November 19, 2017.
  18. ^ "The Mashulaville School". Macon Beacon. August 11, 1911. Retrieved December 18, 2017.
  19. ^ "2006-07 State, District, and School Enrollment by Race/Gender with Poverty Data" (XLS). Mississippi Department of Education. January 16, 2008. Retrieved May 18, 2008.[dead link]
  20. ^ Bolton, Charles C. (2005). The Hardest Deal of All. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi. ISBN 9781578067176.
  21. ^ "Schools board member resigns before NAACP asks". Clarksdale Press-Register. May 19, 1982. p. 11.
  22. ^ a b Nossiter, Adam (October 11, 2006). "U.S. Says Blacks in Mississippi Suppress White Vote". The New York Times.
  23. ^ Shapiro, Ari (November 14, 2005). "White Voters in Mississippi Allege Voting Discrimination" (audio). National Public Radio.
  24. ^ "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA V. IKE BROWN NOXUBEE COUNTY DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE". Retrieved November 28, 2017.

Coordinates: 33°07′N 88°34′W / 33.11°N 88.57°W / 33.11; -88.57