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Georgia State Route 85

State Route 85 (SR 85) is a 96.5-mile-long (155.3 km) state highway in the west-central part of the U.S. state of Georgia. It travels within portions of Muscogee, Harris, Talbot, Meriwether, Coweta, Fayette, and Clayton counties. It connects the Columbus and Forest Park areas, via Manchester, Woodbury, Senoia, Fayetteville, and Riverdale.

State Route 85 marker

State Route 85
Route information
Maintained by GDOT
Length96.5 mi[3] (155.3 km)
Existed1930[1][2]–present
Major junctions
South end US 27 / SR 1 in Columbus
 
North end I-75 in Forest Park
Location
CountiesMuscogee, Harris, Talbot, Meriwether, Coweta, Fayette, Clayton
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
I-85SR 86

Route descriptionEdit

SR 85 begins at an intersection with US 27/SR 1 (Veterans Parkway) in downtown Columbus, within Muscogee County. It heads west on 14th Street, before turning north on 2nd Avenue. It continues to the north, until it meets the southern terminus of SR 22 Connector, which takes on the "2nd Avenue" name. At this intersection, SR 85 heads east on Manchester Expressway and meets SR 219 (River Road) before it has a second intersection with US 27/SR 1 (Veterans Parkway). At this intersection, US 27 Alternate begins, running concurrent with SR 85. The two routes continue to the east, to an interchange with Interstate 185 (I-185), then curve to the northeast on the south side of Peachtree Mall, which is located just south of the Columbus Airport. Just past the mall, the highways become a limited-access highway. They have an interchange with Warm Springs Road, which leads to Cooper Creek Park. They head to an interchange with Miller Road, which leads to the neighborhood of Crystal Valley. To the northeast is US 80/SR 22/SR 540. Then, they meet County Line Road, which leads to Midland. This road is actually about 3,000 feet (910 m) south of the Muscogee–Harris county line. In Harris County, the concurrency skirts past the Woodland Hills Golf Course. Just before entering Ellerslie, the limited-access highway ends. A little while later, SR 315 joins the concurrency, and leaves it in town. US 27 Alternate/SR 85 head to Waverly Hall, where they intersect SR 208. On the Harris–Talbot county line, the two routes meet SR 85 Alternate/SR 116. At this intersection, US 27 Alternate north/SR 85 Alternate north/SR 116 west take the left fork, on Warm Springs Road, while SR 85 north/SR 116 east take the right one. Less than 0.5 miles (0.80 km) into Talbot County, SR 116 splits off to the east, while SR 85 continues to the northeast. Just before entering Manchester is SR 41, which begins a short concurrency. Almost immediately, the two routes cross into Meriwether County and enter Manchester. They intersect the eastern terminus of SR 190 (Pine Mountain Highway) just after the city limits. At 2nd Street, SR 41 departs to the northwest, while SR 85 heads into downtown Manchester. At Foster Street, SR 85 turns to the east, while SR 85 Spur continues straight ahead, on Truitt Street. In Woodbury, it meets SR 18/SR 74/SR 109 (Woodbury Highway). At this intersection, SR 74 turns to the north, concurrent with SR 85. They reach the northern terminus of SR 85 Alternate (Whitehouse Parkway). Farther to the north-northwest, in Gay, is the eastern terminus of SR 109 Spur (Greenville Street). In the unincorporated community of Alps, they intersect SR 362, which briefly joins the concurrency. Less than 3 miles (4.8 km) later, they reach the Meriwether–Coweta county line. The concurrent highways pass through Haralson and enter the southeast part of Senoia. There, they intersect with SR 16 (Wells Street). Less than 2 miles (3.2 km) later, they cross over Line Creek, into Fayette County. They enter Starrs Mill, where SR 74 (Joel Cowan Parkway) departs to the northwest, while SR 85 continues to the northeast. In Fayetteville, it intersects SR 92, which forms a concurrency through the city. Then, they intersect SR 54. After that, SR 92 departs to the northwest. Next, is the southern terminus of SR 314. Farther on, in Kenwood, is the southern terminus of SR 279. After that, SR 85 crosses over Camp Creek, into Clayton County. On the southwestern edge of Riverdale, it intersects SR 138. Approximately 2,000 feet (610 m) later is the southern terminus of SR 139 (Church Street). Farther to the north-northeast is the western terminus of SR 331 (Forest Parkway), which the northbound lanes of SR 85 have to take to access I-75. SR 85's northbound lanes continue for another 3,000 feet (910 m), and then they end at a U-turn to go back to the south. However, the southbound lanes actually start at I-75, approximately 1,500 feet (460 m) farther to the north-northeast.[3]

There are two sections of SR 85 that are part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility:

  • From its southern terminus to the town of Ellerslie
  • From its intersection with SR 54 in Fayetteville to its northern terminus[4][5]

Major intersectionsEdit

CountyLocationmi[3]kmDestinationsNotes
MuscogeeColumbus0.00.0   US 27 / SR 1 (Veterans Parkway)Southern terminus
2.64.2  SR 22 Conn. west (2nd Avenue)Eastern terminus of SR 22 Conn.
3.04.8  SR 219 (River Road) – LaGrange
3.55.6    US 27 / SR 1 (Veterans Parkway) / US 27 Alt. southSouth end of US 27 Alt. concurrency
4.87.7  I-185 (SR 411) – Fort Benning, AtlantaI-185 exit 7
6.911.1Warm Springs Road Interchange
9.114.6Miller Road Interchange
10.316.6    US 80 / SR 22 (J.R. Allen Parkway) / SR 540 (Fall Line Freeway) – Phenix City, Macon, AugustaInterchange
15.925.6County Line Road Interchange
Harris17.828.6  SR 315 west – CataulaSouth end of SR 315 concurrency
Ellerslie18.329.5  SR 315 east (Talbotton Road) – TalbottonNorth end of SR 315 concurrency
Waverly Hall24.138.8  SR 208 – Talbotton
HarrisTalbot
county line
31.250.2    US 27 Alt. north / SR 85 Alt. north / SR 116 west (Warm Springs Road) – ShilohNorth end of US 27 Alt. concurrency; south end of SR 116 concurrency; southern terminus of SR 85 Alt.
Talbot31.650.9  SR 116 east – WoodlandNorth end of SR 116 concurrency
37.460.2  SR 41 south – WoodlandSouth end of SR 41 concurrency
MeriwetherManchester37.860.8  SR 190 west (Pine Mountain Highway) – Pine MountainEastern terminus of SR 190
38.361.6  SR 41 north (2nd Street) – Warm SpringsNorth end of SR 41 concurrency
38.862.4  SR 85 Spur west (Truitt Street)Eastern terminus of SR 85 Spur
Woodbury48.578.1    SR 18 / SR 74 east / SR 109 (Woodbury Highway)South end of SR 74 concurrency
49.279.2  SR 85 Alt. south (Whitehouse Parkway) – Warm SpringsNorthern terminus of SR 85 Alt.
Gay56.390.6  SR 109 Spur west (Greenville Street) – GreenvilleEastern terminus of SR 109 Spur
Alps61.398.7  SR 362 west (Callaway Road) – GreenvilleSouth end of SR 362 concurrency
62.2100.1  SR 362 east (Griffin Highway) – GriffinNorth end of SR 362 concurrency
CowetaSenoia71.2114.6  SR 16 (Wells Street) – Newnan, Griffin
FayetteStarrs Mill74.3119.6  SR 74 west (Joel Cowan Parkway) – Peachtree CityNorth end of SR 74 concurrency
Fayetteville82.3132.4  SR 92 south – GriffinSouth end of SR 92 concurrency
83.6134.5  SR 54 east (Stonewall Avenue East) – JonesboroEastbound one-way part of SR 54
83.6134.5  SR 54 west (Lanier Avenue) – Peachtree CityWestbound one-way part of SR 54
84.2135.5  SR 92 north – FairburnNorth end of SR 92 concurrency
84.8136.5  SR 314 north – College ParkSouthern terminus of SR 314
88.3142.1  SR 279 north – College ParkSouthern terminus of SR 279
ClaytonRiverdale91.2146.8  SR 138 – Union City, Jonesboro
91.6147.4  SR 139 north (Church Street) – College ParkSouthern terminus of SR 139
95.8154.2   SR 331 east (Forest Parkway) to I-75 – Forest Park, Lake CityWestern terminus of SR 85; northbound SR 85 traffic must take this to access I-75.
96.4155.1U-turn back to southbound SR 85Northbound lanes are closed, so traffic must U-turn back to the south
96.8155.8  I-75 (SR 401)No entrance ramps from SR 85 north to I-75 or vice versa; I-75 exit 237A
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

HistoryEdit

1930sEdit

In 1930, SR 85 was established from Columbus to SR 41 in Warm Springs, with the Muscogee County portion and a small portion just slightly north of the Muscogee–Harris county line having a completed hard surface.[1][2] By the middle of 1933, the portion of the highway from about Ellerslie to Warm Springs had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[6][7] The next year, the segment of the highway just south-southwest of Warm Springs was shifted westward to a curve into the city.[8][9] In 1935, SR 85 was extended southeast on SR 41 to Manchester and then north-northeast through Woodbury and Senoia and into Fayetteville.[10][11] At the end of 1936, two segments were under construction: around Shiloh and just west-southwest of Warm Springs.[12][13] A few months later, SR 85 was extended north-northeast to US 19/US 41/SR 3 in Hapeville.[13][14] By the middle of the year, a portion from approximately halfway between Waverly Hall and Shiloh to Warm Springs was under construction.[14][15] Near the end of the year, the entire highway from Columbus to just south-southwest of Waverly Hall had a completed hard surface. A portion north-northeast of Waverly Hall was under construction, while the rest of the Waverly Hall–Warm Springs segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[15][16] In 1938, a portion about halfway between Woodbury and Gay was under construction. A portion south of the Meriwether–Coweta county line under construction, as well. The portion just north-northeast of Riverdale was under construction, while the rest of the Riverdale–Hapeville segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[17][18] By mid-1939, a small portion just south of Waverly Hall had a completed hard surface.[18][19] Near the end of the year, a small portion just north-northeast of Senoia had a completed hard surface.[19][20] The year ended with the segment from Waverly Hall to Warm Springs having a completed hard surface.[20][21]

1940sEdit

In 1940, SR 163 was built from Warm Springs to Woodbury. From Manchester to approximately halfway between it and Woodbury, as well as the Gay–Oakland and Clayton County portions, SR 85 was under construction. From approximately halfway between Woodbury and Gay into Gay, SR 85 had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[22][23] By the middle of 1941, SR 163's segment just northeast of Warm Springs was under construction.[24][25] At the end of the year, a portion of SR 85 just east-northeast of Manchester, as well as a segment from the Fayette–Clayton county line to Riverdale, had a completed hard surface. At this time, a portion of the highway from south of Woodbury had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[25][26] In 1942, a portion of SR 163 northeast of Warm Springs, as well as the Fayette County portion of the Fayetteville–Riverdale segment of SR 85, had completed grading, but was not surfaced. SR 85, from north-northeast of Starrs Mill to Fayetteville was under construction.[26][27] The next year, a portion northeast of Manchester had a completed hard surface.[27][28] In 1944, a portion south of Woodbury had a sand clay or top soil surface. Also, the Gay–Alvaton segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[28] By the end of 1946, SR 85 was shifted eastward to a more direct path between Columbus and Manchester. Its old path between south of Shiloh and Warm Springs was redesignated as a southerly extension of SR 163. SR 85 Spur was built in Manchester from SR 41 to SR 85. The entire length of SR 85 from Columbus to Chalybeate Springs had a completed hard surface. A small portion north-northeast of Chalybeate Springs had a sand clay or top soil surface; the portion from there to Woodbury had a completed hard surface.[29][30] Between 1946 and 1948, the Chalybeate Springs–Woodbury and Starrs Mill–Hapeville segments had a completed hard surface, while the Woodbury–Senoia segment had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[30][31] The next year, from Woodbury to just north-northwest of Gay, SR 85 had a completed hard surface.[31][32]

1950sEdit

By the middle of 1950, US 27 Alt. was designated on SR 85 between Columbus and a point south of Shiloh and on SR 163 from there to Warm Springs. The segment of SR 85 from just north-northwest of Gay to Starrs Mill had a completed hard surface.[32][33] By 1952, SR 163 was redesignated as SR 85W.[33][34] That year, SR 85W's segment south of Warm Springs was reverted to being designated as SR 163.[34][35] The next year, this was undone. Also, the segment of SR 85W from Warm Springs to Woodbury had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[35][36] By the middle of 1955, this segment was hard surfaced.[37][38] Two years later, SR 85 from south of Shiloh to Woodbury was redesignated as SR 85E.[38][39]

1960s to 1990sEdit

Between 1960 and 1963, US 27 Alt. was shifted eastward onto SR 85E from south of Shiloh to Manchester.[40][41] Between 1963 and 1966, the northern terminus was truncated to its current location in the extreme western part of Forest Park.[41][42] About thirty years later, SR 85W was redesignated SR 85 Alt., while SR 85E was redesignated as part of the SR 85 mainline again.[43][44]

Special routesEdit

State Route 85 AlternateEdit

 

State Route 85 Alternate
LocationSouth of Shiloh to Woodbury
Length18.7 mi[45] (30.1 km)
Existed1995[43][44]–present

State Route 85 Alternate (SR 85 Alt.) is a 18.7-mile-long (30.1 km) alternate route of SR 85 that connects the Shiloh and Woodbury areas, via Warm Springs. From its southern terminus to Warm Springs, it is concurrent with U.S. Route 27 Alternate (US 27 Alt.).[45]

SR 85 Alt. is not part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[4]

The highway that would eventually become SR 85 Alt. was established in 1930, SR 85 was established from south of Shiloh to SR 41 in Warm Springs, with the Muscogee County portion and a small portion just slightly north of the Muscogee–Harris county line having a completed hard surface.[1][2] By the middle of 1933, the portion of the highway from about Ellerslie to Warm Springs had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[6][7] The next year, the segment of the highway just south-southwest of Warm Springs was shifted westward to a curve into the city.[8][9] At the end of 1936, two segments were under construction: around Shiloh and just west-southwest of Warm Springs.[12][13] By the middle of the year, a portion from approximately halfway between Waverly Hall and Shiloh to Warm Springs was under construction.[14][15] Near the end of the year, the entire highway from Columbus to just south-southwest of Waverly Hall had a completed hard surface. A portion north-northeast of Waverly Hall was under construction, while the rest of the Waverly Hall–Warm Springs segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[15][16] By mid-1939, a small portion just south of Waverly Hall had a completed hard surface.[18][19] The year ended with the segment from Waverly Hall to Warm Springs having a completed hard surface.[20][21]

In 1940, SR 163 was built from Warm Springs to Woodbury.[22][23] By the middle of 1941, SR 163's segment just northeast of Warm Springs was under construction.[24][25] In 1942, a portion of SR 163 northeast of Warm Springs had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[26][27] By the end of 1946, SR 85 was shifted eastward to a more direct path between Columbus and Manchester. Its old path between south of Shiloh and Warm Springs was redesignated as a southerly extension of SR 163.[29][30] By the middle of 1950, US 27 Alt. was designated on SR 163 from south of Shiloh to Warm Springs.[32][33] By 1952, SR 163 was redesignated as SR 85W.[33][34] That year, SR 85W's segment south of Warm Springs was reverted to being designated as SR 163.[34][35] The next year, this was undone. Also, the segment of SR 85W from Warm Springs to Woodbury had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[35][36] By the middle of 1955, this segment was hard surfaced.[37][38] Between 1960 and 1963, US 27 Alt. was shifted eastward off of SR 85W and onto SR 85E.[40][41] About thirty-three years later, SR 85W was redesignated as SR 85 Alt.[43][44]


CountyLocationmi[45]kmDestinationsNotes
HarrisTalbot
county line
0.00.0    US 27 Alt. south / SR 85 / SR 116 east – Columbus, ManchesterSouthern terminus; south end of US 27 Alt. and SR 116 concurrencies
HarrisShiloh1.82.9  SR 116 west – HamiltonNorth end of SR 116 concurrency
Talbot
No major junctions
MeriwetherF. D. Roosevelt State Park5.08.0  SR 190 (Pine Mountain Highway) – Pine Mountain, Manchester
Warm Springs8.513.7   US 27 Alt. north / SR 41 (Spring Street) – Greenville, ManchesterNorth end of US 27 Alt. concurrency
12.920.8  SR 173 south (Raleigh Road) – ManchesterNorthern terminus of SR 173
Woodbury17.127.5   SR 18 / SR 109 (Main Street) – Greenville, Molena
18.730.1   SR 74 / SR 85 (Oakland Road) – Manchester, Thomaston, GayNorthern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 85 SpurEdit

 

State Route 85 Spur
LocationManchester
Length0.80 mi[46] (1.3 km)
Existed1946[29][30]–present

State Route 85 Spur (SR 85 Spur) is a spur route of SR 85 that exists completely within the city limits of Manchester. It connects SR 41 (North 5th Avenue) with the SR 85 mainline. It is used to bypass downtown Manchester.[46]

SR 85 Spur is not part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[4]

By the end of 1946, SR 85 Spur was built in Manchester from SR 41 to SR 85.[29][30]

The entire route is in Manchester, Meriwether County.

mi[46]kmDestinationsNotes
0.00.0  SR 41 (North 5th Avenue) – Talbotton, Warm SpringsWestern terminus
0.81.3  SR 85 (Truitt Street/Foster Street) – Columbus, WoodburyEastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1929). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (June 1930). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c Google (July 21, 2013). "Overview map of SR 85" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved July 21, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c "National Highway System: Georgia" (PDF). United States Department of Transportation. October 1, 2012. Retrieved July 21, 2013.
  5. ^ "National Highway System: Atlanta, GA" (PDF). United States Department of Transportation. October 1, 2012. Retrieved July 21, 2013.
  6. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (November 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  7. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (May 1933). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  8. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (April–May 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  9. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  10. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1935). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  11. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1935). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  12. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1936). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  13. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  14. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  15. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  16. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  17. ^ Georgia State Highway Board (January 1, 1938). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  18. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (September 1, 1938). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  19. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1939). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  20. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1939). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  21. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1940). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  22. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1940). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  23. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1940). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  24. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1941). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  25. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1941). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  26. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1942). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  27. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1943). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  28. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1944). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  29. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1945). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  30. ^ a b c d e State Highway Department of Georgia (1946). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017. (Corrected to November 7, 1946.)
  31. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1948). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017. (Corrected to February 28, 1948.)
  32. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (1949). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017. (Corrected to April 1, 1949.)
  33. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (1950). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017. (Corrected to August 1, 1950.)
  34. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (1952). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017. (Corrected to January 1, 1952.)
  35. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1953). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017. (Corrected to January 1, 1953.)
  36. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1953). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017. (Corrected to September 1, 1953.)
  37. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1954). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017. (Corrected to June 1, 1954.)
  38. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (1955). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017. (Corrected to June 1, 1955.)
  39. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1957). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017. (Corrected to July 1, 1957.)
  40. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1960). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map) (1960–1961 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017. (Corrected to June 1, 1960.)
  41. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (1963). State Highway System and Other Principal Connecting Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 23, 2017. (Corrected to June 1, 1963.)
  42. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1966). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  43. ^ a b c Georgia Department of Transportation (1995). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1995–1996 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  44. ^ a b c Georgia Department of Transportation (1996). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1996–1997 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  45. ^ a b c Google (July 21, 2013). "Overview map of SR 85 Alt." (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved July 21, 2013.
  46. ^ a b c Google (July 22, 2013). "Overview map of SR 85 Spur" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved July 22, 2013.

External linksEdit