Second government of Adolfo Suárez

The second government of Adolfo Suárez was formed on 5 July 1977, following the latter's confirmation as Prime Minister of Spain by King Juan Carlos I on 17 June, as a result of the Union of the Democratic Centre (UCD) emerging as the largest parliamentary force at the 1977 general election.[1] It succeeded the first Suárez government and was the Government of Spain from 5 July 1977 to 6 April 1979, a total of 640 days, or 1 year, 9 months and 1 day.[2][3]

2nd government of Adolfo Suárez
Flag of Spain (1977–1981).svg
Government of Spain
1977–1979
Adolfo Suárez recibe al secretario general de Convergencia Democrática de Cataluña. Pool Moncloa. 16 de marzo de 1978 (cropped).jpeg
Adolfo Suárez in March 1978.
Date formed5 July 1977
Date dissolved6 April 1979
People and organisations
MonarchJuan Carlos I
Prime MinisterAdolfo Suárez
Deputy Prime MinistersManuel Gutiérrez Mellado1st, Enrique Fuentes Quintana2nd, Fernando Abril Martorell3rd (1977–1978)
Manuel Gutiérrez Mellado1st, Fernando Abril Martorell2nd (1978–1979)
No. of ministers19[a] (1977; 1978)
18[a] (1977–1978; 1978–1979)
Total no. of members24[a]
Member party  UCD
Status in legislatureMinority government
Opposition party  PSOE
Opposition leaderFelipe González
History
Election(s)1977 general election
Outgoing election1979 general election
Legislature term(s)Constituent Cortes
Budget(s)1978
PredecessorSuárez I
SuccessorSuárez III

Suárez's second cabinet was initially made up by independents and members from the political parties that had run within the UCD alliance, most of whom would end up joining it upon its transformation into a full-fledged political party.[4][5][6] It was automatically dismissed on 2 March 1979 as a consequence of the 1979 general election, but remained in acting capacity until the next government was sworn in.[7]

Cabinet changesEdit

Suárez's second government saw a number of cabinet changes during its tenure:

Council of MinistersEdit

The Council of Ministers was structured into the offices for the prime minister, the three deputy prime ministers and 18 ministries, including a number of deputy ministers without portfolio.[18][19] From February 1978, the council would only include two deputy prime ministers.[16]

Suárez II Government
(5 July 1977 – 6 April 1979)
Portfolio Name Party Took office Left office Ref.
Prime Minister Adolfo Suárez Indep./UCD[b] 17 June 1977 2 April 1979 [1]
First Deputy Prime Minister
Minister of Defence
Manuel Gutiérrez Mellado Military 5 July 1977 6 April 1979 [19]
[20]
Second Deputy Prime Minister
Minister of Economy
Enrique Fuentes Quintana Independent 5 July 1977 25 February 1978 [20]
[21]
Third Deputy Prime Minister Fernando Abril Martorell Independent 5 July 1977 25 February 1978 [21]
Minister of Foreign Affairs Marcelino Oreja Indep./UCD[b] 5 July 1977 6 April 1979 [19]
Minister of Justice Landelino Lavilla Indep./UCD[b] 5 July 1977 22 March 1979 [19]
Minister of Finance Francisco Fernández Ordóñez PSD/UCD[b] 5 July 1977 6 April 1979 [20]
Minister of the Interior Rodolfo Martín Villa Independent 5 July 1977 6 April 1979 [20]
Minister of Public Works and Urbanism Joaquín Garrigues Walker FPDL/UCD[b] 5 July 1977 6 April 1979 [20]
Minister of Education and Science Íñigo Cavero PDC/UCD[b] 5 July 1977 6 April 1979 [20]
Minister of Labour Manuel Jiménez de Parga Indep./UCD[b] 5 July 1977 25 February 1978 [20]
Minister of Industry and Energy Alberto Oliart Independent 5 July 1977 25 February 1978 [20]
Minister of Agriculture José Enrique Martínez Genique Independent 5 July 1977 25 February 1978 [20]
Minister of Trade and Tourism Juan Antonio García Díez PSD/UCD[b] 5 July 1977 6 April 1979 [20]
Minister of the Presidency José Manuel Otero Independent 5 July 1977 6 April 1979 [20]
Minister of Transport and Communications José Lladó Independent 5 July 1977 25 February 1978 [20]
Minister of Health and Social Security Enrique Sánchez de León AREX/UCD[b] 5 July 1977 6 April 1979 [20]
Minister of Culture and Welfare Pío Cabanillas Gallas PP/UCD[b] 5 July 1977 1 September 1977 [20]
Deputy Minister of the Regions, without portfolio Manuel Clavero PSLA/UCD[b] 5 July 1977 6 April 1979 [20]
Deputy Minister of Relations with the Cortes, without portfolio Ignacio Camuñas PDP/UCD[b] 5 July 1977 27 September 1977 [20]

Changes September 1977Edit

Portfolio Name Party Took office Left office Ref.
Minister of Culture[c] Pío Cabanillas Gallas PP/UCD[b] 1 September 1977 6 April 1979 [9]
Deputy Minister of Relations with the Cortes, without portfolio Discontinued on 30 September 1977 upon the officeholder's dismissal.[22]

Changes February 1978Edit

Portfolio Name Party Took office Left office Ref.
Second Deputy Prime Minister[d]
Minister of Economy
Fernando Abril Martorell UCD 25 February 1978 6 April 1979 [24]
[25]
Minister of Labour Rafael Calvo Ortega UCD 25 February 1978 6 April 1979 [25]
Minister of Industry and Energy Agustín Rodríguez Sahagún UCD 25 February 1978 6 April 1979 [25]
Minister of Agriculture Jaime Lamo de Espinosa UCD 25 February 1978 6 April 1979 [25]
Minister of Transport and Communications Salvador Sánchez-Terán UCD 25 February 1978 6 April 1979 [25]
Minister of Relations with the European Communities, without portfolio Leopoldo Calvo-Sotelo UCD 11 February 1978 6 April 1979 [26]

Changes 1979Edit

Portfolio Name Party Took office Left office Ref.
Minister of Justice Rodolfo Martín Villa took on the ordinary discharge of duties from 22 March 1979.[27]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Does not include the Prime Minister.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Joined the UCD in December 1977.
  3. ^ On 1 September 1977, the Ministry of Culture and Welfare was reorganized as the Ministry of Culture.[9]
  4. ^ Following Enrique Fuentes Quintana's stepping down as Second Deputy Prime Minister on 25 February 1978, the Third Deputy Prime Minister was promoted to second deputy status.[23]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Suárez, confirmado por el Rey, formará nuevo Gobierno". El País (in Spanish). 18 June 1977. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  2. ^ "Segundo Gobierno Suárez". El País (in Spanish). 5 July 1977. Retrieved 5 January 2020.
  3. ^ "Los Gobiernos de Suárez". El País (in Spanish). 30 January 1981. Retrieved 5 January 2020.
  4. ^ "Diez ministros pertenecen a la "Unión del Centro Democrático"". La Vanguardia (in Spanish). 5 July 1977. Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  5. ^ Merino, Julio (20 April 2020). "La historia de UCD a través de Landelino Lavilla, uno de los hombres clave de la Transición". El Cierre Digital (in Spanish). Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  6. ^ "3. Partidos políticos que integraron "Unión de Centro Democrático"". Ministry of the Interior (in Spanish). Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  7. ^ "La victoria de UCD (167 escaños) sitúa a Suárez en condiciones de formar un Gobierno monocolor". El País (in Spanish). 3 March 1979. Retrieved 5 January 2020.
  8. ^ "Se crea la Subdirección General de Medios de Comunicación". El País (in Spanish). 1 September 1977. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  9. ^ a b c "Real Decreto 2258/1977, de 27 de agosto, sobre estructura orgánica y funciones del Ministerio de Cultura" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). Agencia Estatal Boletín Oficial del Estado (209): 19581–19584. 1 September 1977. ISSN 0212-033X.
  10. ^ "Camuñas abandona el Gobierno". El País (in Spanish). 28 September 1977. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  11. ^ "Un síntoma de la crisis". El País (in Spanish). 29 September 1977. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  12. ^ "Suárez quiere neutralizar la crisis gubernamental por unos días". El País (in Spanish). 29 September 1977. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  13. ^ "Leopoldo Calvo Sotelo será nombrado hoy ministro para Europa". El País (in Spanish). 10 February 1978. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  14. ^ "Calvo Sotelo, ministro para las Relaciones con la CEE". El País (in Spanish). 11 February 1978. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  15. ^ "Se confirma la crisis de Gobierno". El País (in Spanish). 26 October 1977. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  16. ^ a b "Fernando Abril asume el Ministerio de Economía y cambian cuatro ministros del Gabinete". El País (in Spanish). 25 February 1978. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  17. ^ "Martín Villa se hace cargo de Justicia". El País (in Spanish). 23 March 2019. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  18. ^ "Adolfo Suárez aprobó la reforma administrativa por simple decreto". El País (in Spanish). 5 July 1977. Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  19. ^ a b c d "Gobiernos por legislaturas. Legislatura Constituyente". lamoncloa.gob.es (in Spanish). Retrieved 4 January 2020.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Real Decreto 1563/1977, de 4 de julio, por el que se nombran Ministros del Gobierno" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). Agencia Estatal Boletín Oficial del Estado (159): 15045–15046. 5 July 1977. ISSN 0212-033X.
  21. ^ a b "Real Decreto 1562/1977, de 4 de julio, por el que se nombran Vicepresidentes del Gobierno a don Enrique Fuentes Quintana y don Fernando Abril Martorell" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). Agencia Estatal Boletín Oficial del Estado (159): 15045. 5 July 1977. ISSN 0212-033X.
  22. ^ "Real Decreto 2521/1977, de 29 de septiembre, por el que se dispone el cese de don Ignacio Camuñas Solís como Ministro adjunto para las Relaciones con las Cortes" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). Agencia Estatal Boletín Oficial del Estado (234): 21774. 30 September 1977. ISSN 0212-033X.
  23. ^ "Real Decreto 228/1978, de 24 de febrero, por el que se dispone el cese del Vicepresidente tercero del Gobierno, don Fernando Abril Martorell" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). Agencia Estatal Boletín Oficial del Estado (48): 4612. 25 February 1978. ISSN 0212-033X.
  24. ^ "Real Decreto 230/1978, de 24 de febrero, por el que se nombra Vicepresidente segundo del Gobierno a don Fernando Abril Martorell" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). Agencia Estatal Boletín Oficial del Estado (48): 4613. 25 February 1978. ISSN 0212-033X.
  25. ^ a b c d e "Real Decreto 231/1978, de 24 de febrero, por el que se nombran Ministros del Gobierno" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). Agencia Estatal Boletín Oficial del Estado (48): 4613. 25 February 1978. ISSN 0212-033X.
  26. ^ "Real Decreto 135/1978, de 10 de febrero, por el que se nombra Ministro para las Relaciones con las Comunidades Europeas, sin cartera, a don Leopoldo Calvo-Sotelo y Bustelo" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). Agencia Estatal Boletín Oficial del Estado (36): 3437. 11 February 1978. ISSN 0212-033X.
  27. ^ "Real Decreto 548/1979, de 22 de marzo, por el que se dispone el cese en sus funciones del Ministro de Justicia, don Landelino Lavilla Alsina" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). Agencia Estatal Boletín Oficial del Estado (71): 7119. 23 March 2019. ISSN 0212-033X.

BibliographyEdit

External linksEdit

Preceded by Government of Spain
1977–1979
Succeeded by