Pemberton, New Jersey

Pemberton is a borough in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,409.[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 199 (+16.4%) from the 1,210 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 157 (-11.5%) from the 1,367 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Pemberton, New Jersey
Borough of Pemberton
Center of the borough
Center of the borough
Pemberton Borough highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Pemberton Borough highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Pemberton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Pemberton, New Jersey
Pemberton is located in Burlington County, New Jersey
Pemberton
Pemberton
Location in Burlington County
Pemberton is located in New Jersey
Pemberton
Pemberton
Location in New Jersey
Pemberton is located in the United States
Pemberton
Pemberton
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°58′15″N 74°41′08″W / 39.970819°N 74.685498°W / 39.970819; -74.685498Coordinates: 39°58′15″N 74°41′08″W / 39.970819°N 74.685498°W / 39.970819; -74.685498[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyBurlington
IncorporatedDecember 15, 1826
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorHarold Griffin (R, term ends December 31, 2023)[3]
 • Administrator / Municipal clerkDonna J. Mull[4]
Area
 • Total0.602 sq mi (1.560 km2)
 • Land0.585 sq mi (1.515 km2)
 • Water0.017 sq mi (0.045 km2)  2.88%
Area rank541st of 566 in state
39th of 40 in county[1]
Elevation36 ft (11 m)
Population
 • Total1,409
 • Estimate 
(2019)[10]
1,324
 • Rank518th of 566 in state
37th of 40 in county[11]
 • Density2,408.7/sq mi (930.0/km2)
 • Density rank255th of 566 in state
13th of 40 in county[11]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)609 exchanges: 726, 894[14]
FIPS code3400557480[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID0885346[1][17]
Websitewww.pembertonborough.us

Pemberton was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on December 15, 1826, within portions of New Hanover Township and Northampton Township (now known as Mount Holly Township). Pemberton became an independent borough c. 1894.[19] The borough is named for James Pemberton, a property owner in the area.[20]

It is a dry community, where alcohol cannot be sold, as affirmed by a referendum in 1980.[21][22]

GeographyEdit

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.602 square miles (1.560 km2), including 0.585 square miles (1.515 km2) of land and 0.017 square miles (0.045 km2) of water (2.88%).[1][2]

Pemberton is an independent municipality within the boundaries of and completely surrounded by Pemberton Township,[23][24][25] making it one of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another.[26]

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
1870797
18807990.3%
18908344.4%
1900771−7.6%
19107973.4%
19208000.4%
1930783−2.1%
194090615.7%
19501,19431.8%
19601,2504.7%
19701,3447.5%
19801,198−10.9%
19901,36714.1%
20001,210−11.5%
20101,40916.4%
Est. 20191,324[10][27]−6.0%
Population sources:
1870-2000[28] 1870-1920[29]
1870[30][31] 1880-1890[32]
1890-1910[33] 1910-1930[34]
1930-1990[35] 2000[36][37] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010Edit

The 2010 United States Census counted 1,409 people, 581 households, and 403.795 families in the borough. The population density was 2,408.7 per square mile (930.0/km2). There were 642 housing units at an average density of 1,097.5 per square mile (423.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 74.38% (1,048) White, 15.26% (215) Black or African American, 0.21% (3) Native American, 3.26% (46) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 3.12% (44) from other races, and 3.76% (53) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.70% (179) of the population.[7]

The 581 households accounted 25.1% with children under the age of 18 living with them; 51.3% were married couples living together; 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. Of all households, 24.1% were made up of individuals, and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.79.[7]

In the borough, the population age was spread out with 19.0% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 25.2% from 25 to 44, 33.6% from 45 to 64, and 13.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.1 years. For every 100 females, the population had 90.7 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 90.5 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $65,568 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,899) and the median family income was $74,773 (+/- $17,679). Males had a median income of $44,750 (+/- $5,830) versus $46,406 (+/- $8,202) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,399 (+/- $6,078). About 2.8% of families and 6.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.5% of those under age 18 and 1.8% of those age 65 or over.[38]

Census 2000Edit

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 1,210 people, 470 households, and 316 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,034.5 people per square mile (791.8/km2). There were 513 housing units at an average density of 862.6 per square mile (335.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 78.43% White, 12.73% African American, 0.66% Native American, 2.40% Asian, 2.73% from other races, and 3.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.60% of the population.[36][37]

There were 470 households, out of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.7% were married couples living together, 15.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.6% were non-families. 26.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.06.[36][37]

In the borough the population was spread out, with 26.8% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 34.7% from 25 to 44, 20.1% from 45 to 64, and 8.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 103.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.6 males.[36][37]

The median income for a household in the borough was $44,063, and the median income for a family was $48,500. Males had a median income of $34,911 versus $25,474 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $18,909. About 7.2% of families and 7.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.4% of those under age 18 and 1.0% of those age 65 or over.[36][37]

GovernmentEdit

Local governmentEdit

Pemberton Borough is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 of 565 municipalities statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[39] The governing body is comprised of a Mayor and a Borough Council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council is comprised of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] The Borough form of government used by Pemberton is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[40][41]

As of 2020, the Mayor of Pemberton Borough is Republican Harold Griffin, whose term of office ends December 31, 2023. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Bonnie Haines (R, 2022), Robert Brock (R, 2022), Steve Fenster (R, 2021), Terry Jerome (R, 2020), Tim Quinlan (R, 2020) and Cliff Rutherford (R, 2021).[42][43][44][45][46]

The borough council appointed Harold Griffin in January 2014 to fill the vacant seat of William Kochersperger, who had resigned from his seat as mayor that month.[47]

Federal, state and county representationEdit

Pemberton Borough is located in the 3rd Congressional District[48] and is part of New Jersey's 8th state legislative district.[8][49][50]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Andy Kim (D, Bordentown).[51] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[52] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[53][54]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 8th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Dawn Marie Addiego (R, Evesham Township) and in the General Assembly by Joe Howarth (R, Evesham Township) and Ryan Peters (R, Hainesport Township).[55][56]

Burlington County is governed by a board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year; at an annual reorganization meeting, the board selects a director and deputy director from among its members.[57] As of 2018, Burlington County Board of Chosen Freeholders are Director Kate Gibbs (R, Lumberton Township, term as freeholder and as director ends December 31, 2018),[58] Deputy Director Linda Hughes (R, Evesham Township, term as freeholder and as deputy director ends 2018)[59] Tom Pullion (D, Edgewater Park, 2020),[60]Balvir Singh (D, Burlington Township, 2020),[61] and Latham Tiver (R, Southampton Township, 2019).[62][57][63][64] Burlington County's Constitutional Officers are County Clerk Tim Tyler (R, Fieldsboro, 2018),[65][66] Sheriff Jean E. Stanfield (R, Westampton, 2019)[67][68] and Surrogate Mary Ann O'Brien (R, Medford, 2021).[69][70][64]

PoliticsEdit

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 883 registered voters in Pemberton, of which 250 (28.3% vs. 33.3% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 266 (30.1% vs. 23.9%) were registered as Republicans and 367 (41.6% vs. 42.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[71] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 62.7% (vs. 61.7% in Burlington County) were registered to vote, including 77.4% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.3% countywide).[71][72]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 346 votes (52.9% vs. 58.1% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 294 votes (45.0% vs. 40.2%) and other candidates with 4 votes (0.6% vs. 1.0%), among the 654 ballots cast by the borough's 901 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.6% (vs. 74.5% in Burlington County).[73][74] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 383 votes (55.4% vs. 58.4% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 295 votes (42.7% vs. 39.9%) and other candidates with 9 votes (1.3% vs. 1.0%), among the 691 ballots cast by the borough's 882 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.3% (vs. 80.0% in Burlington County).[75] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 259 votes (56.9% vs. 46.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 193 votes (42.4% vs. 52.9%) and other candidates with 3 votes (0.7% vs. 0.8%), among the 455 ballots cast by the borough's 591 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.0% (vs. 78.8% in the whole county).[76]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 320 votes (69.1% vs. 61.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 129 votes (27.9% vs. 35.8%) and other candidates with 5 votes (1.1% vs. 1.2%), among the 463 ballots cast by the borough's 902 registered voters, yielding a 51.3% turnout (vs. 44.5% in the county).[77][78] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 229 votes (48.4% vs. 47.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 185 votes (39.1% vs. 44.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 38 votes (8.0% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 5 votes (1.1% vs. 1.2%), among the 473 ballots cast by the borough's 897 registered voters, yielding a 52.7% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[79]

EducationEdit

The Pemberton Borough School District is no longer operational.[80] Starting with the 2007–08 school year, all public school students from Pemberton Borough attend the schools of the Pemberton Township School District, with Pemberton Borough a part of the combined school district.[81][82] The district is one of 31 former Abbott districts statewide,[83] which are now referred to as "SDA Districts" based on the requirement for the state to cover all costs for school building and renovation projects in these districts under the supervision of the New Jersey Schools Development Authority.[84][85] The school district serves Pemberton Borough and Pemberton Township (including the communities of Browns Mills, Country Lake Estates, Pemberton Heights and Presidential Lakes Estates and the Pemberton Township portion of Fort Dix).[86][82] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of 11 schools, had an enrollment of 4,880 students and 434.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.2:1.[87]

Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[88]) are Pemberton Early Childhood Education Center[89] (with 465 students; in PreK), Samuel T. Busansky Elementary School[90] (333; 3-5), Isaiah Haines Elementary School[91] (291; K-2), Alexander Denbo Elementary School[92] (309; 3-5), Howard L. Emmons Elementary School[93] (288; K-2), Fort Dix Elementary School[94] (451; PreK-5), Harker-Wylie Elementary School[95] (284; K-2), Joseph S. Stackhouse Elementary School[96] (283; 3-5), Marcus Newcomb Middle School[97] (373; 6), Helen A. Fort Middle School[98] (664; 7-8) and Pemberton Township High School[99] (989; 9-12).[100][101]

Students from Pemberton, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[102]

TransportationEdit

 
CR 530 in Pemberton

Roads and highwaysEdit

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 8.81 miles (14.18 km) of roadways, of which 4.99 miles (8.03 km) were maintained by the municipality and 3.82 miles (6.15 km) by Burlington County.[103]

No Interstate, U.S. or state highways directly serve Pemberton. The most significant roadway passing through the borough is County Route 530.

Public transportationEdit

NJ Transit provides bus service in the township on the 317 route between Asbury Park and Philadelphia.[104][105] BurLink bus service is offered on the B1 route between Beverly and Pemberton).[106]

Notable peopleEdit

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Pemberton include:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
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  3. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020. As of date accessed, the source incorrectly lists David Patriarca, mayor of Pemberton Township.
  4. ^ Municipal Clerk, Borough of Pemberton. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 43.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Pemberton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Pemberton borough, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 30, 2012.
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  80. ^ Levinsky, David. "Pemberton Borough moving forward with school demolition", Burlington County Times, February 5, 2020. Accessed April 1, 2020. "The school opened in 1960 but has been boarded up and empty since 2007 when the kindergarten-through-sixth grade elementary school was closed in favor of sending all students from the borough to schools in neighboring Pemberton Township. Originally the borough paid the township a lump sum tuition based on the number of students who attended, but the non-operating school district was merged into the Pemberton Township School District in 2008."
  81. ^ Pemberton Township Board of Education District Policy 0110 - Identification, Pemberton Township School District. Accessed May 13, 2020. "Purpose: The Board of Education exists for the purpose of providing a thorough and efficient system of free public education in grades Pre-Kindergarten through twelve in the Pemberton Township School District. Composition: The Pemberton Township School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of Pemberton Township and Pemberton Borough."
  82. ^ a b District Overview, Pemberton Township School District. Accessed May 13, 2020. "Pemberton Township Schools serves approximately 5,000 students from Pemberton Township, Pemberton Borough and Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. With a dedicated early childhood education center serving 3 and 4 year-old pre-kindergarten students, seven elementary schools (grades kindergarten through 5th), two middle schools (one for grade 6, another for grades 7 and 8), and high school (grades 9-12), Pemberton Township Schools provide a quality, comprehensive education for all students."
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