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Tabuk, (Ilocano: Siudad ti Tabuk), officially the City of Tabuk, or simply referred to as Tabuk City, is a 5th class city and capital of the province of Kalinga, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 110,642 people.[3]

Tabuk
City of Tabuk
Cathedral of the Episcopal Church in the Philippines, Tabuk City
Cathedral of the Episcopal Church in the Philippines, Tabuk City
Official seal of Tabuk
Seal
Map of Kalinga with Tabuk highlighted
Map of Kalinga with Tabuk highlighted
Tabuk is located in Philippines
Tabuk
Tabuk
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 17°27′00″N 121°27′30″E / 17.45°N 121.4583°E / 17.45; 121.4583Coordinates: 17°27′00″N 121°27′30″E / 17.45°N 121.4583°E / 17.45; 121.4583
Country Philippines
RegionCordillera Administrative Region (CAR)
ProvinceKalinga
DistrictLone District
FoundedJune 16, 1950
CityhoodJune 23, 2007 (Lost cityhood in 2008 and 2010)
Affirmed CityhoodFebruary 15, 2011
Barangays42 (see Barangays)
Government
[1]
 • TypeSangguniang Panlungsod
 • MayorDarwin C. Estrañero
 • Vice MayorBernard Glenn M. Dao-as
 • CongressmanAllen Jesse C. Mangaoang
 • Electorate62,691 voters (2019)
Area
[2]
 • Total700.25 km2 (270.37 sq mi)
Population
 (2015 census)[3]
 • Total110,642
 • Density160/km2 (410/sq mi)
Economy
 • Income class5th city income class
 • Poverty incidence17.7% (2015)[4]
 • Revenue (₱)778,971,527.59 (2016)
Time zoneUTC+8 (PST)
ZIP code
3800
PSGC
IDD:area code+63 (0)74
Climate typetropical rainforest climate
Native languagesKalinga language
Ga'dang
Ilocano
Tagalog
Websitewww.tabuk.gov.ph

Tabuk City is 461 kilometres (286 mi) from Manila via Cauayan/Roxas and 443 kilometres (275 mi) via San Mateo/Roxas.

HistoryEdit

The former municipal district of Tabuk was transformed into a regular municipality by Republic Act No. 533, approved June 16, 1950.[5]

CityhoodEdit

Tabuk became the Cordillera's second city after Baguio on June 23, 2007, when 17,060 voters ratified Republic Act No. 9404. On November 18, 2008, the SC voted 6-5 to revert Tabuk City, among other 15 cities', status back to municipalities. However, on December 21, 2009, the Supreme Court reversed its first decision, returning the 16 back to cities. It contended that these cities were not covered by Republic Act 9009 – the law enacted in June 2001 that increased the income requirement for cities from P20 million to P100 million – as proven by transcripts of Senate debates while crafting RA 9009.

But on August 24, 2010, the SC made a reversal again, reinstating its November 2008 decision. It concluded that the Local Government Code as amended by RA 9009 should be followed, without exception.

Finally, on February 15, 2011, the 16 became cities again after the SC made a third reversal. This time, the High Court acknowledged, among others, that the 16 cityhood laws amended RA 9009, effectively amending the Local Government Code itself.

BarangaysEdit

Tabuk is politically subdivided into 42 barangays.[2]

  • Agbannawag
  • Amlao
  • Appas
  • Bagumbayan
  • Balawag
  • Balong
  • Bantay
  • Bulanao
  • Bulanao Norte
  • Cabaritan
  • Cabaruan
  • Calaccad
  • Calanan
  • Dilag
  • Dupag
  • Gobgob
  • Guilayon
  • Ipil
  • Lanna
  • Laya East
  • Laya West
  • Lucog
  • Magnao
  • Magsaysay
  • Malalao
  • Masablang
  • Nambaran
  • Nambucayan
  • Naneng
  • Dagupan Centro (Poblacion)
  • San Juan
  • Suyang
  • Tuga
  • Bado Dangwa
  • Bulo
  • Casigayan
  • Cudal
  • Dagupan West
  • Lacnog
  • Malin-awa
  • New Tanglag
  • San Julian

DemographicsEdit

YearPop.±% p.a.
1918 4,079—    
1939 3,343−0.94%
1948 7,376+9.19%
1960 21,261+9.22%
1970 28,016+2.79%
1975 33,918+3.91%
1980 42,768+4.74%
1990 57,200+2.95%
1995 63,507+1.98%
2000 78,633+4.69%
2007 87,912+1.55%
2010 103,912+6.27%
2015 110,642+1.20%
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[3][6][7][8]

In the 2015 census, the population of Tabuk was 110,642 people,[3] with a density of 160 inhabitants per square kilometre or 410 inhabitants per square mile.

LanguagesEdit

Tabuk is home to two indigenous languages, the Kina-linga language which is used throughout the Kalinga province a town in Mountain Province, and the Malaweg language which is used in Tabuk and southwest Cagayan province. In the 1970s, Ilokano and Kankanaey migrants came to the province and imported the Ilokano and Kankanaey languages during the martial law era.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "City". Quezon City, Philippines: Department of the Interior and Local Government. Retrieved 30 May 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Province: Kalinga". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 12 November 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d Census of Population (2015). "Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. PSA. Retrieved 20 June 2016.
  4. ^ "PSA releases the 2015 Municipal and City Level Poverty Estimates". Quezon City, Philippines. Retrieved 12 October 2019.
  5. ^ "R.A. No. 533: An Act to Convert the Municipal District of Tabuk, Sub-province of Kalinga, Mountain Province, into a Regular Municipality to be Known as the Municipality of Tabuk". PhilippineLaw.info. Archived from the original on 4 January 2015. Retrieved 4 January 2015.
  6. ^ Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. NSO. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  7. ^ Censuses of Population (1903–2007). "Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR)". Table 1. Population Enumerated in Various Censuses by Province/Highly Urbanized City: 1903 to 2007. NSO.
  8. ^ "Province of Kalinga". Municipality Population Data. Local Water Utilities Administration Research Division. Retrieved 17 December 2016.

External linksEdit