Quaid-e-Azam Trophy

The Quaid-e-Azam Trophy is a domestic first-class cricket competition in Pakistan. With few exceptions, it has been staged annually since it was first played during the 1953/54 season. Domestic cricket in Pakistan has undergone many reorganisations, with the number of teams and matches in the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy changing regularly. Since the 2019–20 season it has been contested by six regional teams, having previously been variously contested by associations[a] or departments,[b] or a combination of the two.[1]

Quaid-e-Azam Trophy
Quaid-e-Azam Trophy tournament logo.png
CountriesPakistan
AdministratorPakistan Cricket Board
FormatFirst-class
First edition1953–54
Latest edition2020–21
Next edition2021–22
Number of teams6
Current championCentral Punjab (2nd title) and
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (1st title)
Most successfulKarachi cricket teams (20 titles)
TVPTV Sports
Websitehttps://www.pcb.com.pk/

HistoryEdit

Named after Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, who was known as 'Quaid-e-Azam' (Great Leader), the trophy was introduced in the 1953-54 season to help the selectors pick the squad for Pakistan's Test tour of England in 1954.[2] Five regional and two departmental teams competed in the first competition: Bahawalpur, Punjab, Karachi, North-West Frontier Province, Sindh, Combined Services and Pakistan Railways.

The Quaid-e-Azam Trophy has been contested by a variety of teams representing regional cricket associations and departments, which were run by companies, institutions and government departments, and offered employment for their players. Most commonly a mixture of the two have competed together, but on many occasions the competition has been contested exclusively by regional or departmental teams. Due to their strength in depth, several regional associations have entered multiple teams, starting in 1956–57 when Karachi, Punjab and East Pakistan each had two teams.[3][4] The competition's format has seldom remained unchanged from one season to the next. It was a knockout tournament for the first two seasons, and again in 1959/60, from 1963/64 to 1968/69, and from 1970/71 to 1978/79. At other times it has been contested in one or more round robin groups with another group stage, knockout or single final match between the top sides in each group, and as a two division league system with a knockout and/or final and promotion and relegation. Even when the system remained constant, the composition of teams from the regions and departments often changed.[3][4] Karachi teams have won the trophy 20 times, the most by any team.

In a major overhaul of domestic cricket in Pakistan, ahead of the 2019–20 season the Pakistan Cricket Board announced a new structure which removed the traditional regions and departments, with six newly formed regional teams contesting the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy.[3]

Structure since 2019–20Edit

On 31 August 2019, the PCB introduced a new structure of the tournament, in which six newly formed regional teams will play a total of thirty-one matches, each team playing ten matches. The teams competing are Balochistan, Central Punjab, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Northern, Sindh and Southern Punjab. On 3 September 2019, the PCB confirmed all of the squads for the tournament.[5][6]

The PCB also updated the playing conditions for the tournament, including removing the mandatory coin toss and the possibility of extending the final by an extra day, if needed. The visiting team's captain will have the choice to bowl first if they wish. If not, then the coin toss will take place as before. This practice has been used in England since the 2016 County Championship season. If the final ends in a draw, the winner will be declared on the basis of a first innings lead. However, if the first innings for both teams have not been completed, an extra day will be used. In the event that both teams do not complete their first innings, they will both be declared the winners of the tournament.[7]

TeamsEdit

Points systemEdit

Points are awarded at the conclusion of each match during the season.

  • Won: 16 points
  • Lost: 0 points
  • Draw: 5 points
  • Tie: 9 points
  • Batting points: First Innings only up to 110 overs – first point at 200 runs, second point at 250 runs, third point at 300 runs, fourth point at 350 runs, fifth point at 400 runs
  • Bowling points: First Innings only up to 110 overs – first point at 3 wickets, second point at 6 wickets, third point at 9 wickets

Winners and competition detailsEdit

Season Winning team(s) Runner-up Number of teams Total
matches
[c]
Format
Tot. Rgn. Dpt.
1953–54 Bahawalpur Punjab 7 5 2 6 knockout; semi-finals
1954–55 Karachi Combined Services 9 7 2 8 knockout; semi-finals
1955–56 Not held
1956–57 Punjab Karachi Whites 13 11 2 18 4 round-robin groups; semi-finals
1957–58 Bahawalpur Karachi C 15 13 2 26 4 round-robin groups; semi-finals
1958–59 Karachi Combined Services 12 9 3 16 4 round-robin groups; semi-finals
1959–60 Karachi Lahore 13 10 3 12 knockout; quarter-finals
1960–61 Not held due to the holding of inaugural Ayub Trophy.[3]
1961–62 Karachi Blues Combined Services 15 13 2 28 4 round-robin groups; semi-finals
1962–63 Karachi A Karachi B 16 13 3 27 4 round-robin groups; semi-finals
1963–64 Karachi Blues Karachi Whites 15 13 2 14 knockout; quarter-finals
1964–65 Karachi Blues Lahore 26 18 8 24 knockout; semi-finals
1965–66 Not held due to the Indo-Pakistani War of 1965.[3]
1966–67 Karachi Pakistan Railways 7 6 1 6 knockout; semi-finals
1967–68 Not held due to the 1966–67 competition extending until November 1967.[3]
1968–69 Lahore Karachi 12 11 1 11 knockout; quarter-finals
1969–70 PIA PWD 20 15 5 34 5 round-robin groups; pre-semi-final
1970–71 Karachi Blues Punjab University 20 11 9 19 knockout; semi-finals
1971–72 Not held due to the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971.
1972–73 Pakistan Railways Sind 7 4 3 6 knockout; semi-finals
1973–74 Pakistan Railways Sind 7 4 3 6 knockout; semi-finals
1974–75 Punjab A Sind A 10 6 4 9 knockout; quarter-finals
1975–76 National Bank Punjab A 10 6 4 9 knockout; quarter-finals
1976–77 United Bank National Bank 12 6 6 11 knockout; quarter-finals
1977–78 Habib Bank National Bank 12 6 6 11 knockout; quarter-finals
1978–79 National Bank Habib Bank 12 4 8 11 knockout; quarter-finals
1979–80 PIA National Bank 11 3 8 18 4 groups; final round-robin
1980–81 United Bank PIA 10 2 8 45 round-robin
1981–82 National Bank United Bank 10 3 7 45 round-robin
1982–83 United Bank National Bank 10 3 7 45 round-robin
1983–84 National Bank United Bank 10 0 10 45 round-robin
1984–85 United Bank Pakistan Railways 12 2 10 33 2 round-robin groups; semi-finals
1985–86 Karachi Pakistan Railways 12 6 6 66 round-robin
1986–87 National Bank United Bank 12 4 8 66 round-robin
1987–88 PIA United Bank 13 4 9 39 2 round-robin groups; semi-finals
1988–89 ADBP Habib Bank 8 0 8 29 round-robin; final
1989–90 PIA United Bank 8 0 8 57 round-robin; final
1990–91 Karachi Whites Bahawalpur 8 8 0 31 round-robin; semi-finals
1991–92 Karachi Whites Lahore 9 9 0 39 round-robin; semi-finals
1992–93 Karachi Whites Sargodha 8 8 0 31 round-robin; semi-finals
1993–94 Lahore Karachi Whites 8 8 0 31 round-robin; semi-finals
1994–95 Karachi Blues Lahore 10 10 0 48 round-robin; semi-finals
1995–96 Karachi Blues Karachi Whites 10 10 0 48 round-robin; semi-finals
1996–97 Lahore Karachi Whites 8 8 0 31 round-robin; semi-finals
1997–98 Karachi Blues Peshawar 10 10 0 46 round-robin; final
1998–99 Peshawar Karachi Whites 11 11 0 56 round-robin; final
1999–00 PIA Habib Bank 23 11 12 122 2 round-robin groups; final
2000–01 Lahore Blues Karachi Whites 12 12 0 67 round-robin; final
2001–02 Karachi Whites Peshawar 18 18 0 73 2 round-robin groups; final
2002–03 PIA KRL 24 13 11 75 4 round-robin groups; pre-quarter-finals
2003–04 Faisalabad Sialkot 9 9 0 36 round-robin
2004–05 Peshawar Faisalabad 11 11 0 56 round-robin; final
2005–06 Sialkot Faisalabad 7 7 0 22 round-robin; final
2006–07 Karachi Urban Sialkot 7 7 0 22 round-robin; final
2007–08 SNGPL Habib Bank 22 13 9 111 2 round-robin groups; final
2008–09 Sialkot KRL 22 13 9 111 2 round-robin groups; final
2009–10 Karachi Blues Habib Bank 22 13 9 111 2 round-robin groups; final
2010–11 Habib Bank PIA 22 13 9 113 2 round-robin divisions; 2 finals
2011–12 PIA ZTBL 22 13 9 113 2 round-robin divisions; 2 finals
2012–13 Karachi Blues Sialkot 14 14 0 62 2 round-robin groups; 4 round-robin pools; 2 finals
2013–14 Rawalpindi Islamabad 14 14 0 61 2 round-robin groups; 4 round-robin pools; final
2014–15 SNGPL National Bank 26 14 12 116 2 divisions: round-robin, then final in Gold; 2 round-robin groups, quarter-finals in Silver
2015–16 SNGPL United Bank 16 8 8 62 2 round-robin groups; 4 round-robin pools; 2 finals
2016–17 WAPDA Habib Bank 16 8 8 69 2 round-robin divisions; 2 round-robin "Super Eight" groups of four; final
2017–18 SNGPL WAPDA 16 8 8 69 2 round-robin divisions; 2 round-robin "Super Eight" groups of four; final
2018–19 Habib Bank SNGPL 16 8 8 69 2 round-robin divisions; 2 round-robin "Super Eight" groups of four; final
2019–20 Central Punjab Northern 6 6 0 31 round-robin; final
2020–21 Central Punjab and
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
n/a[d] 6 6 0 31 round-robin; final

Multiple winnersEdit

Karachi teams have had the most success, winning the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy 20 times. Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) are next with seven wins, followed by National Bank with five. Lahore teams, United Bank, and Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Limited (SNGPL) have four wins each; Habib Bank has 3; and Bahawalpur, Peshawar, Punjab, Railways, Sialkot and Central Punjab (one shared) each have two.

RecordsEdit

Some team and individual records in the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy are listed in the table below:

Record Score/figures Player(s)/team Season/match details
Team records
Highest innings total 951 for 7 declared Sind vs. Balochistan (18 February 1974)[8]
Lowest innings total 29 Dacca University and Education Board vs. Dacca (3 March 1965)[9]
Batting records
Most runs (season) 1,249 Kamran Ghulam (Khyber Pakhtunkhwa) 2020–21 season[10]
Most runs (match) 499 Hanif Mohammad (Karachi) vs. Bahawalpur (8 January 1959)[11][12][13]
Most runs (innings)
Highest partnership 580 (2nd wicket)  Rafatullah Mohmand & Aamer Sajjad (WAPDA) vs. SSGC (3 December 2009)[14]
Bowling records
Best figures (innings) 10 for 28 Naeem Akhtar (Rawalpindi Blues) vs. Peshawar B (2 December 1995)[15]
Best figures (match) 16 for 141 Saad Altaf (Rawalpindi) vs. FATA (2 November 2017)[16][17]
Wicketkeeping records
Most dismissals (match) 12 (all caught) Kashif Mahmood (Lahore Shalimar) vs. Abbottabad (29 October 2010)[18]
Fielding records
Most catches (match) 8 Naved Yasin (State Bank of Pakistan) vs. Bahawalpur Stags (18 October 2014)[19]
  – This was a world record partnership for the second wicket in first-class cricket.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Cricket associations representing regions, provinces, districts or cities.
  2. ^ Institutions, corporations or government departments.
  3. ^ "Total matches" includes matches scheduled but not played.
  4. ^ Central Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa shared the title after the final resulted in a tie.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Balachandran, Kanishkaa (5 October 2006). "A brief history... Quaid-E-Azam Trophy". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 19 February 2021.
  2. ^ Kazi, Abid Ali (24 December 2015). "History of First Class Cricket |".
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, the jewel in Pakistan domestic cricket's crown". Pakistan Cricket Board. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  4. ^ a b Rasool, Danyal (13 July 2017). "The QeA's annual tinkering: How the tournament has changed". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 20 February 2021.
  5. ^ "Quaid-e-Azam trophy 2019/20". Pakistan Cricket Board. Retrieved 7 September 2019.
  6. ^ "PCB announces detailed domestic schedule". The News International. Retrieved 7 September 2019.
  7. ^ "PCB announces playing conditions for 2019-20 season". The News International. Retrieved 7 September 2019.
  8. ^ https://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/records/135790.html
  9. ^ "First-Class Lowest Team Totals in Pakistan". Pakistan Cricket Board. Retrieved 6 March 2021.
  10. ^ "Domestic Cricketer of the Year Kamran Ghulam thrilled to be part of Pakistan squad". Cricket World. 18 January 2021. Retrieved 6 March 2021.
  11. ^ "First-Class Most Runs in a Match in Pakistan". Pakistan Cricket Board. Retrieved 6 March 2021.
  12. ^ https://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/records/94177.html
  13. ^ "First-Class Highest Individual Innings in Pakistan". Pakistan Cricket Board. Retrieved 6 March 2021.
  14. ^ https://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/records/283621.html
  15. ^ https://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/records/209288.html
  16. ^ "Saad Altaf sets Pakistan record with 16 for 141". ESPN Cricinfo. 3 November 2017. Retrieved 6 March 2021.
  17. ^ "First-Class Best Bowling in a Match in Pakistan". Pakistan Cricket Board. Retrieved 6 March 2021.
  18. ^ https://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/records/283372.html
  19. ^ https://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/records/283634.html

Other sourcesEdit