Ministry of Economy (Spain)

The Ministry of Economic Affairs and Digital Transformation (MINECO) is the department of the Government of Spain responsible for the proposing and carrying out the government policy on economic affairs, business support and reforms to improve economic potential growth as well as acting as the communication channel with the European Union and other economic and financial international organizations in this matters.[3] Likewise, this department is responsible for the telecommunications policy and the digital transformation.[3]

Ministry of Economic Affairs and Digital Transformation
Ministerio de Asuntos Económicos y Transformación Digital
Logotipo del Ministerio de Asuntos Económicos y Transformación Digital.svg
Ministerio de Industria, Turismo y Comercio de España (Madrid) 01.jpg
Headquarters of the Ministry in the Nuevos Ministerios government complex.
Agency overview
Formed4 November 1928; 93 years ago (1928-11-04)
(as Ministry of National Economy)
13 January 2020 (as Ministry of Economic Affairs and Digital Transformation)
TypeMinistry
JurisdictionSpanish government
Employees4,940 (2019)[1]
Annual budget 9 billion, 2021[2]
Minister responsible
Agency executives
  • Gonzalo García Andrés, Secretary of State for Economy and Business Support
  • Roberto Sánchez, Secretary of State for Telecommunications
  • Amparo López Senovilla, Secretary of State for Digitization and Artificial Intelligence
  • Amparo López Senovilla, Under Secretary
WebsiteMinistry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness(in Spanish)

This has been a ministry that for most of its history has been linked to the Ministry of the Treasury, including a large part of the democratic stage, although they are now separated.

The MINECO is headed by the Economy Minister, a Cabinet member who is appointed by the Monarch at request of the Prime Minister, after hearing the Council of Ministers. The Minister of Economy and Business is assisted by five high-ranking officials, the Secretary of State for Economy and Business Support, the Secretary of State for Telecommunications and Digital Infraestructures, the Secretary of State for Digitization and Artificial Intelligence the Secretary General for the Treasury and International Financing and the Under Secretary of Economic Affairs. The current minister is Deputy PM Nadia Calviño, a former EU Civil Servant in charge of the EU Budget.

HistoryEdit

Origin and protectionismEdit

The responsibilities over the economy had been integrated in the Ministry of the Treasury since its creation in the 18th century. However, because of the weakness and the deficiencies of the Spanish industry and trade sectors, during the dictatorship of Miguel Primo de Rivera was needed an autarchic policy. In addition, after the World War I the complexity of international markets had plunged Spain into a strong industrial crisis.

As a result, the sectors affected demanded a protectionist tariff policy in defense of national production against foreign one and, in turn, make it easy the exports. Thus began an autarchic policy based on economic nationalism and tariff protectionism whose best example is the Cambó tariff of 1922. This policy was assumed by the dictatorship of Primo de Rivera. Thus a certain economic bonanza was achieved that was truncated by the Great Depression of 1929.

The Cambo tariff was the technical and fiscal response to the critical deficit situation of the Spanish trade balance since 1920. It was a tariff policy that served two competing needs: one was to protect the different sectors of the Spanish economy against the international, heavily taxing imports of products produced by foreign counterparts; another responded to the need to defend export agriculture, a sector with a large foreign market and which was damaged by the rise in tariffs, victim of the consequent increases in the countries affected by the Spanish measures.

This was solved with the signing of international treaties of Commerce and Navigation agreeing a particular and significant reduction of the tariff with each one of the foreign nations with which commercial exchanges took place. Flores de Lemus defined the situation that was lucidly created: there was a complementarity between export agriculture and agriculture and industry in need of protection, although the instruments used by the Government were opposed and a continuous tension was created between them.

Dictatorship, Republic and Civil WarEdit

Although remote antecedents of the Economy portfolio can be found in the creation of the Ministry of Supply as an immediate consequence of the crisis of 1917; The first step towards the creation of a specific department occurred during the dictatorship of Primo de Rivera when the National Economy Council established by Royal Decree of 8 March 1924.[4]

The council was born with the purpose of studying the problems of the national production and consumption, for the purpose of setting the customs tariffs and determining the way to establish international commercial relations adapted to the Spanish economic reality. For this reason, its main functions were to collect statistics on foreign trade and cabotage; obtain economic and commercial information in Spain and abroad; establish the official valuation of the goods, taking into account the cost of the same; propose new customs tariffs, as well as the revision of nomenclatures and tariffs. It was also responsible for proposing the conclusion of Trade Agreements. Finally, this body served to control all pressure groups in the country and thus channel their antagonistic interests: Boards and chambers of Commerce, Industry and Navigation, associations of producers, employers' organizations and trade unions of all kinds.

The end of the Military Directorate in 1925, the restoration of the ministerial regime and the economic circumstances led to the creation of the Ministry of National Economy by Royal Decree-Law of 3 November 1928, in response to public opinion that this affairs required to be placed under one direction only, both in terms of production, trade and consumption; and that to date they were dispersed among the rest of the government departments. The National Economy Council depended on the new Economy Ministry, although slightly modified, continuing with its work of collecting and contrasting the realities of the country around each and every one of the sectors of his economic life.

The Ministry was also integrated by the following organisms:

  • The Ministry of Development transferred to it the Directorate-General for Agriculture, with the agricultural chambers, agronomic council and association of Cattle Ranchers and the services of Hygiene and Animal Health.
  • The Office of the Prime Minister transferred to it the National Economy Council and Directorate-General for Tariffs and Valuations, whose holder was the Vice President of the council.
  • From the Ministries of Labor and Interior, it were transferred respectively the responsibilities on Commerce and Supply, which met in the same Directorate-General for Trade and Supply.
  • The Ministry of Labour also transferred to it the Directorate-General for Industry, with the School of Industrial Engineers, as well as provincial inspectorates.

During this period, its headquarters were in the same building as the Ministry of Development, with the exception of the National Economy Council, which was located on Magdalena Street, 12 in Madrid.

The Ministry disappeared by Decree of 16 December 1931. Its services were distributed among the Ministries of Agriculture, Industry and Commerce; Development and Labour. The National Economy Council was transformed into the National Economy Planning Council, dependent on the portfolio of Industry and Commerce.

In the middle of the Civil War, the government of the Republic created a Ministry of Finance and Economy, first based in Barcelona and then in Valencia. The head of the new institution was Juan Negrín, who at the same time was Prime Minister. Its creation was ordered by Decree of 17 May 1937[5] and its functions and structure were dictated by Decree 27 of that same month.

From the economic autarky to the developmentalism of the 1960sEdit

The catastrophic situation in which the country was plunged after the Civil War and the collapse of international markets caused by the World War II, led to the creation of a new National Economy Council. The new body monitored that all ministries follow the economic guidelines of the Government in a harmonious and coordinated manner. His legal regime constituted him as an autonomous body of work, consultant, adviser and technician in all the matters that affected the national economy. It depended directly on the Office of the Prime Minister.

The importance of the council will be increased, so much that institutionally its president will be compared to those of the Cortes, the Supreme Court , the Court of Auditors and the Council of State. Its power and influence in economic matters, always oriented towards autarky, will be equal to that of the General Secretariat of the Movement. Finally, the President of the council had the rank of Minister without portfolio. Its connection to the most immobile sector of the regime in terms of economy will mean the beginning of its decline. Confronted openly with the Ministries of the Treasury and Commerce for the turn that the Stabilization Plan had made towards a capitalist economy, the National Economy Council gradually began to lose importance in the 1960s. It disappeared in 1977, absorbed by the Ministry of Economy.

During the premiership of Arias Navarro, a specific Deputy Prime Minister was created for economic affairs, a position that was assumed by the head of the Treasury portfolio. The new position implied the disappearance of the Ministry of Development Planning, leaving its Undersecretariat ascribed to the Delegate Commission of the Government for Economic Affairs.

DemocracyEdit

 
Nadia Calviño, Economy Minister since 7 June 2018.

The recovery of the Ministry of Economy in 1977 takes place in conjunctural circumstances and of great importance for the economic history of Spain. Once the political transition to democracy began, the second government presided over by Suarez was aware that the constitutional process would be seriously hampered if there was no economic growth. The circumstances were totally contrary due to the serious situation that the country was going through due to the oil crisis of 1973, the ineffectiveness of the measures adopted by the last governments of the dictatorship; as well as the accentuation of the latent problems: inflation, unemployment, external deficit, deficit of the public sector and the low level of investments.

The institutional solutions involved remodeling the General State Administration, creating a Second Deputy Prime Minister for economic affairs and the position of Minister of Economy through several royal decrees signed on 4 July 1977,[6] appointments that fall in Fuentes Quintana. With the Ministry of Economy recovered, the necessary body is created to group in a single department the different competences in the matter of organization and economic planning and to be able to single out the decisions on economic policy extracting them in part from the Ministry of the Treasury. Its main task was to establish the guidelines of the general economic policy, the short and medium term programming and the study of the proposal of advisable measures to ensure the smooth running of the economy of the country. During the last government of Suarez were merged into one, the Economy and Commerce portfolios.

The administrative reforms carried out by the first government headed by Felipe González led in 1982 to the merger in one of the departments of Treasury and Economy and Commerce, giving birth to the Ministry of Economy and Finance. This body has continued to operate continuously with the exception of the 7th Cortes Generales (2000-2004), under the premiership of José María Aznar, in which the Treasury and Economy portfolios were split in two. The same happens since the 10th Cortes Generales (2011–present). Between 2016 and 2018, the Ministry of Economy merged with the Ministry of Industry.[7]

StructureEdit

The Ministry of Economy and Business is organised in the following superior bodies:[8]

  • The Secretariat of State for Economy and Business Support
  • The Secretariat of State for Digitalization and Artificial Intelligence
    • The General Secretariat for Digital Administration
    • The Directorate-General for Digitalization and Artificial Intelligence
  • The Secretariat of State for Telecommunications and Digital Infrastructures
    • The Directorate-General for Telecommunications and Organization of Audiovisual Communication Services
  • The Undersecretariat of Economic Affairs and Digital Transformation
    • The Technical General Secretariat
    • The Inspectorate of Services
    • The Deputy Directorate-General for Human Resources
    • The Deputy Directorate-General for Financial Administration and Administrative Office
    • The Budget Office
    • The Deputy Directorate-General for Information and Communication Technologies

Ministry agenciesEdit

List of Ministers of Economy and Finance of SpainEdit

Period Took office Left office Name Party
Reign of
Philip V
2 April 1717 1 December 1720 José Rodrigo y Villalpando (9)
17 December 1720 14 January 1724 Juan de Dios del Río González (8)
Reign of Louis I 24 January 1724 4 September 1724 Fernando Verdes Montenegro (8)
Reign
of
Philip V
4 September 1724 12 December 1725 Juan Bautista de Orendain Azpilicueta (8)
12 December 1725 1726 Juan Guillermo Ripperdá (8)
1726 14 May 1726 Francisco de Arriaza Medina (8)
14 May 1726 3 November 1726 Juan Bautista de Orendain Azpilicueta (8)
3 November 1726 23 November 1736 José Patiño Rosales (8)
23 November 1736 10 March 1739 Mateo Pablo Díaz de Lavandero (8)
10 March 1739 13 January 1740 Juan Bautista de Iturralde Gamio (8)
13 January 1740 27 February 1741 Fernando Verdes Montenegro (8)
27 September 1741 11 April 1743 José del Campillo y Cossío (7)
Reign of
Ferdinand VI
21 May 1743 22 July 1754 Zenón de Somodevilla y Bengoechea (7)
22 July 1754 8 December 1759 Juan Francisco Ruiz de Gaona y Portocarrero (7)
Reign
of
Charles III
25 December 1759 1 April 1766 Leopoldo de Gregorio, Marquess of Esquilace (7)
1 April 1766 25 January 1785 Miguel de Múzquiz y Goyeneche (7)
25 January 1785 16 October 1791 Pedro López de Lerena (7)
Reign
of
Charles IV
16 October 1791 28 October 1796 Diego de Gardoqui (7)
28 October 1796 10 June 1797 Pedro de Varela Ulloa (7)
27 June 1797 21 November 1797 Nicolás Ambrosio Garro y Arizcun (7)
21 November 1797 6 September 1798 Francisco Saavedra de Sangronis (7)
6 September 1798 28 March 1808 Miguel Cayetano Soler Ravasa (7)
Reign
of
Joseph I
28 March 1808 7 July 1808 Miguel José Azanza y Alegría (7)
7 July 1808 27 April 1810 Francisco Cabarrús (7)
26 April 1810 7 August 1810 José Martínez de Hervás (7) Interim
7 August 1810 31 August 1810 Gonzalo O'Farril Herrera (7) Interim
31 August 1810 27 June 1813 Francisco Angulo (7)
Supreme Central and Governing Junta of the Kingdom 15 October 1808 30 October 1809 Francisco Saavedra de Sangronis (7)
2 November 1809 2 June 1810 Nicolás Ambrosio Garro y Arizcun (7)
2 July 1810 13 November 1810 Nicolás María Sierra (7)
13 November 1810 14 January 1811 José Company (7)
14 January 1811 6 February 1812 José Canga-Argüelles (7)
6 February 1812 22 April 1812 Antonio Ranz Romanillos (7)
22 April 1812 23 June 1812 José Vázquez de Figueroa (7)
23 June 1812 1 October 1812 Luis María Salazar (7)
1 October 1812 30 March 1813 Cristóbal Góngora Fernández Delgado (7)
30 March 1813 24 August 1813 Tomás José González-Carvajal (7)
24 August 1813 4 May 1814 Julián Fernández Navarrete y Jiménez de Tejada (7) Interim
Reign
of
Ferdinand
VII
4 May 1814 29 May 1814 Luis María Salazar (7)
29 May 1814 23 September 1814 Cristóbal Góngora Fernández Delgado (7)
23 September 1814 2 February 1815 Juan Pérez Villaamil (7) Interim
2 February 1815 10 December 1815 Philip González Vallejo (7)
21 April 1815 10 December 1815 Francisco García Luna Peinado (7) Oficial habilitado.
10 December 1815 27 January 1816 José Ibarra Mateo (7)
27 January 1816 23 December 1816 Manuel López Araujo (7)
23 December 1816 14 September 1818 Martín de Garay Perales (7) Interim
14 September 1818 3 September 1819 José Imaz Baquedano (7)
3 November 1819 22 March 1820 Antonio González Salmón (7)
22 March 1820 2 March 1821 José Canga Argüelles (7)
2 March 1821 4 March 1821 Luis Sorela Carcaño (7) Interim
4 March 1821 31 October 1821 Antonio Barata Barata (7)
31 October 1821 8 January 1822 Ángel Vallejo Villalón (7) Interim
8 January 1822 11 January 1822 José Imaz Baquedano (7) Interim
11 January 1822 24 January 1822 Luis Sorela Carcaño (7) Interim
24 January 1822 30 January 1822 Luis López Ballesteros Varela (7)
30 January 1822 28 February 1822 Luis Sorela Carcaño (7) Interim
28 February 1822 5 August 1822 Philip Sierra Pambley (7)
5 August 1822 6 August 1822 Antonio Martínez Martínez (7)
6 August 1822 28 April 1823 Mariano Egea (7) Interim
28 February 1823 20 April 1823 Lorenzo Calvo de Rozas (7)
28 April 1823 12 May 1823 Manuel Cortés Aragón (7) Interim
13 May 1823 30 September 1823 Juan Antonio Yandiola Garay (7)
26 May 1823 2 December 1823 Juan Bautista Erro y Azpiroz (7)
2 December 1823 30 September 1832 Luis López Ballesteros Varela (7)
1 October 1832 24 March 1833 Victoriano de Encima (7)
25 March 1833 27 December 1833 Antonio Martínez Martínez (7)
Regency
of
Maria Christina of the Two Sicilies
27 December 1833 15 January 1834 Francisco Javier de Burgos Olmo (7) Interim
15 January 1834 7 February 1834 José Aranalde Gorbieta (7) Interim
7 February 1834 18 June 1834 José Imaz Baquedano (7)
18 June 1834 13 June 1835 José María Queipo de Llano (7)
13 June 1835 15 May 1836 Juan Álvarez Mendizábal
15 May 1836 14 August 1836 José Ventura de Aguirre Solarte (7)
14 August 1836 11 September 1836 Mariano Egea (7)
11 September 1836 18 August 1837 Juan Álvarez Mendizábal (7)
27 March 1837 9 July 1837 Pío Pita Pizarro (7)
1 October 1837 7 October 1837 José María Pérez Quintana (7) Interim
16 December 1837 6 September 1838 Alejandro Mon y Menéndez (7)
6 September 1838 21 November 1838 José Vigil de Quiñones de León (7) Interim through 9 September
6 December 1838 10 May 1839 Pío Pita Pizarro (7)
10 May 1839 12 May 1839 José Ferraz y Cornel (7) Interim
12 May 1839 19 August 1839 Domingo Jiménez (7) Interim
19 August 1839 20 August 1839 José Ferraz y Cornel (7) Interim
20 August 1839 3 September 1839 José Primo de Rivera Ortiz de Pinedo (7) Interim
3 September 1839 8 April 1840 José San Millán Coronel (7)
8 April 1840 20 July 1840 Ramón de Santillán González (7)
20 July 1840 19 August 1840 José Ferraz y Cornel (7)
19 August 1840 11 September 1840 José María Secades del Rivero (7) Interim
11 September 1840 16 September 1840 Domingo Jiménez (7)
Reign of Isabella II 3 October 1840 6 March 1841 Agustín Fernández Gamboa (7)
6 March 1841 20 May 1841 Joaquín María Ferrer Cafranga (7) Interim
21 May 1841 25 May 1842 Pedro Surrá y Rull (7)
26 May 1842 17 June 1842 Antonio María del Valle (7) Interim
17 June 1842 9 May 1843 Ramón María Calatrava Peinado (7)
9 May 1843 19 May 1843 Mateo Miguel Ayllón Alonso (7)
19 May 1843 30 July 1843 Juan Álvarez Mendizábal (7)
24 July 1843 5 November 1843 Mateo Miguel Ayllón Alonso (7)
24 November 1843 1 December 1843 Manuel Cantero San Vicente (7)
1 December 1843 10 December 1843 José Díaz de Serralde (7) Interim
10 December 1843 3 May 1844 Juan José García Carrasco Gómez Benítez (7)
Década
Moderada
3 May 1844 12 February 1846 Alejandro Mon y Menéndez (7)
12 February 1846 15 February 1846 Manuel María Sierra Moya (7) Interim
15 February 1846 16 March 1846 José de la Peña y Aguayo (7)
16 March 1846 4 April 1846 Francisco de Paula Orlando (7)
5 April 1846 12 April 1846 Manuel María Sierra Moya (7) Interim
12 April 1846 28 January 1847 Alejandro Mon y Menéndez (7)
28 January 1847 28 March 1847 Ramón de Santillán González (7)
28 March 1847 4 October 1847 José de Salamanca y Mayol (7)
4 October 1847 24 December 1847 Francisco de Paula Orlando (7)
24 December 1847 15 June 1848 Manuel Bertrán de Lis y Ribes (7)
15 June 1848 11 August 1848 Francisco de Paula Orlando (7)
11 August 1848 19 August 1849 Alejandro Mon y Menéndez (7)
19 August 1849 18 October 1849 Juan Bravo Murillo (7) Interim through 31 August
19 October 1849 20 October 1849 Vicente Armesto Hernández (7)
20 October 1849 29 November 1850 Juan Bravo Murillo (5)
29 November 1850 14 January 1851 Manuel Seijas Lozano (5)
14 January 1851 14 December 1852 Juan Bravo Murillo (5)
14 December 1852 10 January 1853 Gabriel Aristizábal Reutt (5)
10 January 1853 14 April 1853 Alejandro Llorente y Lannas (5)
14 April 1853 21 June 1853 Manuel Bermúdez de Castro y Díez (5)
21 June 1853 19 September 1853 Luis María Pastor Copo (5)
19 September 1853 17 July 1854 Jacinto Félix Domenech (5)
Bienio
Progresista
18 July 1854 20 July 1854 Manuel Cantero San Vicente (5)
30 July 1854 28 December 1854 José Manuel Collado y Parada (5)
28 December 1854 21 January 1855 Juan Mata Sevillano Fraile (5)
21 January 1855 6 June 1855 Pascual Madoz Ibáñez (5)
6 June 1855 7 February 1856 Juan Faustino Bruil Olliarburu (5)
7 February 1856 14 July 1856 Francisco Santa Cruz (5)
Reign of Isabella II 14 July 1856 20 September 1856 Manuel Cantero San Vicente (5)
20 September 1856 12 October 1856 Pedro Salaverría Charitu (5)
12 October 1856 15 October 1857 Manuel García Barzanallana (5)
15 October 1857 25 October 1857 Victorio Fernández Lascoiti Fourquet (5) Interim
25 October 1857 14 January 1858 Alejandro Mon y Menéndez (5)
14 January 1858 30 June 1858 José Sánchez Ocaña López Ontiveros (5)
30 June 1858 2 March 1863 Pedro Salaverría Charitu (5)
2 March 1863 4 August 1863 José de Sierra Cárdenas (5)
4 August 1863 13 October 1863 Manuel Moreno López (5)
13 October 1863 17 January 1864 Victorio Fernández Lascoiti Fourquet (5)
17 January 1864 1 March 1864 Juan Bautista Trupita Jiménez Cisneros (5)
1 March 1864 16 September 1864 Pedro Salaverría Charitu (5)
16 September 1864 20 February 1865 Manuel García Barzanallana (5)
20 February 1865 21 June 1865 Alejandro de Castro Casal (5)
21 June 1865 28 May 1866 Manuel Alonso Martínez (5)
28 May 1866 10 July 1866 Antonio Cánovas del Castillo (5) Interim
10 July 1866 10 February 1868 Manuel García Barzanallana (5)
10 February 1868 23 April 1868 José Sánchez Ocaña López Ontiveros (5)
23 April 1868 30 September 1868 Manuel Orovio Echagüe (5)
Sexenio
Democrático
20 September 1868 30 September 1868 José Magaz y Jaime (5) Interim
8 October 1868 13 July 1869 Laureano Figuerola Ballester (5)
13 July 1869 1 November 1869 Constantino de Ardanaz y Undabarrena (5)
1 November 1869 2 December 1870 Laureano Figuerola Ballester (5)
2 December 1870 10 July 1871 Segismundo Moret y Prendergast (5)
10 July 1871 24 July 1871 Práxedes Mateo Sagasta (5) Interim
24 July 1871 5 October 1871 Servando Ruiz-Gómez y González-Llanos (5)
5 October 1871 20 February 1872 Santiago de Angulo Ortiz de Traspeña (5)
20 February 1872 26 May 1872 Juan Francisco Camacho de Alcorta (5)
26 May 1872 13 June 1872 José Elduayen Gorriti (5)
13 June 1872 19 December 1872 Servando Ruiz-Gómez y González-Llanos (5)
19 December 1872 12 February 1873 José Echegaray Eizaguirre (5)
I Republic
(1873–1874)
12 February 1873 24 February 1873 José Echegaray Eizaguirre (5)
24 February 1873 11 June 1873 Juan Tutau y Verges (5)
11 June 1873 28 June 1873 Teodoro Ladico y Font (5)
28 June 1873 4 September 1873 José Carvajal Hué (5)
8 September 1873 3 January 1874 Manuel Pedregal y Cañedo (5)
3 January 1874 4 January 1874 Práxedes Mateo Sagasta (5)
4 January 1874 13 May 1874 José Echegaray Eizaguirre (5)
13 May 1874 31 December 1874 Juan Francisco Camacho de Alcorta (5)
Reign of
Alfonso XII
(1874–1885)
31 December 1874 20 July 1876 Pedro Salaverría y Charitu (5)
20 July 1876 11 July 1877 José García Barzanallana (5)
11 July 1877 19 March 1880 Manuel Orovio Echagüe (5)
19 March 1880 8 February 1881 Fernando Cos-Gayón y Pons (5)
8 February 1881 9 January 1883 Juan Francisco Camacho de Alcorta (5)
9 January 1883 13 October 1883 Justo Pelayo de la Cuesta Núñez (5)
13 October 1883 18 January 1884 José Gallostra y Frau (5)
18 January 1884 27 November 1885 Fernando Cos-Gayón y Pons (5)
Regency of
María Cristina
for Alfonso XIII
(1885–1902)
27 November 1885 2 August 1886 Juan Francisco Camacho de Alcorta (5)
2 August 1886 11 December 1888 Joaquín López Puigcerver (5)
11 December 1888 21 January 1890 Venancio González y Fernández (5)
21 January 1890 5 July 1890 Manuel de Eguilior y Llaguno (5)
5 July 1890 23 November 1891 Fernando Cos-Gayón y Pons (5)
23 November 1891 11 December 1892 Juan de la Concha Castañeda (5)
11 December 1892 12 March 1894 Germán Gamazo y Calvo (5)
12 March 1894 17 December 1894 Amós Salvador Rodrigáñez (5)
17 December 1894 23 March 1895 José Canalejas Méndez (5)
23 March 1895 4 October 1897 Juan Navarro Reverter (5)
4 October 1897 4 March 1899 Joaquín López Puigcerver (5)
4 March 1899 6 July 1900 Raimundo Fernández Villaverde (5)
6 July 1900 6 March 1901 Manuel Allendesalazar Muñoz (5)
6 March 1901 19 March 1902 Ángel Urzáiz y Cuesta (5)
19 March 1902 17 May 1902 Tirso Rodrigáñez y Sagasta (5)
Reign of
Alfonso XIII
(1902–1931)
17 May 1902 15 November 1902 Tirso Rodrigáñez y Sagasta (5)
15 November 1902 6 December 1902 Manuel de Eguilior y Llaguno (5)
6 December 1902 25 March 1903 Raimundo Fernández Villaverde (5)
25 March 1903 20 July 1903 Faustino Rodríguez San Pedro (5)
20 July 1903 5 December 1903 Augusto González Besada Mein (5)
5 December 1903 16 December 1904 Guillermo de Osma y Scull (5)
16 December 1904 27 January 1905 Tomás Castellano y Villarroya (5)
27 January 1905 23 June 1905 Antonio García Alix (5)
23 June 1905 18 July 1905 Ángel Urzáiz y Cuesta (5)
18 July 1905 1 December 1905 José Echegaray Eizaguirre (5)
1 December 1905 6 July 1906 Amós Salvador Rodrigáñez (5)
6 July 1906 30 November 1906 Juan Navarro Reverter (5)
30 November 1906 4 December 1906 Eleuterio Delgado y Martín (5)
4 December 1906 25 January 1907 Juan Navarro Reverter (5)
25 January 1907 23 February 1908 Guillermo de Osma y Scull (5)
23 February 1908 14 September 1908 Cayetano Sánchez Bustillo (5)
14 September 1908 21 October 1909 Augusto González Besada Mein (5)
21 October 1909 9 February 1910 Juan Alvarado y del Saz (5)
9 February 1910 3 April 1911 Eduardo Cobián y Roffignac (5)
3 April 1911 12 March 1912 Tirso Rodrigáñez y Sagasta (5)
12 March 1912 31 December 1912 Juan Navarro Reverter (5)
31 December 1912 27 October 1913 Félix Suárez Inclán (5)
27 October 1913 9 December 1915 Gabino Bugallal Araújo (5)
9 December 1915 25 February 1916 Ángel Urzáiz y Cuesta (5)
25 February 1916 30 April 1916 Miguel Villanueva y Gómez (5)
30 April 1916 11 June 1917 Santiago Alba Bonifaz (5)
11 June 1917 3 November 1917 Gabino Bugallal Araújo (5)
3 November 1917 2 March 1918 Juan Ventosa Calvell (5)
2 March 1918 22 March 1918 José de Caralt y Sala (5)
22 March 1918 9 November 1918 Augusto González Besada Mein (5)
9 November 1918 5 December 1918 Santiago Alba Bonifaz (5)
5 December 1918 5 February 1919 Fermín Calbetón y Blanchón (5)
5 February 1919 15 April 1919 José Gómez Acebo (5)
15 April 1919 20 July 1919 Juan de la Cierva y Peñafiel (5)
20 July 1919 5 May 1920 Gabino Bugallal Araújo (5)
5 May 1920 28 January 1921 Lorenzo Domínguez Pascual (5)
28 January 1921 7 July 1921 Manuel Argüelles Argüelles (5)
7 July 1921 14 August 1921 Mariano Ordóñez García (5)
14 August 1921 8 March 1922 Francesc Cambó i Batlle (5)
8 March 1922 4 December 1922 Francisco Bergamín García (5)
4 December 1922 7 December 1922 Juan José Ruano de la Sota (5)
7 December 1922 4 April 1923 José Manuel Pedregal y Sánchez Calvo (5)
4 April 1923 3 September 1923 Miguel Villanueva y Gómez (5)
3 September 1923 15 September 1923 Félix Suárez Inclán (5)
17 September 1923 21 December 1923 Enrique Illana y Sánchez de Vargas (5)
21 December 1923 5 February 1924 Carlos Vergara Caillaux (5)
25 February 1924 21 December 1925 José Corral y Larre (5)
31 December 1925 3 November 1928 José Calvo Sotelo (5)
3 November 1928 21 January 1930 José Calvo Sotelo (5)
and Francisco Moreno Zulueta (6)
21 January 1930 30 January 1930 Francisco Moreno Zulueta (5)
and Sebastian Castedo Palero (6)
30 January 1930 3 February 1930 Manuel Argüelles Argüelles (5, 6)
3 February 1930 20 August 1930 Manuel Argüelles Argüelles (5)
and Julio Wais San Martín (6)
20 August 1930 18 February 1931 Julio Wais San Martín (5)
and Luis Rodríguez de Viguri (6)
18 February 1931 14 April 1931 Juan Ventosa Calvell (5)
and Gabino Bugallal Araújo (6)
II Republic
(1931–1939)
14 April 1931 16 December 1931 Indalecio Prieto Tuero PSOE
16 December 1931 12 June 1933 Jaime Carner Romeu ERC
12 June 1933 12 September 1933 Agustín Viñuales Pardo Indep.
12 September 1933 3 May 1934 Antonio Lara Zárate PRR
3 May 1934 3 April 1935 Manuel Marraco Ramón PRR
3 April 1935 6 May 1935 Alfredo de Zavala y Lafora PRP
6 May 1935 30 December 1935 Joaquín Chapaprieta Torregrosa Indep.
30 December 1935 19 February 1936 Manuel Rico Avelló Indep.
19 February 1936 13 May 1936 Gabriel Franco López IR
13 May 1936 4 September 1936 Enrique Ramos Ramos IR
4 September 1936 5 April 1938 Juan Negrín López PSOE
5 April 1938 1 April 1939 Francisco Méndez Aspe IR
Francoism
(1936–1975)
3 October 1936 9 August 1939 Andrés Amado Reygondaud
9 August 1939 20 May 1941 José Larraz López
20 May 1941 18 July 1951 Joaquín Benjumea Burín
18 July 1951 25 February 1957 Francisco Gómez de Llano
25 February 1957 7 July 1965 Mariano Navarro Rubio
7 July 1965 29 October 1969 Juan José Espinosa San Martín
29 October 1969 9 June 1973 Alberto Monreal Luque
9 June 1973 29 October 1974 Antonio Barrera de Irimo
29 October 1974 12 December 1975 Rafael Cabello de Alba Gracia
Reign of
Juan Carlos I
(1975-2014)
12 December 1975 5 July 1976 Juan-Miguel Villar Mir
5 July 1976 4 July 1977 Eduardo Carriles Galarraga
4 July 1977 25 February 1978 Francisco Fernández Ordóñez
and Enrique Fuentes Quintana (1)
UCD Cst. (Suárez)
25 February 1978 6 April 1979 Francisco Fernández Ordóñez
and Fernando Abril Martorell (2)
UCD
6 April 1979 8 September 1980 Jaime García Añoveros
and Fernando Abril Martorell (1)
and José Luis Leal Maldonado (2)
UCD I (Suárez/Calvo-Sotelo)
8 September 1980 2 December 1982 Jaime García Añoveros
and Leopoldo Calvo-Sotelo (1) until 26 February 1981
and Juan Antonio García Díez (3, 2)
UCD
3 December 1982 6 July 1985 Miguel Boyer Salvador (4) PSOE II (González)
6 July 1985 13 July 1993 Carlos Solchaga Catalán (4) PSOE II • III • IV (González)
14 July 1993 5 May 1996 Pedro Solbes Mira (4) PSOE V (González)
6 May 1996 28 April 2000 Rodrigo Rato Figaredo (4) PP VI (Aznar)
28 April 2000 17 April 2004 Rodrigo Rato Figaredo (2)
and Cristóbal Montoro Romero (5)
PP VII (Aznar)
18 April 2004 7 April 2009 Pedro Solbes Mira (4) PSOE VIIIIX (Zapatero)
7 April 2009 22 December 2011 Elena Salgado Méndez[9] (4) PSOE IX (Zapatero)
Reign of
Felipe VI
(since 2014)
22 December 2011 1 June 2018 Luis de Guindos Jurado (2)
and Cristóbal Montoro Romero (5)[10]
PP X, XI and XII (Rajoy)
7 June 2018 Incumbent Nadia Calviño (10) Indep. XII (Sánchez)

(1) Minister of Economic Affairs
(2) Minister of the Economy
(3) Minister of the Economy and Commerce
(4) Minister of the Economy and Finance
(5) Minister of Finance
(6) Minister of the National Economy
(7) Secretary of State and of the Universal Bureau of Finance
(8) Secretary of the Universal Bureau of Finance
(9) Secretary of Justice, Political Government and Finance
(10) Minister of Economy and Business

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Ministry of Territorial Policy and Civil Service (2018). Statistical Bulletin of the personnel at the service of the Public Administrations (PDF). p. 48.
  2. ^ "2021 State Budget" (PDF). boe.es. 4 January 2021. Retrieved 6 January 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Royal Decree 403/2020, of February 25, which develops the basic organic structure of the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Digital Transformation". boe.es. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  4. ^ "Royal decree establishing in the Office of the Prime Minister a Council of the National Economy" (PDF).
  5. ^ "Decree providing for the new denomination of the ministerial departments as of the date of the promulgation of this Decree" (PDF).
  6. ^ "Royal Decree 1558/1977, of July 4, by which certain organs of the Central State Administration are restructured". boe.es. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  7. ^ "Royal Decree 415/2016, of November 3, by which the ministerial departments are restructured". boe.es. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  8. ^ "Royal Decree 139/2020, of January 28, which establishes the basic organic structure of the ministerial departments". boe.es. Retrieved 30 January 2020.
  9. ^ "Ángel Gabilondo, Trinidad Jiménez y González-Sinde, principales novedades del Gobierno" [Ángel Gabilondo, Trinidad Jiménez and González-Sinde, the Main Changes to the Government]. El País (in Spanish). 7 April 2009. Archived from the original on 20 July 2018. Retrieved 13 March 2019.
  10. ^ Elordi, Carlos (22 December 2011). "Un Gobierno de amigos y fieles" [A Government of Friends and Loyals]. El País (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 14 September 2018. Retrieved 13 March 2019.