Talk:Mount Ibuki

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The claim of world record annual snowfall is dubious. Icy bay Alaska is much higher on an annual basis. Even Snoqualmie Pass frequently exceeds Mount Ibuki's record per Washington State Dept. of Transportation.

The claim in the Mount Ibuki article is " On February 14, 1927, the depth of snow at the top of the peak was 11.82 m (38.8 ft)", not "annual snowfall". It is the depth of the accumulated snow on a single day, not the annual total. Wikipedia at [1] shows The world record for snow depth is 1,182 cm (38.78 ft). It was measured on the slope of Mt. Ibuki in Shiga Prefecture, Japan at altitude of 1,200 m (3,900 ft) on February 14, 1927 (and they cite [2] The North American record for snow depth is 1,150 cm (37.7 ft). It was measured at Tamarack, California at altitude of 2,100 m (7,000 ft) in March 1911. HarryWhoElse (talk) 08:32, 26 February 2015 (UTC)