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Examples: the animation of suface waves does not work: "forbidden"

Fixed. -- 140.109.176.119 07:50, 12 January 2006 (UTC)

Polarisation of a longitudinal waveEdit

How can a longitudinal wave be polarized? Polarisation is defined with transversal waves only. So, a longitudinal electrical wave in air is hypothetic. 84.73.189.253 13:23, 25 April 2006 (UTC)

A simple google search seem to show that mathematically, it's impossible (aka., the equations are not correctly formed to demonstrae this). I think that the equations are considering a homogenous medium and not a hetrogenous medium. This page could help you on longitudinal wave (aka, surface waves) polarized ... http://www.tpub.com/content/neets/14182/css/14182_76.htm (now cited in page) 204.56.7.1 17:32, 31 May 2006 (UTC)

Removed sentence that referred to a standing wave as exhibiting longitudinal propagation - while it may have a longitudinal mode, propagation is as a transverse EM wave. Bert 13:27, 3 June 2006 (UTC)

The Zenneck wave is not a transverse wave. Restoring sentence. 204.56.7.1 17:11, 5 June 2006 (UTC)

Surface Wave in Coax and E-LineEdit

Added TM mode in coax and unshielded conductor along with references. N6gn (talk) 06:14, 4 July 2009 (UTC)

Clarification please P- and S-wavesEdit

An editor recently added "Surface waves are combinations of P and S waves" yet S-waves states they are "A type of elastic wave...so named because they move through the body of an object, unlike surface waves". These seem contradictory. I am a biologist wishing to understand this physics in the area of animal communication. Could someone clarify this please.__DrChrissy (talk) 18:03, 17 May 2013 (UTC)

SplitEdit

this article is a wp:chimera. also, the see-also and external-material sections need cleanup, which will be facilitated by the split. intend do it in a couple of days. thanks. Fgnievinski (talk) 18:49, 23 November 2014 (UTC)

Wow, took you a long time between making that suggestion and putting the template on the article. I don't entirely agree that this is a chimera, surface waves of all types arise in a similar way. If it is split, the right title would be ground wave for longwave radio transmissions. That is the common name and it already redirects to this section. SpinningSpark 16:58, 11 August 2019 (UTC)
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