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Jacksonville Jaguars

The Jacksonville Jaguars are a professional football franchise based in Jacksonville, Florida. The Jaguars compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the American Football Conference (AFC) South division. The team plays its home games at TIAA Bank Field.

Jacksonville Jaguars
Current season
Established November 30, 1993; 26 years ago (1993-11-30)[1]
First season: 1995
Play in and headquartered at TIAA Bank Field
Jacksonville, Florida
Jacksonville Jaguars logo
Jacksonville Jaguars wordmark
LogoWordmark
League/conference affiliations

National Football League (1995–present)

Current uniform
Jacksonville Jaguars uniforms 2018.png
Team colorsBlack, teal, gold[2][3]
              
MascotJaxson de Ville
Personnel
Owner(s)Shahid Khan
PresidentMark Lamping
General managerDavid Caldwell
Head coachDoug Marrone
Team history
  • Jacksonville Jaguars (1995–present)
Team nicknames
  • Jags
Championships
League championships (0)
Conference championships (0)
Division championships (3)
Playoff appearances (7)
Home fields

The Jaguars and the Carolina Panthers joined the NFL as expansion teams for the 1995 season. Since their inception, the Jaguars have won division championships in 1998 and 1999 (as members of the now-defunct AFC Central) and 2017 (as members of the AFC South) and have qualified for the playoffs seven times, most recently in 2017 after a ten-season playoff drought.[4]

From their inception until 2011, the Jacksonville Jaguars' majority owner was Wayne Weaver. The team was then purchased by Pakistani-born businessman Shahid Khan for an estimated $770 million.[5][6] In 2015, Forbes estimated the team value at $1.48 billion.[7]

Franchise historyEdit

Team colors, logos, and mascotEdit

LogosEdit

The day after the NFL awarded the expansion team to Jacksonville, a triumphant Wayne Weaver held up the Jaguars' proposed silver helmet and teal jersey at the NFL owners' meeting in Chicago. The team's colors were to be teal, gold, and silver with black accents. However, this jersey and helmet design, with a gold leaping jaguar, created controversy. Ford Motor Company, then-parent of the automaker Jaguar, believed that the Jaguars' logo bore too much resemblance to the automaker's logo. Though no lawsuit was brought to trial, lawyers from the team and the automaker negotiated an ultimately amicable agreement whereby Jaguar would be named the official car of the Jaguars, and the Jaguars would redesign their uniforms.

The new logo was a snarling jaguar head with a teal tongue, which Weaver said was his wife's touch. He also claimed that the teal tongue came from "feeding Panthers to our Jaguars" — an obvious jab at their expansion brethren. During the Jaguars' first ever preseason game teal-colored candies were handed out to all the fans who attended, turning their tongues a teal color just like on the logo. Additionally, raspberry lollipops were handed out by the "Candy Man" in section 142 to also turn the home fans' tongues teal.

In 2009, Weaver announced that he wanted to 'clean up' the team's image. This meant the elimination of the full-body crawling Jaguar logo, the clawing Jaguar, and the two previous wordmarks which bent the text around these logos.

In February 2013, Jaguars owner Shahid Khan, who had acquired the team in late 2011, introduced a new brand identity for the team that included a new logo, wordmark, and secondary logo. The new Jaguar head logo was intended to be "fiercer" and more realistic.[8] The secondary logo incorporated the new Jaguar head logo along with the first official usage of the team's popular nickname "Jags". The two images were encased in a shield-style shape, designed to be a tribute to Jacksonville's military community.[2]

Beginning in 2013, the Jaguars began to feature gold more prominently than in the past. In fact, from 2009–12 gold had only been used in the team logo and as a minor accent color.

UniformsEdit

For most of their history, the Jaguars have done what many other NFL teams located in subtropical climates traditionally practice: wear their white jerseys at home during the first half of the season — forcing opponents to wear their dark ones under the sweltering autumns in Jacksonville. The only exceptions were in 2004 and 2008–10, when the Jaguars chose to wear teal for all home games. In the preseason, the Jaguars typically wear teal at home since these games are played at night when there is very little advantage with the heat.

1995–2001Edit

Following the logo change, the redesigned uniforms featured an all-black helmet, white pants with teal, black, and gold stripes, and numbers with gold inner trim and black outer trim. The home jersey was teal with white numbers and the away jersey was white with teal numbers. Both jerseys had a black collar and no sleeve stripes.

A prowling jaguar on each sleeve replaced the leaping jaguar going across both shoulders in the original design. The Jaguars in 1995 were the first NFL team to have 2-tone borders on their numbers and lettering, and the first NFL team to show a complex logo (the crawling Jaguar) on the sleeve.

Minor modifications were introduced to the Jaguars uniform during this time, most notably the font of the jersey numbers, replacing the original block numbers with a unique font. Two stripes were also added to the end of the sleeves below the prowling jaguar.

2002–2008Edit

 
Jaguars away in Pittsburgh in 2005.

During this period, the Jaguars made minor changes to their uniform, each time adding more black to the look.

The team introduced a black alternate jersey in 2002. During that same year, the team also introduced alternate black pants, worn with either the white or the teal jersey. After the black pants were introduced, the white pants would only be seen for the first few games of the year, presumably due to the heat. The black pants originally included two teal stripes down each side. The fan reaction to the extra black in the alternate jersey and alternate pants was positive, so in 2004 the Jaguars went through a formal uniform change, which teams are only allowed to do once every five years. These changes were mostly to the away look. Before 2004, the white away jerseys had teal numbers with black and gold trim, but after, the white jerseys had black numbers with teal and gold trim. The black pants were also changed. The teal stripes were replaced with the Jaguar logo on each hip. Teal almost disappeared from the away uniform.

The stripes on the white pants were altered in 2008 so that the center, thickest stripe was black, and its accents were teal. In the 2008 year, the gold in the uniforms noticeably shifted from a bright yellow metallic appearance to more beige.

2009–2011Edit

 
Jaguars home game in 2011.

The Jaguars unveiled new uniforms for the 2009 season. Team owner Wayne Weaver reportedly wanted to "clean up" the look, feeling that the team had too many uniform styles. The new uniforms were introduced in a press conference on April 22.[9]

At this press conference, Weaver elaborated that different people had taken different liberties with the Jaguars' image over the years, singling out the 'All Black' look which the team wore for every prime-time home game from 2003 to 2007 as a point of regret. He also said that the team would wear their teal jerseys at home even on hot days, saying that the practice of choosing to wear white on hot days had also diluted the team's image. The new uniform reflected a simpler look overall. The collar and sleeve ends are the same color as the rest of the jersey. The crawling jaguar was removed. The numbers on the jerseys were changed to a simpler, block font with a thicker, single color border. After all of these subtractions, two features were added. The first was a "JAGUARS" wordmark underneath the NFL insignia on the chest. The second was two thin 'stripes' of off-color fabric which were added to each midseam of the jersey, curling up to the neckline on the front and below the number on the back. The stripe on the home jersey is a white line next to a black line, matching the color of the numbers, and the stripe on the away jersey is a black line next to a teal line, again matching the numbers. The pants have similar stripes, both for the home and away uniform. The away uniforms were still black pants and numbers on a white jersey, but they now used teal as the only accent color as opposed to using gold in previous years. The Jaguars' identity, in terms of colors, beginning in 2009 is exclusively teal and black, with gold only being used in the logo. The final change made to the Jaguars' uniforms in 2009 was to the helmet. The new helmet and facemask were black just like the old ones, but when light hit the new ones a certain way, both the helmet and face mask sparkled with a shiny teal appearance. These were the first helmets in professional football which changed color with different angles of light. The logo and number decals also incorporated this effect.[10]

2012Edit

Prior to the 2012 season, new Jaguars owner Shahid Khan announced that the team would once again use a black jersey, something they had not done since 2008. In September of that year, the team announced that it would use the black jersey and black pants as their primary home uniform. The teal jersey was resurrected as an alternate.[11]

2013–2017Edit

 
The Jacksonville Jaguars uniforms, worn by Jaguars players from 20132017.

On April 23, 2013, the Jaguars unveiled new uniforms designed by Nike. The primary home jersey is black with white numerals outlined in teal and gold. The road jersey is white with teal numerals outlined in black and gold, marking the first time since 2003 that the team has used teal numbers on their road jersey. The alternate jersey is teal with black numerals outlined in white and gold. The team had never before used black numbers on their teal jersey. All three jerseys feature a contrasting stripe that bends around the neck, and semi-glossy patches on the shoulders meant to resemble claw marks. The team added their new shield logo onto a patch just above the player's heart, meant to pay tribute to Jacksonville's military heritage.[12]

The helmet, first of its kind in the NFL, featured a glossy gold finish in the back that fades to matte black in the front, via a color gradient.[13]

The new uniform set includes black and white pants with the Jaguars logo on the hip and a tri-color pattern down the player's leg.

In November 2015, as one of eight teams participating in Nike's "Color Rush" initiative for four games of Thursday Night Football during the 2015 season, Jacksonville introduced an all-gold second alternative uniform. The set features a gold jersey with black sleeves and black trim, as well as all gold pants. The white front and back numbers are lined in the teal accent color and bordered by black. The TV numbers on the shoulders are white with black bordering. The set also features gold undershirts and socks.[14]

2018–presentEdit

On April 19, 2018, the Jaguars again revealed re-designed uniforms. The new design returns to an all-black gloss helmet and removes many of the complicated details from the previous set. For the first time, there will be no borders at all on any of the jersey numbers. There are no stripes or team logo on the pants; only an NFL logo and a Nike logo, which is the first and only of its kind in the NFL. Like the 2009 uniform set, the only gold in the uniform set belongs to the Jaguar logo itself, and the block number font is not distinct from that used by other teams. The sleeve trim and collar trim are both a different color than the rest of the jersey, that and the solitary Jaguar logo are the only distinct markings on the jersey. For the first time, the sock has a teal stripe between the black and white. The black jersey is the primary, as it has been since 2012, and the teal is the alternate.[15][16]

MascotEdit

 
Jaxson de Ville with American Idol season 6 finalist Phil Stacey.

Since his introduction in 1996, Jaxson de Ville has served as the Jaguars' mascot. Jaxson entertains the crowd before and during games with his antics. The mascot has established a reputation for making dramatic entrances including bungee jumping off the stadium lights, sliding down a rope from the scoreboard, and parachuting into the stadium.

Jaxson's antics got him into trouble in 1998 and stemmed the changing of the NFL's mascot rules, and also caused him to calm down.[17] However, Jaxson was still seen, by some, as a mascot that gets in the way during the game. After the October 22, 2007 game against Indianapolis, Colts President Bill Polian complained to the NFL, and Jaxson was reprimanded again.[18][19]

Jaxson's first appearance was on August 18, 1996[20] and was played by Curtis Dvorak from his inception until his retirement in June 2015.[21]

Jacksonville RoarEdit

The Jacksonville Roar is the professional cheerleading squad of the Jaguars. The group was established in 1995, the team's inaugural year, and regularly performs choreographed routines during the team's home contests.[22]

In addition to performing at games and pep rallies, members function as goodwill ambassadors of the team, participating in corporate, community, and charitable events in the Jacksonville metropolitan area[23] where they sign autographs and pose for pictures. They also join NFL tours to entertain American servicemen and women around the world.[23][24]

StadiumEdit

TIAA Bank Field, home of the Jacksonville Jaguars and the world's largest scoreboards.

TIAA Bank Field (formerly known as Jacksonville Municipal Stadium, Alltel Stadium, and EverBank Field) is located on the north bank of the St. Johns River, and has been the home of the Jaguars since the team's first season in 1995. The stadium has a capacity of 69,132, with additional seating added during Florida–Georgia Game and the Gator Bowl.[25]

The stadium served as the site of Super Bowl XXXIX in addition to four Jaguar playoff games including the 1999 AFC Championship Game. It also hosted the ACC Championship Game from 2005–07 and the River City Showdown in 2007 and 2008.

From 1995–97 and again from 2006–09, the stadium was named Jacksonville Municipal Stadium. From 1997–2006, the stadium was referred to as Alltel Stadium.[26] The naming rights were purchased by EverBank prior to the 2010 season.[27] Prior to the 2018 season the Jaguars announced the stadium would be renamed TIAA Bank Field.[28]

The stadium got a substantial upgrade in 2014 with the addition of new scoreboards, pools, cabana seating and premium seating that includes 180 field-level seats. The scoreboards are 60 feet high and 362 feet long. The new scoreboards at TIAA Bank Field are now the world's largest video boards. Two 25 feet by 12 feet pools were installed in the north and south end zones along with the cabana seating. The stadium upgrades were $63 million that owner Shahid Khan helped finance $20 million of the total cost.[29]

RivalsEdit

The Jacksonville Jaguars have three primary rivals: their divisional rivals (Tennessee Titans, Indianapolis Colts, and Houston Texans).[30] They have geographic rivalries with the Miami Dolphins and Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The Jaguars also have a rivalry with their 1995 expansion brethren, the Carolina Panthers. They also have rivalries with other teams that arose from the AFC Central days, most notably with the Pittsburgh Steelers, who they competed against and defeated in 2017 regular season and the 2017 playoffs.[31][32] Arguably, a rivalry has also emerged with the Buffalo Bills as of late.[33]

Statistics and recordsEdit

Season-by-season resultsEdit

This is a partial list of the Jaguars' last five completed seasons. For the full season-by-season franchise results, see List of Jacksonville Jaguars seasons.

Note: The Finish, Wins, Losses, and Ties columns list regular season results and exclude any postseason play.

Super Bowl champions (1970–present) Conference champions Division champions Wild Card berth

As of December 31, 2017

Season Team League Conference Division Regular season Postseason results Awards
Finish Wins Losses Ties
2014 2014 NFL AFC South 3rd 3 13 0
2015 2015 NFL AFC South 3rd 5 11 0
2016 2016 NFL AFC South 4th 3 13 0
2017 2017 NFL AFC South 1st 10 6 0 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Bills) 10–3
Won Divisional Playoffs (Steelers) 45–42
Lost AFC Championship Game (Patriots) 24–20
2018 2018 NFL AFC South 4th 5 11 0

Current rosterEdit

Jacksonville Jaguars roster
Quarterbacks

Running backs

Wide receivers

Tight ends

Offensive linemen

Defensive linemen

Linebackers

Defensive backs

Special teams

Reserve lists

Practice squad

Rookies in italics

Roster updated December 13, 2019
Depth chartTransactions
53 active, 19 inactive, 10 practice squad

AFC rostersNFC rosters

Players of noteEdit

Retired numbersEdit

 
Pride of the Jaguars display in TIAA Bank Field.

Although not officially retired, the number 71 worn by offensive tackle Tony Boselli, the Jaguars' first-ever draft pick, has not been worn since his retirement in 2002.[34] According to team officials, while the number is not in circulation, the number (along with Fred Taylor's number 28) is officially available for use if the circumstances warrant it.[35]

Pride of the JaguarsEdit

A contest was held in July 2006 to name the club's ring of honor as "Pride of the Jaguars" was chosen with 36% of the vote.[36] It was unveiled during the 2006 season during a game against the New York Jets on October 8. Former offensive tackle Tony Boselli was the first player inducted.

On January 1, 2012, team owner Wayne Weaver and his wife Delores were added to the Pride of the Jaguars in their final game before the sale of the team to Shahid Khan. On June 7, 2012 the Jaguars announced Fred Taylor would be the next inductee into the Pride of the Jaguars.[37] He was officially inducted on September 30, 2012. Longtime Jaguars quarterback Mark Brunell was also inducted into the "Pride of the Jaguars" on December 15, 2013.[38] The most recent addition was WR Jimmy Smith, inducted in 2016.

Pride of the Jaguars
No. Player Position Seasons Inducted
71 Tony Boselli OT 1995–2001 2006
Wayne and Delores Weaver Owners 1993–2011 2012
28 Fred Taylor RB 1998–2008 2012
8 Mark Brunell QB 1995–2003 2013
82 Jimmy Smith WR 1995-2005 2016

Florida Sports Hall of FameEdit

All-time first-round draft picksEdit

Head coaches and coordinatorsEdit

Head coachesEdit

Offensive coordinatorsEdit

Name Tenure
Kevin Gilbride 1995–1996
Chris Palmer 1997–1998
Bobby Petrino 2001
Bill Musgrave 2003–2004
Carl Smith 2005–2006
Dirk Koetter 2007–2011
Bob Bratkowski 2012
Jedd Fisch 2013–2014
Greg Olson 2015–2016
Nathaniel Hackett 2016–2018
John DeFilippo 2019–present

Defensive coordinatorsEdit

Name Tenure
Dick Jauron 1995–1998
Dom Capers 1999–2000
Gary Moeller 2001
John Pease 2002
Mike Smith 2003–2007
Gregg Williams 2008
Mel Tucker 2009–2012
Bob Babich 2013–2015
Todd Wash 2016–present

Current coaching staffEdit

Jacksonville Jaguars staff
Front office
Head coaches
Offensive coaches
 
Defensive coaches
Special teams coaches
Strength and conditioning
  • Strength and conditioning – Tom Myslinski
  • Assistant strength and conditioning – Cedric Scott
  • Strength & conditioning associate – Sean Karpf
  • Strength & conditioning associate – Jess Langvardt
Coaching support staff
  • Director of team administration – Tyler Wolf
  • Assistant to the head coach & administrator of coaching operations – ElizaBeth Mayers

Coaching staff
Scouting
Staff directory
More NFL staffs

AFC East
BUF
MIA
NE
NYJ
North
BAL
CIN
CLE
PIT
South
HOU
IND
JAX
TEN
West
DEN
KC
LAC
OAK
NFC East
DAL
NYG
PHI
WAS
North
CHI
DET
GB
MIN
South
ATL
CAR
NO
TB
West
ARI
LAR
SF
SEA

Work in the communityEdit

 
Jacksonville Jaguars Foundation

The Jacksonville Jaguars Foundation was established in 1994, when the franchise deal was first announced.[39] Since then, the Foundation has given over $20 million to area efforts in community improvement.[40] The Foundation focuses on many initiatives, such as Honor Rows, anti-tobacco programs, NFL Play 60, and support for veterans.[41] The Foundation grants over $1 million annually to organizations that assist "economically and socially disadvantaged youth and families".[42]

The Jaguars' first head coach, Tom Coughlin, established the Tom Coughlin Jay Fund Foundation in 1996 to help young cancer victims and their families with emotional and financial assistance. The charity remained in Jacksonville after Coughlin left to coach the New York Giants.[43]

Broadcast mediaEdit

Media affiliates

RadioEdit

From their inaugural 1995 season until 2013, the Jaguars' flagship radio station was WOKV, which simulcasts on both AM 690 and on 104.5 FM.

Starting with the 2014 season, the team will be moving the broadcast to WJXL and WJXL-FM (1010 AM and 92.5 FM) and simulcast on 99.9 Gator Country[44]

Frank Frangie is the play-by-play announcer with former Jaguars players Tony Boselli and Jeff Lageman providing color analysis.

Jaguars Radio network affiliates
Market Frequency Call sign Branding
Jacksonville 1010 AM & 92.5 FM WJXL & WJXL-FM 1010XL
99.9 WGNE-FM 99.9 Gator Country
St. Augustine 1420 AM WAOC ESPN Radio 1420
Orlando 1080 AM WHOO Sports Talk 1080 The Team
Melbourne 1240 AM WMMB New Talk WMMB
Lake City 94.3 FM WNFB Mix 94.3
Ocala 900 AM WMOP ESPN Radio
Port St. Lucie 1590 AM WPSL 1590 WPSL
Gainesville 850 AM WRUF ESPN 850
Savannah, GA 104.3 FM and 1400 AM WSEG Star 1400
Brunswick, GA 107.7 FM WHFX 107.7 The Fox
Jesup, GA 105.5 FM WIFO Big Dog 105.5 Country
Waycross, GA 1150 AM WJEM The Jock 1150
Tallahassee 93.3 FM WVFT Talk Radio 93.3
Panama City 97.7 FM WYYX 97X
Palm Coast 1550 AM WNZF WNZF Newsradio
Kingsland, GA 106.3 FM WKBX KBAY 106.3

TelevisionEdit

WJAX-TV or WFOX-TV televises all preseason games and also televises regular season games that are televised nationally on ESPN or NFL Network.

Television affiliates
Market Station Notes
Jacksonville WJXX Monday Night Football Wild Card simucasted on ABC
WJAX-TV CBS games, Preseason Games, Games aired on ESPN
WFOX-TV Fox games, Preseason Games, Games aired on NFL Network
WTLV NBC games
Orlando WFTV Preseason games
Tallahassee WTXL-TV Preseason games
Gainesville WNBW-DT Preseason and NBC games
Savannah, GA WSAV-TV Preseason and NBC games
Dothan, AL WTVY Preseason and CBS regional/national games
Panama City WJHG-TV Preseason and NBC games
Valdosta/Albany, GA WSWG Preseason and CBS regional/national Games
Charleston, SC WTAT-TV Preseason and Fox regional/national games
Mobile, AL-Pensacola WPMI-TV Preseason and NBC games

See alsoEdit

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ Sexton, Brian (November 4, 2014). "Jaguars History". Jaguars.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Archived from the original on November 6, 2014. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Jaguars introduce new brand identity and campaign". Jaguars.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. February 5, 2013. Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  3. ^ "Jacksonville Jaguars Team Capsule" (PDF). 2018 Official National Football League Record and Fact Book. NFL Enterprises, LLC. August 9, 2018. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  4. ^ "Jacksonville Jaguars Team Encyclopedia". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
  5. ^ "Pakistani-born Khan approved as Jaguars' new owner". NFL.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Associated Press. December 14, 2011. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
  6. ^ Ozanian, Mike (November 29, 2011). "Jacksonville Jaguars Sold To Illinois Businessman For $770 Million". Forbes. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
  7. ^ Kurt Badenhausen. "Shahid Khan – Forbes". Forbes.
  8. ^ Oehser, John (February 6, 2013). "A new logo for a new era". Jaguars.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  9. ^ "JAGUARS UNVEIL NEW LOOK" (PDF). 2009 Jacksonville Jaguars Media Guide. NFL Properties, LLC. June 21, 2018. Retrieved May 7, 2019.
  10. ^ "Jaguars continue their offseason overhaul with new uniforms, logo". NFL.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. November 23, 2015. Retrieved November 23, 2015.
  11. ^ "Teal to become Jaguars' alternate jersey". Jaguars.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. September 27, 2012. Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  12. ^ "Jacksonville Jaguars and NIKE Unveil New Uniform Design for 2013". Jaguars.com (Press release). NFL Enterprises, LLC. April 23, 2013. Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  13. ^ Sessler, Marc (April 23, 2013). "Jacksonville Jaguars unveil their new team uniforms". NFL.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Retrieved April 24, 2013.
  14. ^ Ogus, Simon. "Jacksonville Jaguars And Tennessee Titans Unveil Latest Uniforms Of The NFL Color Rush Series". Forbes. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  15. ^ Jaguars Public Relations (April 19, 2018). "Jaguars unveil new Nike Vapor Untouchable uniforms". Jaguars.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  16. ^ Shook, Nick (April 19, 2018). "Jacksonville Jaguars unveil new old-school look". NFL.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2018.
  17. ^ Jacksonville.com (1999). "Jaxson De Villain". Jacksonville.com. Retrieved September 29, 2007.
  18. ^ Michael David Smith (2007). "Jaguars Mascot Jaxson de Ville Draws Ire of Colts President Bill Polian". sports.aol.com. Retrieved November 18, 2007.
  19. ^ Fox 30 Online (2007). "Jaguars Mascot Busted For Not Following Rules". Fox30.online.com. Retrieved November 18, 2007.
  20. ^ Teneshia L. Wright (2001). "Alltales: "Singer's Streak Hits Seven"". Jacksonville.com. Retrieved September 29, 2007.
  21. ^ Jaguars Press Release (2001). "Jaxson de Ville, the ROAR to Travel to Middle East to Visit U.S. Armed Forces". Jaguars.com. Retrieved September 29, 2007.
  22. ^ "Jacksonville Roar" Football Babble
  23. ^ a b "Cheerleader Auditions" Jacksonville Jaguars website
  24. ^ "Jaxson de Ville, the ROAR to Travel to Middle East to Visit U.S. Armed Forces", jaguars.com (Jaguars Press Release; 2001)
  25. ^ "Jaguars Notebook". Jacksonville.com. August 10, 2004. Retrieved September 3, 2012.
  26. ^ "City's take from stadium will go up". Jacksonville.com. September 8, 2007. Retrieved September 3, 2012.
  27. ^ "EverBank buying naming rights to Jacksonville Municipal Stadium".
  28. ^ Heilman, Phillip (February 16, 2018). "New name for Jaguars' stadium: TIAA Bank Field". Jacksonville.com. Retrieved February 17, 2018.
  29. ^ DiRocco, Michael. "Jaguars unveil mammoth video boards". ESPN.go.com. ESPN. Retrieved October 8, 2014.
  30. ^ Kuharsky, Paul. "Best divisional rivalry: Jaguars vs. Titans – AFC South Blog – ESPN". Espn.go.com. Retrieved September 3, 2012.
  31. ^ Bouchette, Ed (September 17, 2006). "Steelers-Jaguars rivalry born of inspiration and emulation". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
  32. ^ Belson, Ken (January 14, 2018). "Jaguars Upset Steelers, Continuing an N.F.L. Season of Surprise". The New York Times. Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  33. ^ Stites, Adam (May 20, 2019). "The Bills and Jags are becoming the NFL's silliest (and best) rivals". SBNation.com. Retrieved July 3, 2019.
  34. ^ "2013 NFL Record and Fact Book". Retrieved November 3, 2017.
  35. ^ http://www.jaguars.com/news/article-JaguarsNews/2013-NFL-Record-and-Fact-Book/9175294f-cd24-4231-b003-cb3c9bb2bbce
  36. ^ "'Honor ring' named". Jaguars.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. July 17, 2006. Retrieved July 5, 2012.
  37. ^ Oehser, John (June 7, 2012). "A special moment". Jaguars.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  38. ^ Oehser, John (October 1, 2013). "Brunell to enter Pride of the Jaguars". Jaguars.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Retrieved May 7, 2019.
  39. ^ "Jaguars Foundation - Jaguars.com". Retrieved October 9, 2012.
  40. ^ "Weavers select 38 charities for grants". Jacksonville.com. June 23, 2007. Retrieved September 3, 2012.
  41. ^ "Jaguars Media Guide – Foundation" (PDF). Retrieved October 9, 2012.
  42. ^ "Jaguars Foundation". Jaguars.com. Jaguars. Retrieved November 23, 2015.
  43. ^ "Tom Coughlin Jay Fund – Leadership". Tom Coughlin Jay Fund Foundation. Archived from the original on September 27, 2016.
  44. ^ "It's official: Jaguars change stations on radio, TV". The Florida Times-Union. March 19, 2014. Retrieved January 25, 2018.

External linksEdit