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TitleEdit

This page incorrectly redirects to "Computer Literacy." Digital Literacy and Computer Literacy are not identical terms. They are used in different contexts, represent separate industries, and are defined by different interests. Therefore, their literacy (measurements of and disciplines for acquiring competency and comprehension) each have different parameters. The faculties of Universities expanding their Library Sciences programs are concerned with Digital Archiving and Digital Literacy, not Computer Archiving (if there even is such a thing) and Computer Literacy. The usage of these terms is quite distinct, and it is incorrect to colonize the term Digital Literacy under the rubric of Computer Literacy, as has been done here. Computer literacy refers to a competency with respect to a tool. Digital literacy refers to a competency with respect to the production and organization of data and knowledge (i.e., learning) systems, which may include an examination of computers and other tools used in that enterprise. drmjb (talk) 23:26, 25 August 2008 (UTC)

I added some wording edits to better state what digitial literacy is clearer. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Mallorypappas (talkcontribs) 22:52, 10 March 2018 (UTC)

DefinitionEdit

I don't like the opening paragraph of this page. There is no accepted definition of digital literacy and the one provided is a lot closer to a definition of information literacy than digital literacy. I plan to revise the first paragraph and make some changes to make it much more nuanced that it is at present. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Bobbyelliott (talkcontribs) 14:03, 7 July 2014 (UTC)

The introduction to digital literacy comes off as too redundant. There are too many unnecessary links that lead to other pages. Why does there need to be a link for "digital" or "smartphones"? For this topic, so many links may stray off topic and take the focus off the actual article and lead one to believe it is a page for different kinds of technology. Keykeen (talk) 18:16, 16 November 2016 (UTC)

With the help of Melissaborrego, I was able to edit some of the introduction paragraph.

"Digital literacy is the knowledge, skills, and behaviors used in a broad range of digital devices such as smartphones, tablets, and desktops all of which are seen as network rather than computing devices. Digital literacy initially focused on digital skills and stand-alone computers, but the focus has moved from stand-alone to network devices. Digital literacy is distinct from computer literacy and is considered one of the nine components of digital citizenship.

The last two sentences of this paragraph needed some edits. I made a few, but please continue to improve them. I condensed two sentences and deleted the last one altogether. I think the idea it conveyed about critical and ethical thinking are explained more clearly in the paragraph below. However, the one element from the deleted sentence that is not represented in the paragraph below is the ethical element. If you want to insert that idea here or in the next paragraph, I think your best course is to find a source to summarizeCathygaborusf (talk) 00:10, 28 November 2016 (UTC)Cathygaborusf

A digitally literate individual will possess a range of digital skills, knowledge of the basic principles of computing devices, and skills in using computer networks. The individual has the ability to engage in online communities and social networks while adhering to behavioral protocols. The individual is able to find, capture, and evaluate information. Digital literacy requires the individual to understand the societal issues raised by digital technologies and possess critical thinking skills. These skills can be possessed through digital experiences that pushes individuals to think in a variety of ways through a multitude of media platforms. The evolution of digital media has quickly integrated into literacy. Digital literacy does not replace traditional forms of literacy. It builds upon the foundation of traditional forms of literacy. It allows individuals to communicate and learn in through a plethora of ways. Different kinds of skills ranging from social to critical thinking enable individuals to interpret the meanings of digital devices."

The introduction has been condensed and many links have been removed to keep the focus on the main topic. However, there should be another paragraph or a few more sentences discussing the importance of digital literacy. I am having some trouble on putting this together since there are too many ideas that can be written into this paragraph. Any suggestions on what should be written for the concluding paragraph to make the introduction stronger? Keykeen (talk) 09:41, 22 November 2016 (UTC)

I think the wikilinks can be kept, but maybe having only one of each existing link would be best. There are a couple of links that appear more than once or twice, so I can go ahead and have only one for each. The phrase "learn to use computers" links to the computer literacy page, and while it does make sense, I think it should be un-linked, as the computer literacy page is already linked within the introduction. Any thoughts? Sarahibrahim (talk) 18:07, 28 November 2016 (UTC)
Hi Sarah. I agree! Please move forward with your suggestions. Melissaborrego (talk) 18:17, 28 November 2016 (UTC)

Some really good editing here, but, as you note, there is room for improvement.

First, you deleted the best passage from the original intro (in my opinion): Digital literacy is the marrying of the two terms digital and literacy; however, it is much more than a combination of the two terms. Digital information is a symbolic representation of data, and literacy refers to the ability to read for knowledge, write coherently, and think critically about the written word.

Then, you keep in the idea that digital literacy builds on traditional literacy, but you seem to have cut out the Henry Jenkins citation. You need to leave that in.

I agree that the intro seems redundant and that you can slim it down. However, I disagree that the links harm the flow of the intro. One principle of Wikipedia is providing links to readers so that they can go check out related terms that they may not know. Using links lets the reader decide if s/he wants to click away and get info needed to understand the “Digital literacy” entry or if s/he wants to ignore the links and just keep reading. So, cut out the redundancy but do not eliminate the links.Cathygaborusf (talk) 23:43, 27 November 2016 (UTC)Cathygaborusf

I made changes to the intro based on feedback, please let me know what you all think:

Digital literacy is the marrying of the two terms digital and literacy; however, it is much more than a combination of the two terms. Digital information is a symbolic representation of data, and literacy refers to the ability to read for knowledge, write coherently, and think critically about the written word.

A digitally literate individual will possess a range of digital skills, knowledge of the basic principles of computing devices, and skills in using computer networks. The individual has the ability to engage in online communities and social networks while adhering to behavioral protocols. The individual is able to find, capture, and evaluate information. Digital literacy requires the individual to understand the societal issues raised by digital technologies and possess critical thinking skills. These skills can be possessed through digital experiences that pushes individuals to think in a variety of ways through a multitude of media platforms. The evolution of digital media has quickly integrated into literacy.

However, digital literacy does not replace traditional forms of literacy. Digital literacy builds upon the foundation of traditional forms of literacy. [2] Digital literacy allows individuals to communicate and learn in through a plethora of ways. Different kinds of skills ranging from social to critical thinking enable individuals to interpret the meanings of digital devices.

In addition to critical thinking skills, digital literacy involves ethical norms and standards of behavior in online environments. Every online community has its individual sets of norms and rules in regard to creating and circulating information. [2] Behavioral protocols are required in the digital age where there is no longer a clear distinction between online consumers and producers. [2]

Digital literacy is one of the nine core elements of digital citizenship. A digital citizen has the ability to be active citizens in online environments and possesses the technical literacy skills necessary to effectively engage with the web. [3] The internet is accessible in their homes and individuals use the internet daily.[3]Melissaborrego (talk) 04:29, 28 November 2016 (UTC)

Hello Melissa and Cathy, thank you both for your feedback. Melissa, your revisions fit Wikipedia's criteria and sets an unbiased tone that will be easy to read. Great job!Keykeen (talk) 17:27, 28 November 2016 (UTC)

Hello, Im new to this, but shouldn't the end of the first paragraph where the artical describes where "digital literacy" came from should be near or part of the third paragraph because the name and what the name is comprised of fit together more. Then the order would go from the end of the first paragraph bing about the internet, then into why its not computer literacy, then into what digital literacy is and why it is called that. Foxx Molinari (talk) 07:07, 25 May 2017 (UTC)

I would agree with others that said that the lead section seems too long. Often times, there are points where the article tries to differentiate "digital literacy" with other terms, but instead, comprises the clarity of its meaning. Similarly, I believe that there were too many points mentioned in the beginning which can attribute to its length as well. I believe that if it can have more concise language, it can help foreshadow the rest of the article and have less repetition. Perhaps there can be a separate section detailing the differences mentioned in the lead as well. --Mary Mijares (talk) 05:51, 14 February 2018 (UTC)

The Academic and Pedagogcial section I think is not only unecessary, but it doesn't make much sense. But, I do not want to cut our someone else's work if there is a valid point behind it. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Mallorypappas (talkcontribs) 23:25, 10 March 2018 (UTC)

Digital Literacy vs Information LiteracyEdit

The subject of this article is "Information Literacy" not "Digital Literacy". Being digitally literate is not just about being able to use Information Technology (IT) or a particular programme really well. It is about feeling comfortable communicating in many different ways using digital technologies, i.e. it is more about communication than out finding information.

Being digitally literate is not just about being able to use Information Technology (IT) or a particular programme really well. It is about feeling comfortable communicating in many different ways using digital technologies.

Digital Literacy definitions:

Davies and Merchant (2009), “see digital literacy as a set of social practices that are interwoven with contemporary “ways of being” (p83).


In research reports and other publications it is obvious there is a general acceptance of what Digital Literacy is, however, few actually state the definition they use. The term as it is currently used was first coined by Paul Gilster (1997) but thirteen years is a long time in modern technology. There is also still some debate about the term Digital Literacy but most have come to accept the use as explained by Hague and Williamson (2009). Definitions are troublesome things; they can be confusing in their brevity or in their loquacity. Definitions help people feel they have a grasp of the subject but it is easy to misdirect people with them. It would indeed be wrong not to try to offer some sort of definition for Digital Literacy, luckily there are a number of definitions from research and organisations such as the European Union. For example the following definition from the Digital Literacies Research Briefing by the Technology Enhanced Learning phase of the Teaching and Learning Research Programme states that Digital Literacy is:

“... the constantly changing practices through which people make traceable meanings using digital technologies.”

Gillen and Barton (2010 p9)

the E-Inclusion Initiative definition is;

“Digital literacy involves the confident and critical use of Information Society Technology (IST) for work, leisure and communication. It is underpinned by basic skills in ICT: the use of computers to retrieve, assess, store, produce, present and exchange information, and to communicate and participate in collaborative networks via the Internet.”

Danish Technology Institute, European Commission E-Inclusion Initiatives 2008

and this definition is from The eLearning Programme of the European Commission.

Digital Literacy is the awareness, attitude and ability of individuals to appropriately use digital tools and facilities to identify, access, manage, integrate, evaluate, analyse and synthesize digital resources, construct new knowledge, create media expressions, and communicate with others, in the context of specific life situations, in order to enable constructive social action; and to reflect upon this process.

DigEuLit Project 2006

Different definitions tend to address different populations with different understandings of the issues and terms involved. However, wising a combination of current understandings of Digital Literacy it could be considered as: the confident and comfortable use of technology whether for work, leisure or communication for the usual daily activities of living. It is using technology to solve problems to improve our own and other people’s lives and goes beyond the acquisition of operational skills to the critical and discriminating use of technology.

TNTEdit

This article has many, many issues. It appears to have been primarily written by people who neither understand technology nor education (mostly people who failed to upgrade their skills past the "digital divide", and are trying to document what few technologies they actually understand), it really needs the attention of some people in the IT sector.

More than half of this article documents the digital divide, which is a separate topic onto itself, and should not have its body, except for a short synopsis documented herein. The remainder seems to primarily document failed educational technologies, which were implemented because they were novel, and topics which are out of scope but do little to establish notability. Quite a few of the citations are comments made by people in the 70s, which to be frank is an unfathomably long time ago, based on the speed at which technology advances (see Moore's Law), and if anything belongs in a "History" section. As a computer scientist and future STEM educator I believe it should be entirely rewritten. If there are no objections, I will start a major rework soon. Ethanpet113 (talk) 00:18, 9 December 2018 (UTC)

Lifting TNT, completed overhaul.Ethanpet113 (talk) 21:23, 9 December 2018 (UTC)

DubiousEdit

A statement in the article claims that hose with the most digital literacy have the biggest voice online. I find this to be dubious due to the sheer volume of available information. The consensus in SEO is that it's more a matter of driving traffic for bots, than actually making your information pretty, though of course if the information is incomprehensible that's a different story. Additionally most information posted online is from users screaming into the ether and will not get any engagement, not matter how pretty its presentation. Anyway, it seems suspect, but a (dubious) citation is provided so I've left it in.Ethanpet113 (talk) 22:33, 9 December 2018 (UTC)

Proposed merge with Web literacyEdit

Web literacy is distinct from digital literacy in name only. It happens to have some works which treat it as a special topic, but those are primarily bodies with a WP:COI with the subject matter. It should be merged as a subtopic of digital literacy. Ethanpet113 (talk) 02:37, 10 December 2018 (UTC)

I vote yes - Web literacy is a subset of Digital literacy Mapmaker345 (talk) 19:15, 25 January 2019 (UTC)
Merge - Web literacy seems to be a concept mainly pushed by Mozilla. The parts of that article that don't reference Mozilla are basically covered by [Digital_literacy#Academic_and_pedagogical_concepts|this] part of the Digital literacy article. I'm not sure Web literacy even meets WP:N, for that matter. klɛz (talk) 20:17, 20 March 2019 (UTC)
I vote no and the reason that web literacy was pushed by Mozilla and is still a major initiative of Internet health warrants a separate page. As someone who has developed taxonomies of online reading comprehension, digital literacies, and web literacy they are also ontologically different.

Why not just collapse them all under literacy?Jgmac1106 (talk) 15:13, 3 July 2019 (UTC)

I vote NO. Merging into Literacy would create a huge article. Better to keep it separate as is, with a cross-link to Literacy. Bellagio99 (talk) 15:44, 3 July 2019 (UTC)
Return to "Digital literacy" page.