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Leake County is a county located in the center of the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 23,805.[1] Its county seat is Carthage.[2] The county is named for Walter Leake, the Governor of Mississippi from 1822 to 1825.[3]

Leake County
Leake County Courthouse in Carthage
Leake County Courthouse in Carthage
Map of Mississippi highlighting Leake County
Location within the U.S. state of Mississippi
Map of the United States highlighting Mississippi
Mississippi's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 32°45′N 89°31′W / 32.75°N 89.52°W / 32.75; -89.52
Country United States
State Mississippi
Founded1833
Named forWalter Leake
SeatCarthage
Largest cityCarthage
Area
 • Total585 sq mi (1,520 km2)
 • Land583 sq mi (1,510 km2)
 • Water2.5 sq mi (6 km2)  0.4%%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total23,805
 • Density41/sq mi (16/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district2nd
Websitewww.leakecountyms.org

In 2010, the center of population of Mississippi was located in Leake County, near the town of Lena.[4]

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 585 square miles (1,520 km2), of which 583 square miles (1,510 km2) is land and 2.5 square miles (6.5 km2) (0.4%) is water.[5]

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

National protected areaEdit

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
18402,162
18505,533155.9%
18609,32468.5%
18708,496−8.9%
188013,14654.7%
189014,80312.6%
190017,36017.3%
191018,2985.4%
192016,973−7.2%
193021,80328.5%
194024,57012.7%
195021,610−12.0%
196018,660−13.7%
197017,085−8.4%
198018,79010.0%
199018,436−1.9%
200020,94013.6%
201023,80513.7%
Est. 201622,620[6]−5.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2013[1]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 23,805 people residing in the county. 49.5% were White, 40.6% Black or African American, 6.0% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 2.8% of some other race and 0.8% of two or more races. 4.3% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race).

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 20,940 people, 7,611 households, and 5,563 families residing in the county. The population density was 36 people per square mile (14/km²). There were 8,585 housing units at an average density of 15 per square mile (6/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 56.14% White, 37.42% Black or African American, 4.56% Native American, 0.15% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.14% from other races, and 0.57% from two or more races. 2.10% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 7,611 households out of which 34.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.20% were married couples living together, 16.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.90% were non-families. 24.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.13. In the county, the population was spread out with 26.90% under the age of 18, 10.10% from 18 to 24, 27.00% from 25 to 44, 21.70% from 45 to 64, and 14.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 98.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $27,055, and the median income for a family was $32,147. Males had a median income of $27,367 versus $18,307 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,365. About 18.10% of families and 23.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.90% of those under age 18 and 23.90% of those age 65 or over.

Government and infrastructureEdit

The county is quite rural, with Carthage the only city and three towns.

The Mississippi Department of Corrections contracted for development of the Walnut Grove Youth Correctional Facility, which opened in 2001 in the town of Walnut Grove.[12] The facility was operated by the private Management and Training Corporation (MTC).[13]

By 2006, the Town of Walnut Grove annexed the land of the prison, resulting in an apparent increase in population, which was chiefly associated with prisoners.[14] MTC was repeatedly cited for problems with poor treatment of prisoners, and abuses within the facility. The state closed it in 2016.[15]


EducationEdit

Racial segregationEdit

Schools in Leake County are effectively segregated by race. Most White students attend private schools while Black and Hispanic children attend the local public schools.

School Total Students White Students Black Students Hispanic Students Note
Leake County 24,000 56% 37% 2% 2010 Census
Leake Academy (Private) 578 571 (99%) 0 (0%) 3 (>1%) [16]
Leake Central High School(Public) 562 132 (20%) 373 (66%) 57 (10%) NOTE

PoliticsEdit

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[17]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 56.6% 4,782 42.4% 3,584 1.0% 83
2012 54.1% 4,863 45.4% 4,079 0.5% 41
2008 55.0% 5,148 44.4% 4,151 0.6% 60
2004 60.4% 4,962 39.1% 3,212 0.5% 40
2000 59.2% 4,114 40.2% 2,793 0.7% 45
1996 47.6% 3,017 45.8% 2,902 6.6% 419
1992 50.6% 3,943 42.8% 3,333 6.6% 510
1988 59.9% 4,168 40.0% 2,787 0.1% 8
1984 62.0% 4,663 37.9% 2,845 0.1% 8
1980 46.8% 3,624 52.1% 4,033 1.1% 81
1976 45.4% 2,952 52.5% 3,415 2.2% 141
1972 79.1% 4,217 19.8% 1,053 1.1% 59
1968 7.2% 453 20.5% 1,295 72.3% 4,568
1964 96.2% 4,343 3.8% 170
1960 8.8% 286 29.3% 953 61.9% 2,011
1956 7.3% 220 82.5% 2,475 10.1% 304
1952 18.4% 603 81.6% 2,667
1948 0.5% 12 7.0% 180 92.6% 2,392
1944 0.9% 24 99.2% 2,800
1940 0.6% 17 99.3% 2,802 0.1% 4
1936 0.3% 8 99.3% 2,566 0.4% 10
1932 0.7% 14 98.8% 1,903 0.5% 9
1928 11.1% 212 88.9% 1,695 0.0% 0
1924 3.7% 48 96.3% 1,255
1920 9.9% 121 88.1% 1,082 2.0% 25
1916 2.1% 31 96.1% 1,434 1.9% 28
1912 1.1% 11 86.9% 910 12.0% 126

CommunitiesEdit

CityEdit

TownsEdit

Census-designated placesEdit

Unincorporated communitiesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved September 4, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 183.
  4. ^ "Centers of Population by State: 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 3, 2014. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 28, 2013. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  12. ^ "Five Private Prisons Archived 2012-10-13 at the Wayback Machine." Mississippi Department of Corrections. Retrieved on November 21, 2010.
  13. ^ "Walnut Grove Correctional Facility" (PDF). Management and Training Corporation. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 December 2012. Retrieved 24 March 2013.
  14. ^ "Walnut Grove." First Impressions. Mississippi State University, February 2008. 0 (3/21). Retrieved on August 14, 2010. "Looking at the MDA profile, the population growth is impressive (year 2000 – 488, year 2006 – 1,424). However, we learned that most of this population growth has been due to the location and annexation of the Walnut Grove Youth Correctional Facility."
  15. ^ Wiliams, Timothy (16 September 2016). "Privately Run Mississippi Prison, Called a Scene of Horror, is Shut Down". New York Times. Retrieved 16 September 2016.
  16. ^ "Leake Academy". National Center for Educational Statistics. US Department of Education. Retrieved 15 June 2019.
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-04.

External linksEdit