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Pitt Street is a major street in the central business district of Sydney in New South Wales, Australia. The street runs through the entire city centre from Circular Quay in the north to Waterloo, although today's street is in two disjointed sections after a substantial stretch of it was removed to make way for Sydney's Central Railway Station. Pitt Street is well known for the pedestrian only retail centre of Pitt Street Mall, a section of the street which runs from Market Street to King Street.

Pitt Street
Pitt st sydney.jpg
Looking north along Pitt Street, c. 2010
Pitt Street is located in Sydney
Pitt Street
Location of the northern terminus in the Sydney central business district
Former name(s)Pitt Row
NamesakeWilliam Pitt the Younger
OwnerCity of Sydney
LocationSydney central business district; Redfern and Waterloo
Coordinates33°51′41″S 151°12′33″E / 33.86139°S 151.20917°E / -33.86139; 151.20917Coordinates: 33°51′41″S 151°12′33″E / 33.86139°S 151.20917°E / -33.86139; 151.20917
North end
Major
junctions
Bridge Street; King Street; Pitt Street Mall; Park Street; Bathurst Street; Broadway; Cleveland Street
South end
Other
Status
  • Northbound one-way traffic in the CBD
  • Pedestrian mall in one CBD block
  • Two-way traffic near Central station
  • Two-way traffic in Redfern and Waterloo

The street is one way (northbound only) from Goulburn Street to Pitt Street Mall and (southbound only) from Circular Quay to Pitt Street Mall, while Pitt Street Mall is for pedestrians only. The northern section of the street, from Railway Square to Circular Quay, is dominated by retail and commercial office space, while the southern section, from Railway Square through Redfern to Waterloo, is predominantly residential with some light commercial and industrial use.

Pitt Street, along with Pitt Town and Pittwater,[1] is believed to have been named by Governor Arthur Phillip in honour of William Pitt the Younger, at the time, the Prime Minister of Great Britain.

HistoryEdit

Pitt Street was originally named Pitt Row,[2] and is one of the earliest named streets in Sydney. While it is usually assumed to be named after British Prime Minister William Pitt who was Prime Minister around the time of the establishment of Sydney, an alternative explanation is that it was initially so-named because it terminated close to the tanks or "pits" excavated in 1791–1792 in the Tank Stream, the original source of fresh water for the colony.[citation needed] In 1842, Pitt Street was continued south through to Waterloo with the subdivision of Redfern. In 1853, Pitt Street was extended north from Hunter Street to Circular Quay.[3]

Tram lineEdit

The Circular Quay, Central Station Colonnade via Pitt and Castlereagh Streets tram line was an extremely busy service for passengers transferring from suburban trains at Central, particularly prior to the opening of the city underground railway lines in 1926. Trams operated from Central station running northbound along Pitt Street to Circular Quay forming a loop (running southbound down Castlereagh Street) and back into Central station. These tracks were also used as the city route for some eastern and south-western routes during busy periods. The line closed on 28 September 1957, replaced by a bus service.[4] The line made use of the sandstone viaduct onto the colonnade at Central station, which has been reused by the Dulwich Hill Line as part of Sydney's light rail network since 1997.

Heritage-listed propertiesEdit

The following properties, located on or adjacent to Pitt Street, are listed on various national, state, and/or local government heritage registers:

GalleryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Reed, A. W. (1973). Place Names of Australia (1984 reprinted ed.). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Reed Books. p. 176. ISBN 0-589-50128-3.
  2. ^ "NOTES AND ANECDOTES ABOUT OLD PITT STREET: FROM ONE OfIr.C. H. BERTIE'S ARRESTING ARTICLES". National Library of Australia. The Freeman's Journal. 1 July 1920. Retrieved 6 December 2015.
  3. ^ City of Sydney, Street Names 22 May 2009
  4. ^ Keenan, D. Tramways of Sydney. Transit Press 1979
  5. ^ "Bulletin Place Restaurant". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00651. Retrieved 13 October 2018.
  6. ^ "Building". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00652. Retrieved 13 October 2018.
  7. ^ "Warehouse (former)". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00653. Retrieved 13 October 2018.
  8. ^ "Commonwealth Trading Bank Building, 108-120 Pitt St, Sydney, NSW, Australia (Place ID 1837)". Australian Heritage Database. Department of the Environment. Retrieved 20 April 2009.
  9. ^ "Former "Commonwealth Bank of Australia Building" including interiors". New South Wales Heritage Database. Office of Environment and Heritage. Retrieved 21 May 2018.
  10. ^ "Sugar House". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00417. Retrieved 13 October 2018.
  11. ^ "Pitt Street Uniting Church". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00022. Retrieved 13 October 2018.
  12. ^ "Former "Phoenix Chambers" and Soul Pattinson Store Including Interior". New South Wales Heritage Database. Office of Environment and Heritage. Retrieved 20 December 2018.
  13. ^ "Strand Arcade". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01864. Retrieved 14 October 2018.
  14. ^ "Sydney School of Arts". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00366. Retrieved 13 October 2018.
  15. ^ "Sydney Water Head Office (former) (1939 building)". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01645. Retrieved 14 October 2018.
  16. ^ "Sydney Club". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00583. Retrieved 13 October 2018.
  17. ^ "Wales House". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00586. Retrieved 13 October 2018.
  18. ^ "Gallery". Radisson Blu Sydney. Radisson Hotels. n.d. Retrieved 22 December 2018.
  19. ^ "Map of the city of Sydney, New South Wales". National Library of Australia. Retrieved 6 December 2015.

External linksEdit

Route map:

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