Swedish Centre for Architecture and Design

The Swedish Centre for Architecture and Design (Swedish: Svenskt arkitektur- och designcentrum) or ArkDes, previously known as the Museum of Architecture (Arkitekturmuseet), is a Swedish national museum dedicated to architecture and design. It is located on the island of Skeppsholmen in Stockholm, Sweden, in the same complex as Moderna Museet. The museum exhibits architecture, urban planning and design under its current director Kieran Long. It is an administrative authority under the Ministry of Culture.

Swedish Centre for Architecture and Design
Statens centrum för arkitektur och design
Arkdes Logo.svg
ArkDes, the Swedish Centre for Architecture and Design, in Stockholm, Sweden.jpg
ArkDes (Arkitektur- och designcentrum)
Swedish Centre for Architecture and Design is located in Stockholm Municipality
Swedish Centre for Architecture and Design
Location of ArkDes in Stockholm
Former name
Museum of Architecture (Arkitekturmuseet)
Established1962 (1962)
LocationStockholm Sweden
Coordinates59°19′33″N 18°05′06″E / 59.32583°N 18.08500°E / 59.32583; 18.08500Coordinates: 59°19′33″N 18°05′06″E / 59.32583°N 18.08500°E / 59.32583; 18.08500
TypeArchitectural museum
Collection size
  • c. 3,000,000 drawings and documents
  • 600,000 photos
  • 2,000 models
[1]
FounderSveriges Arkitekter, SA (Architects of Sweden)
DirectorKieran Long
OwnerGovernment of Sweden
Public transit accessBus to Arkitektur-/Moderna museet
Websitewww.arkdes.se

HistoryEdit

The Museum of Architecture was founded in 1962 at the initiative of the National Association of Swedish Architects (Sveriges Arkitekters Riksförbund) as a private foundation. It was nationalized in 1978, at which point it was housed in buildings previously occupied by the Nautical Chart Department on Skeppsholmen. The new premises, designed by the Pritzker Prize laureate Rafael Moneo following an international competition, were inaugurated in February 1998.[1]

On 28 February 2013, the government issued new instructions for the museum and, on 1 May, changed its name to the Statens centrum för arkitektur och design (The Swedish Centre for Architecture and Design). Since the mid-1990s, the museum has been administered by the Ministry of Culture.[1]

BuildingsEdit

ArkDes is housed in two buildings, the Navy's old drill hall, Exercishuset,[2] and a more recently constructed building designed by the Spanish architect Rafael Moneo constructed between 1994 and 1997.[3] The permanent and temporary exhibition halls stand in historic buildings designed by Fredrik Blom and the new building, designed in a functionalistic style,[3] contains offices, a library, research rooms, workshops, and archives holding the State Architecture Collection. The Moneo building was awarded the Kasper Salin Prize in 1998.[4] In June 2018, a new temporary exhibition space, Boxen,[5] was opened to designs by Dehlin Brattgård Architects.[6]

FunctionEdit

 
ArkDes is located on Skeppsholmen in central Stockholm partially in buildings designed by Rafael Moneo.

ArkDes has a permanent exhibition and several temporary thematic exhibitions.[7] The permanent exhibition presents Swedish architecture through the ages in drawings, models, photographs, and historical objects.[8]

Other spaces are dedicated to thematic exhibitions which explore contemporary architecture and design, alongside historical shows.[9] In ArkDes' archival collections are drawings, models and photographs of the works of around 500 architects. The museum's library contains journals from the 1930s onwards, as well as over 24,000 books.[10]

ArkDes manages the Einar Mattsson's Foundation for Building and Property Research.[11]

The Centre has cooperated with the Wikimedia Foundation on a number of occasions. In 2013 and 2014, Wikimedia Sweden held its annual meeting there, and in 2014, the ArkDes hosted the "Meet Wikipedia" event.[12]

Notable ExhibitionsEdit

ArkDes has hosted a number of notable temporary exhibitions and collaborations. In 2010, ArkDes hosted the exhibition "Greta Magnusson Grossman: From Stockholm to Beverly Hills", an exhibition of pre-war furniture design and experimental architecture of the 1940s, 50s and 60s.[13] In 2013, the museum presented "The Fashion World of Jean-Paul Gaultier: From the sidewalk to the catwalk".[14] In 2014 ArkDes hosted "Blockholm", an exhibition based on a transfer of Stockholm’s land data into Minecraft to create an exact, full-scale representation of the Swedish capital.[15]

In 2015 a collaboration between ArkDes and Moderna Museet presented the work of Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson[16] and in 2016 a similar collaboration resulted in a major exhibition of the work of the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama.[17] In 2017, ArkDes exhibited a major monographic exhibition on the Austrian-Swedish architect Josef Frank in a collaboration with the MAK in Vienna[18] alongside an exhibition on the HI-group design collective.[19]

Since 2017, under the directorship of Kieran Long, the museum has presented a number of temporary exhibitions in its main hall and in Boxen, a "machine for fast-changing, experimental exhibitions".[20] These have included: "Public Luxury", an exhibition "about architecture, design and the struggle for public life";[21] "The Future Starts Here", an exhibition made in collaboration with the Victoria and Albert Museum exploring the relationships between design and technology;[22] "Space Popular: Value in the Virtual", a project exploring Virtual Reality, architecture and urbanism;[23] the culminating edition of the Cruising Pavilion; and an exhibition exploring the prefabricated concrete panel curated by Pedro Ignacio Alonso and Hugo Palmarola.[24] In 2020, Boxen hosted the world’s first museum exhibition exploring the creative field of ASMR.[25][26] As a result of COVID-19 it had a virtual opening.[27]

ArkDes hosts the annual "Gingerbread House" competition every December.[28]

DirectorsEdit

 
Kieran Long, director of ArkDes since 2017
  • Kieran Long, 2017–[29]
  • Kerstin Brunnberg, Interim Director, July 2014–July 2015[1]
  • Lena Rahoult, 2009–July 2014[30]
  • Bitte Nygren, 1999–2008[31]
  • Jöran Lindvall, 1985–99
  • Bengt O.H. Johansson, 1966–77

GalleryEdit

BuildingsEdit

ExhibitionsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Statens centrum för arkitektur och design". www.regeringen.se (in Swedish). Government of Sweden. pp. 6–17. Retrieved 3 June 2015.
  2. ^ "MODERNA MUSEET, ARKITEKTURMUSEET (EXERCISHUSET) (akt.)". www.bebyggelseregistret.raa.se. Swedish National Heritage Board. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  3. ^ a b Moneo, Rafael; Mårtelius, Johan; Jewson, William; Lidman, Åke E:son (1998). Modern Museum and Swedish Museum of Architecture in Stockholm (in Swedish). Stockholm: Arkitektur. ISBN 91-87214-76-8.
  4. ^ Schiratzki, Malin. "Kasper Salinpriset till Arkitekturmuseum" (PDF). www.sfv.se. National Property Board of Sweden. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  5. ^ "Boxen – ArkDes utställningsrum med samtida design och arkitektur". ArkDes – Sveriges nationella centrum för arkitektur och design (in Swedish). Retrieved 2019-07-09.
  6. ^ "Boxen at ArkDes / Dehlin Brattgård Arkitekter". ArchDaily. 2019-02-18. Retrieved 2019-07-09.
  7. ^ "Utställningar". www.arkdes.se. ArkDes. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  8. ^ Rörby, Martin (2004). Arkitektur i Sverige: funktion, konstruktion och estetik genom tiderna. Stockholm: Arkitekturmuseet. ISBN 9185460702.
  9. ^ "Utställningar". ArkDes – Sveriges nationella centrum för arkitektur och design (in Swedish). Retrieved 2019-07-09.
  10. ^ "Arkitekturmuseets bibliotek". www.archive-se.com. HISS. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  11. ^ Fröjd, Mattias (20 November 2012). "Einar Mattsson-stipendiater är utsedda". www.fastighetsnytt.se (in Swedish). Fastighetsnytt. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  12. ^ "Träffa Wikipedia". www.arkdes.se. ArkDes. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  13. ^ "Greta Magnusson Grossman: From Stockholm to Beverly Hills". ArkDes - Sweden's National Centre for Architecture and Design. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  14. ^ Stockholm TT Spektra (2 November 2011). "Arkitekturmuseum visar Gaultier". www.svd.se. Svenska Dagbladet. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  15. ^ "Blockholm: The Amazing City". ArkDes - Sweden's National Centre for Architecture and Design. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  16. ^ "Olafur Eliasson: Reality machines". ArkDes - Sweden's National Centre for Architecture and Design. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  17. ^ "Yayoi Kusama: In Infinity". ArkDes - Sweden's National Centre for Architecture and Design. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  18. ^ "Josef Frank: Against Design (MAK)". www.mak.at. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  19. ^ "The HI-group: Craftsmanship in the Plastic Age". ArkDes - Sweden's National Centre for Architecture and Design. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  20. ^ "Dehlin Brattgård Arkitekter creates "robust machine for experimental exhibitions" at ArkDes museum". Dezeen. 2019-02-27. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  21. ^ "Public Luxury". ArkDes - Sweden's National Centre for Architecture and Design. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  22. ^ "The Future Starts Here – from V&A in London". ArkDes - Sweden's National Centre for Architecture and Design. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  23. ^ "Space Popular: Value in the Virtual – ArkDes". ArkDes - Sweden's National Centre for Architecture and Design. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  24. ^ "Flying Panels: How Concrete Panels Changed the World". ArkDes - Sweden's National Centre for Architecture and Design. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  25. ^ "This way for brain tingles: ASMR gets a shiver-inducing exhibition". The Guardian. Retrieved 2020-04-21.
  26. ^ "WEIRD SENSATION FEELS GOOD: An Exhibition About ASMR – ArkDes". ArkDes. Retrieved 2020-06-17.
  27. ^ "ArkDes presents a virtual vernissage of WEIRD SENSATION FEELS GOOD: An exhibition about ASMR". e-flux Architecture. Retrieved 2020-06-17.
  28. ^ "Gingerbread House 2019". ArkDes - Sweden's National Centre for Architecture and Design. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  29. ^ "Press release från the Ministry of Culture in Sweden". Government of Sweden. 10 September 2018.
  30. ^ Fristorp, Mimmi (19 December 2008). "Lena Rahoult ny chef för Arkitekturmuseet". www.dn.se. Dagens Nyheter. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  31. ^ Andersson, Patrik (25 April 2012). "Bitte Nygren". www.gp.se. Göteborgs-Posten. Retrieved 4 June 2015.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit