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Miguel Ângelo Falcão de Oliveira (born 4 January 1995) is a Portuguese motorcycle racer, competing in the 2019 MotoGP World Championship for KTM Tech3, a satellite-team to KTM Factory Racing.[1] He finished as runner-up in the 2018 Moto2 World Championship.

Miguel Oliveira
Sepang Victory (2017).jpg
NationalityPortuguese
Born (1995-01-04) 4 January 1995 (age 24)
Almada, Portugal
Current teamRed Bull KTM Tech3[1]
Bike number88
Websiteoliveira88.com
Motorcycle racing career statistics
MotoGP World Championship
Active years2019
ManufacturersKTM
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
16 0 0 0 0 33
Moto2 World Championship
Active years20162018
ManufacturersKalex, KTM
Championships0
2018 championship position2nd (297 pts)
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
50 6 21 2 4 574
Moto3 World Championship
Active years20122015
ManufacturersSuter Honda, Mahindra, KTM
Championships0
2015 championship position2nd (254 pts)
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
68 6 13 2 6 628
125cc World Championship
Active years2011
ManufacturersAprilia
Championships0
2011 championship position14th (44 pts)
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
11 0 0 0 0 44

He gained extensive experience in Moto3, having competed for the Estrella Galicia 0,0 team in 2012, the Mahindra Racing team in 2013 and 2014 and finishing runner-up with the Red Bull KTM Ajo team in 2015.

Oliveira's father, a former motorcycle racer, always supported his son's love of racing and gave him his first quad-bike when he was four years old. He started racing in the national championship at nine years old, in the Portuguese MiniGP Championship in 2004, winning the Young Promise of the Year award in Portugal. His first successes came in 2005 when he won the Portuguese MiniGP championship and Metrakit World Festival in Spain. In 2006 he repeated his earlier success and in 2007 he won the Mediterranean PreGP 125 Trophy. In 2009 he was third in the Spanish championship, and in 2010 battled Maverick Viñales for the title, eventually finishing runner-up by just two points and progressed to become the first full-time Portuguese rider to reach the world championship. At the 2015 Italian Grand Prix, Oliveira achieved the first World Championship victory for a Portuguese rider.[2]

CareerEdit

125cc World ChampionshipEdit

2011Edit

2011 was Oliveira's first season in Motorcycling Grand Prix, in the 125cc Championship with Andalucía-Cajasol team. The bike was an Aprilia.[3] His best result was a 7th place at his home race at Estoril, having finished 10th on his début in Qatar. He achieved six top ten finishes in his first season, but did not compete in the final races after the team failed to secure financial support to end the season.

Moto3 World ChampionshipEdit

2012Edit

Oliveira moved to Moto3 machinery with Emilio Alzamora's Estrella Galicia 0,0 team for 2012, having helped to develop the new four-stroke Suter-Honda bike in the last rounds of the CEV 2011 season; winning two races in the process. In 2012 he led some races before crashing out and got his first podium, a third place, in Catalunya. He improved on that result with a second place in Australia, and ended the season in eighth place in the championship standings. As the team already had a contract with Álex Márquez to partner Álex Rins in 2013, Oliveira left the team. Despite offers from the Ajo Motorsport and Avintia Racing teams, Oliveira joined Mahindra Racing for 2013.[4]

2013Edit

He was once again developing a new bike with Suter, with a Mahindra-badged engine – based on 2012's Honda unit – and he got the first podium for the Indian team in Sepang, with a third-place finish. He also achieved a pole position, eight top-five finishes and three fastest laps with the new bike that was underpowered compared to the KTM machinery.

2014Edit

For 2014 he was joined by Arthur Sissis – who was later replaced by Andrea Migno due to poor results – and he obtained a podium in Assen, a third place. He finished the season as the best Mahindra rider in the championship, in tenth place. He will join the factory KTM Ajo team for 2015.

2015Edit

After joining the Red Bull Racing KTM Ajo Team, he became the first Portuguese rider to win a motorcycle Grand Prix with a victory at Mugello.[2] After taking a second victory in three races, at Assen,[5] Oliveira suffered a heavy crash during the first practice session of the following Grand Prix in Germany which forced him to withdraw from the race due to a broken and displaced metacarpal in the left hand. Returning from injury in Indianapolis his best result in the following three races was an eighth-place finish at Brno. With only 6 races remaining in the season, Oliveira trailed championship leader Danny Kent by 110 points. Oliveira finished second at Misano, before winning at Aragon; he also pulled 35 points back on Kent over the two races. Another 35 points were pulled back on Kent, as Oliveira continued his top-two streak with second in Japan,[6] and a victory at Phillip Island.[7] The victory also stopped Kent from clinching the title – Oliveira trailed Kent by 40 points with 50 points available, and was the only rider that could catch Kent in the standings. Oliveira won again in Malaysia, and with Kent finishing seventh, Oliveira kept the title race alive heading to the final round in Valencia – 24 points behind, with 25 points available.[8] Oliveira did all he could to try and claim the title; he won the race, but with Kent finishing ninth after a three-rider collision in the last corner, Oliveira fell six points short.[9]

Moto2 World ChampionshipEdit

2016Edit

On 13 September 2015, it was announced that Oliveira would be moving up to the Moto2 class for the 2016 season, with Leopard Racing.[10] He was joined in the team by his Moto3 championship rival Danny Kent.[11] Oliveira achieved three Top 10 results with a 9th place in Le Mans, 8th place in Catalunya and another 9th place in Brno before breaking his collarbone after a collision with Franco Morbidelli during practice for the Aragon Grand Prix. Morbidelli was later penalized for the crash with Oliveira missing out on the race. He returned for the Japanese Grand Prix and was initially declared fit by the medical team, but eventually did not start the race after assessing his condition during free practice. In consultation with the team it was later decided that Oliveira would also not start in the following races at Phillip Island and Sepang, where he was replaced by Alessandro Nocco.[12] Before the Aragon crash Oliveira had been comfortably leading the standings for Rookie of the Year throughout the season and he was behind by only one point after missing four races and returning for the final race of the year in Valencia.[13] He finished the race in a commendable 13th place, but fell short of clinching the trophy by a single point with eventual Rookie of the Year Xavi Vierge finishing just ahead of him in 12th place.

2017Edit

For the 2017 season Oliveira switches to the Red Bull Ajo Moto2 team with KTM making their debut in the Moto2 class.[14] On his return to the Ajo Team he partnered his former Moto3 teammate Brad Binder. On 22 October, he achieved his first win on Moto 2 and by doing so the first one ever for KTM on this class. Oliveira also won the following race at Malaysia and closed the 2017 Moto2 with a three in row, winning the final race in Valencia.

Still in 2017, Miguel Oliveira has initiated a pioneering pedagogic project in Portugal – the Oliveira Cup. This Motorcycle School Trophy, with his mentoring, is directed to young people from 10 to 14 years old, and aims to find his "successor". It enrolled 12 young riders for the first year and is now getting ready for the second season, in 2018.[15]

At the same time, Miguel Oliveira has a preponderant role preparing young talents channeled from Oliveira Cup to step into in the “National Velocity Championship”, under the Miguel Oliveira Fan Club Racing Team seal.

2018Edit

He remained with the Aki Ajo team for another season. During the Spanish GP weekend it was announced he'll move to Moto GP next season riding for KTM's new satellite team - Tech 3.[16]

Career highlightsEdit

  • 2004 – 4th place in Troféu Mini GP (Portuguese championship)
  • 2005 – 1st place in Metrakit World Festival (World champion), 1st place in Troféu Mini GP (Portuguese championship), 2nd place in Madrid Mini GP (Spanish championship)
  • 2006 – 1st place in RACE Madrid (Spanish Trophy), 1st place in Troféu Mini GP XL 70cc (Portuguese championship)
  • 2007 – 1st place in Troféu Open Racc Pre-125 (Spanish championship), 3rd place in Metrakit World Festival (World championship)
  • 2008 – 3rd place in Troféu Open Racc Pre-125 (Spanish championship), 8th place in Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup at Estoril, 1st place in Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup at Donington and Assen, 1st place in 250cc 4T at Jerez
  • 2009 – 3rd place in CEV final standings (Spanish championship), 5th place European 125GP
  • 2010 – 2nd place (runner-up) in the European 125GP championship, 2nd place (runner-up) in CEV (Spanish championship)
  • 2011 – 14th in 125cc World Championship, 1st place in CEV Moto3 (Spanish Championship) at Valencia and Jerez
  • 2012 – 8th in Moto3 World Championship (2 podiums)
  • 2013 – 6th in Moto3 World Championship (1 podium)
  • 2014 – 10th in Moto3 World Championship (1 podium)
  • 2015 – 2nd in Moto3 World Championship (9 podiums, 6 wins)
  • 2016 – 20th in Moto2 World Championship (only 13 of 18 races after injury)
  • 2017 – 3rd in Moto2 World Championship (9 podiums, 3 wins)
  • 2018 – 2nd in Moto2 World Championship (12 podiums, 3 wins)

Career statisticsEdit

By seasonEdit

Season Class Motorcycle Team Number Race Win Pod Pole FLap Pts Plcd WCh
2011 125cc Aprilia Andalucia Banca Civica 44 11 0 0 0 0 44 14th
2012 Moto3 Suter Honda Estrella Galicia 0,0 44 17 0 2 0 0 114 8th
2013 Moto3 Mahindra Mahindra Racing 44 17 0 1 1 3 150 6th
2014 Moto3 Mahindra Mahindra Racing 44 17 0 1 0 0 110 10th
2015 Moto3 KTM Red Bull KTM Ajo 44 17 6 9 1 3 254 2nd
2016 Moto2 Kalex Leopard Racing 44 14 0 0 0 0 36 21st
2017 Moto2 KTM Red Bull KTM Ajo 44 18 3 9 2 3 241 3rd
2018 Moto2 KTM Red Bull KTM Ajo 44 18 3 12 0 1 297 2nd
2019 MotoGP KTM Red Bull KTM Tech 3 88 16 0 0 0 0 33* 16th*
Total 145 12 34 4 10 1279 0

 

By classEdit

Class Seasons 1st GP 1st Pod 1st Win Race Win Podiums Pole FLap Pts WChmp
125cc 2011 2011 Qatar 11 0 0 0 0 44 0
Moto3 2012–2015 2012 Qatar 2012 Catalunya 2015 Italy 68 6 13 2 6 628 0
Moto2 2016–2018 2016 Qatar 2017 Argentina 2017 Australia 50 6 21 2 4 574 0
MotoGP 2019–present 2019 Qatar 16 0 0 0 0 33 0
Total 2011–Present 145 12 34 4 10 1279 0

 

Races by yearEdit

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position, races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Yr Class Bike 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Pos Pts
2011 125cc Aprilia QAT
10
SPA
Ret
POR
7
FRA
9
CAT
Ret
GBR NED ITA
8
GER
Ret
CZE
23
IND
8
RSM
10
ARA
Ret
JPN AUS MAL VAL 14th 44
2012 Moto3 Suter Honda QAT
5
SPA
Ret
POR
Ret
FRA
Ret
CAT
3
GBR
10
NED
10
GER
19
ITA
Ret
IND
4
CZE
9
RSM
9
ARA
8
JPN
7
MAL
5
AUS
2
VAL
Ret
8th 114
2013 Moto3 Mahindra QAT
7
AME
5
SPA
16
FRA
Ret
ITA
4
CAT
6
NED
4
GER
4
IND
8
CZE
9
GBR
5
RSM
7
ARA
5
MAL
3
AUS
26
JPN
4
VAL
10
6th 150
2014 Moto3 Mahindra QAT
4
AME
15
ARG
DNS
SPA
14
FRA
12
ITA
4
CAT
12
NED
3
GER
Ret
IND
7
CZE
7
GBR
4
RSM
22
ARA
7
JPN
Ret
AUS
7
MAL
Ret
VAL
8
10th 110
2015 Moto3 KTM QAT
16
AME
Ret
ARG
4
SPA
2
FRA
8
ITA
1
CAT
5
NED
1
GER
DNS
IND
15
CZE
8
GBR
13
RSM
2
ARA
1
JPN
2
AUS
1
MAL
1
VAL
1
2nd 254
2016 Moto2 Kalex QAT
11
ARG
21
AME
Ret
SPA
Ret
FRA
9
ITA
13
CAT
8
NED
15
GER
Ret
AUT
14
CZE
9
GBR
Ret
RSM
17
ARA
DNS
JPN
DNS
AUS MAL VAL
13
21st 36
2017 Moto2 KTM QAT
4
ARG
2
AME
6
SPA
3
FRA
17
ITA
5
CAT
3
NED
5
GER
2
CZE
3
AUT
Ret
GBR
8
RSM
Ret
ARA
3
JPN
7
AUS
1
MAL
1
VAL
1
3rd 241
2018 Moto2 KTM QAT
5
ARG
3
AME
3
SPA
2
FRA
6
ITA
1
CAT
2
NED
6
GER
4
CZE
1
AUT
2
GBR
C
RSM
2
ARA
7
THA
3
JPN
3
AUS
11
MAL
2
VAL
1
2nd 297
2019 MotoGP KTM QAT
17
ARG
11
AME
14
SPA
18
FRA
15
ITA
16
CAT
12
NED
13
GER
18
CZE
13
AUT
8
GBR
Ret
RSM
16
ARA
13
THA
16
JPN
12
AUS
MAL
VAL
16th* 33*

* Season still in progress.

 

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b KTM-backed Moto2 frontrunner Oliveira gets 2019 Tech3 MotoGP ride Autosport.com, Retrieved 3 December 2018
  2. ^ a b Lewis, Lisa (31 May 2015). "Historic victory for Oliveira". Crash.net. Crash Media Group. Retrieved 31 May 2015.
  3. ^ Ribeiro, Paulo (10 November 2010). "Miguel Oliveira vai correr no Mundial de 125 cc" [Miguel Oliveira will run in the 125 cc World Championship]. A Bola (in Portuguese). Sociedade Vicra Desportiva. Archived from the original on 12 November 2010. Retrieved 14 September 2014.
  4. ^ "Mahindra Racing riders for 2013, Efrén Vázquez & Miguel Oliveira, say Namaste India!". MotoGP.com. Dorna Sports. 29 January 2013. Retrieved 7 February 2013.
  5. ^ "Oliveira takes incredible Moto3 victory". MotoGP.com. Dorna Sports. 27 June 2015. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  6. ^ Lewis, Lisa (11 October 2015). "Antonelli dominates for wet Motegi win". Crash.net. Crash Media Group. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  7. ^ "Oliveira victory in Moto3 keeps title hopes alive". MotoGP.com. Dorna Sports. 18 October 2015. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  8. ^ "Oliveira wins to take title fight to Valencia". MotoGP.com. Dorna Sports. 25 October 2015. Retrieved 25 October 2015.
  9. ^ "Gran Premio Motul de la Comunitat Valenciana – Moto3 – 2015 World Championship Classification" (PDF). MotoGP.com. Dorna Sports. 8 November 2015. Retrieved 8 November 2015.
  10. ^ "Miguel Oliveira to Moto2 with Leopard Racing". MotoGP.com. Dorna Sports. 13 September 2015. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  11. ^ "Kent moves to Moto2 with Leopard Racing". MotoGP.com. Dorna Sports. 27 September 2015. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  12. ^ "Nocco replaces Oliveira in Australia and in Malaysia – Leopard Natural". leopardnatural.com. Retrieved 13 January 2017.
  13. ^ "Oliveira back on track to graduate at leading rookie – Leopard Natural". leopardnatural.com. Retrieved 13 January 2017.
  14. ^ Sports, Dorna. "Red Bull KTM Ajo take on Moto2™ in 2017". www.motogp.com. Retrieved 13 January 2017.
  15. ^ "Miguel Oliveira #44 - Official Website". www.migueloliveira44.com. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  16. ^ "Oliveira heading for MotoGP™ in 2019, with KTM Tech 3". MotoGP.com. Dorna Sports. 5 May 2018. Retrieved 7 May 2018.

External linksEdit