Lom is a municipality in Innlandet county, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Gudbrandsdal. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Fossbergom. Another village area in Lom is Elvesæter.

Lom kommune
View of the local Lom Stave Church
View of the local Lom Stave Church
Coat of arms of Lom kommune
Official logo of Lom kommune
Lom within Innlandet
Lom within Innlandet
Coordinates: 61°48′39″N 8°38′21″E / 61.81083°N 8.63917°E / 61.81083; 8.63917Coordinates: 61°48′39″N 8°38′21″E / 61.81083°N 8.63917°E / 61.81083; 8.63917
CountryNorway
CountyInnlandet
DistrictGudbrandsdalen
Established1 Jan 1838
Administrative centreFossbergom
Government
 • Mayor (2011)Bjarne Eiolf Holø (Sp)
Area
 • Total1,968.54 km2 (760.06 sq mi)
 • Land1,887.24 km2 (728.67 sq mi)
 • Water81.30 km2 (31.39 sq mi)  4.1%
 • Rank#38 in Norway
Population
 (2021)
 • Total2,204
 • Rank#267 in Norway
 • Density1.2/km2 (3/sq mi)
 • Change (10 years)
Decrease −8.2%
DemonymLomvær[1]
Official language
 • Norwegian formNynorsk
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeNO-3434
WebsiteOfficial website

The 1,969-square-kilometre (760 sq mi) municipality is the 38th largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Lom is the 267th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 2,021. The municipality's population density is 1.2 inhabitants per square kilometre (3.1/sq mi) and its population has decreased by 8.2% over the previous 10-year period.[3][4]

Lom is famous for its extensive history, for Lom Stave Church, one of the few remaining stave churches in Norway. Also for being located in the midst of the highest mountains in Northern Europe.

General informationEdit

The prestegjeld (parish) of Lom was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt law). On 1 January 1866, the western district of Lom (population: 2,691) was separated and established as the new municipality of Skiaker. Afterwards, the remaining part of Lom had 3,299 residents. The boundaries of Lom have not changed since that time.[5]

NameEdit

The municipality was named Lom after the old Lom farm (Old Norse: Lóm) where the Lom Stave Church is located. The Old Norse form of the name was Lóar (nominative case) and Lóm (dative case). The name is the plural form of which means "meadow".[6]

Coat of armsEdit

The coat of arms was granted on 6 February 1987. The arms show three silver-colored skjeltrekor (spades) on a blue background. These spades were historically used to scoop water from the irrigation channels typical for the area. The area is one of the driest in Norway, but the soil is good for agriculture. It thus needs irrigation. In the 17th century, a system was developed in which melting water from the mountains was transported to the area using wooden channels or aqueducts. The water was further divided using irrigation channels.[7]

ChurchesEdit

The Church of Norway has three parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Lom. It is part of the Nord-Gudbrandsdal prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Hamar.

Churches in Lom
Parish (sokn) Church name Location of the church Year built
Bøverdalen Bøverdal Church Galdesanden (Bøverdalen) 1864
Garmo Garmo Church Garmo 1879
Lom Lom Stave Church Fossbergom c. 1185

HistoryEdit

Number of minorities (1st and 2nd generation) in Lom by country of origin in 2017[8]
Ancestry Number
  Somalia 31
  Germany 18
  Eritrea 17

An ancient trade route passed up from Sunnmøre through Lom and Skjåk and down the Gudbrandsdalen valley into Eastern Norway. The trade consisted of fish and salt heading inland, and grain heading to the coast.

The Saga of Olaf Haraldson relates that St. Olaf commented as he first looked down on Lom, "What a pity to have to lay waste to such a beautiful valley." In the face of such a clear motivation, the residents of the valley converted (it has since been a recurring discussion whether he looked to Lom or the neighbouring municipality Skjåk, at the time a part of Lom.) St. Olafs-stuggu, a building where St. Olaf is reported to have spent a night in 1021, can still be found here. The building is part of the Presthaugen District Museum.

Lom Stave Church, which is located in Fossbergom, is believed to have been built in 1158, making 2008 the 850th anniversary. It was enlarged in 1634, with further addition of two naves in 1667. It is believed that the church was originally surrounded by a circumambulatory passage, like many other Norwegian stave churches, but that this passage was removed when the two side wings were added. A few Runic inscriptions can be still be seen in the church. The church also contains numerous paintings from the 17th and 18th centuries with religious motifs. Many of the paintings were made by local artist Eggert Munch, a distant relation of the famous Edvard Munch. The church also contains numerous examples of local woodcarving, as seen in the elaborate acanthus scrolls adorning the pulpit. Carved dragon figures on the roof are old symbols of protection against evil. It is still in use as the local church.

The Garmo Stave Church, which was built around 1150, has been relocated from Lom municipality and is now at Maihaugen in Lillehammer. It was replaced with a new Garmo Church.

During the 1940 Norwegian Campaign German prisoners of war were kept by the Norwegian Army at Lom prisoner of war camp. Lom was bombed twice by the German Luftwaffe in April 1940.[9]

GovernmentEdit

All municipalities in Norway, including Lom, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elects a mayor.[10] The municipality falls under the Vestre Innlandet District Court and the Eidsivating Court of Appeal.

Municipal councilEdit

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Lom is made up of 17 representatives that are elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the council is as follows:

Lom Kommunestyre 2020–2023 [11]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)4
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Lom List (Lomslista)4
 Local List (Bygdalista)2
Total number of members:17
Lom Kommunestyre 2016–2019 [12][13]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)4
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)8
 Lom List (Lomslista)2
 Local List (Bygdalista)3
Total number of members:17
Lom Kommunestyre 2012–2015 [14]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)5
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Lom List (Lomslista)3
 Local List in Lom (Bygdalista i Lom)3
Total number of members:17
Lom Kommunestyre 2008–2011 [13]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)11
 Local list in Lom (Bygdelista i Lom)3
Total number of members:17
Lom Kommunestyre 2004–2007 [13]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)5
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)9
 Local list in Lom (Bygdelista i Lom)3
Total number of members:17
Lom Kommunestyre 2000–2003 [13]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)8
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Local list for cross-party cooperation
(Bygdalista for tverrpolitisk samarbeid)
7
Total number of members:21
Lom Kommunestyre 1996–1999 [15]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)11
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)8
 Local list for cross-party cooperation
(Bygdalista for tverrpolitisk samarbeid)
2
Total number of members:21
Lom Kommunestyre 1992–1995 [16]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)10
 Conservative Party (Høgre)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Local list for cross-party cooperation
(Bygdalista for tverrpolitisk samarbeid)
3
Total number of members:21
Lom Kommunestyre 1988–1991 [17]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)11
 Conservative Party (Høgre)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Local list for cross-party cooperation
(Bygdalista for tverrpolitisk samarbeid)
4
Total number of members:21
Lom Kommunestyre 1984–1987 [18]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)11
 Conservative Party (Høgre)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Local list for cross-party cooperation
(Bygdalista for tverrpolitisk samarbeid)
2
Total number of members:21
Lom Kommunestyre 1980–1983 [19]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)9
 Conservative Party (Høgre)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Local list for cross-party cooperation
(Bygdalista for tverrpolitisk samarbeid)
3
Total number of members:21
Lom Kommunestyre 1976–1979 [20]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)10
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Local list for cross-party cooperation
(Bygdalista for tverrpolitisk samarbeid)
4
Total number of members:21
Lom Kommunestyre 1972–1975 [21]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)11
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgarlege Felleslister)10
Total number of members:21
Lom Kommunestyre 1968–1971 [22]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)11
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgarlege Felleslister)10
Total number of members:21
Lom Kommunestyre 1964–1967 [23]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)11
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgarlege Felleslister)3
Total number of members:21
Lom Heradsstyre 1960–1963 [24]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)13
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgarlege Felleslister)3
Total number of members:21
Lom Heradsstyre 1956–1959 [25]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)12
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgarlege Felleslister)9
Total number of members:21
Lom Heradsstyre 1952–1955 [26]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)12
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgarlege Felleslister)12
Total number of members:24
Lom Heradsstyre 1948–1951 [27]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)13
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)3
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgarlege Felleslister)8
Total number of members:24
Lom Heradsstyre 1945–1947 [28]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)12
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)12
Total number of members:24
Lom Heradsstyre 1938–1941* [29]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)14
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)9
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)1
Total number of members:24
Note: Due to the German occupation of Norway during World War II, no elections were held for new municipal councils until after the war ended in 1945.

MayorsEdit

The mayors of Lom (incomplete list):

  • 1996-1999: Jarmund Øyen (Ap)
  • 1999-2003: Magnar Mundhjeld (LL)
  • 2003-2011: Simen Bjørgen (Sp)
  • 2011-present: Bjarne Eiolf Holø (Sp)

GeographyEdit

 
River Bøvra in Lom

Lom is the "gateway" to the Jotunheimen Mountains and to Jotunheim National Park. The municipality contains the two highest peaks in Norway, Galdhøpiggen at 2,469 metres (8,100 ft) and Glittertind at 2,464 metres (8,084 ft), which lie within the park.

Lom is bordered on the northwest by the municipality of Skjåk, in the north by Lesja, in the east and southeast by Vågå, in the south by Vang all in Innlandet county. In the southwest, it is bordered by Luster municipality in Vestland county. The main village of Fossbergom is situated in the Ottadalen valley at an elevation of 382 metres (1,253 ft) above sea level.

ClimateEdit

The climate is very continental by Norwegian standards. Average annual precipitation (in Fossbergom) is 321 millimetres (12.6 in), and monthly 24-hr averages range from −10 °C (14 °F) in January to 14 °C (57 °F) in July.[30] Summers are often sunny with daytime temperatures typically ranging from 14 °C (57 °F) to 25 °C (77 °F). The large mountain areas in Lom are much colder and have more precipitation; snowy weather is possible even in summer at altitudes above 2,000 metres (6,600 ft). Agriculture has for centuries used irrigation.

EconomyEdit

Agriculture has long been important in Lom. The natural environment and history of this mountainous region also make Lom a tourist destination.[citation needed]

Notable residentsEdit

 
Knut Hamsun, 1939

AttractionsEdit

 
Lom stave church from a different viewpoint.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. ^ "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  3. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (2021). "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian).
  4. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (2021). "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian).
  5. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  6. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1900). Norske gaardnavne: Kristians amt (in Norwegian) (4 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 47.
  7. ^ "Civic heraldry of Norway - Norske Kommunevåpen". Heraldry of the World. Retrieved 19 May 2022.
  8. ^ "Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents, by immigration category, country background and percentages of the population". ssb.no. Archived from the original on 2 July 2015. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  9. ^ Mølmen, Øystein (1996). Krigen 1940–45 (in Norwegian). Lesjaskog: Ø. Mølmen. p. 325. ISBN 82-993958-0-1.
  10. ^ Hansen, Tore, ed. (12 May 2016). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 30 January 2022.
  11. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2019 - Innlandet". Valg Direktoratet. Retrieved 19 May 2022.
  12. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2015 - Innlandet". Valg Direktoratet.
  13. ^ a b c d "Table: 04813: Members of the local councils, by party/electoral list at the Municipal Council election (M)" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  14. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2011 - Innlandet". Valg Direktoratet.
  15. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1995" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1996. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  16. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1991" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1993. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  17. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1987" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1988. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  18. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1983" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1984. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  19. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1979" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1979. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  20. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1975" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1977. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  21. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1972" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1973. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  22. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1967" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1967. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  23. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1963" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1964. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  24. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  25. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  26. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  27. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  28. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  29. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  30. ^ "Met.no". Archived from the original on 4 February 2005.

External linksEdit