Ubay, Bohol

(Redirected from Gabi, Ubay)

Ubay, officially the Municipality of Ubay (Cebuano: Munisipyo sa Ubay; Tagalog: Bayan ng Ubay), is a fast growing 1st class municipality in the province of Bohol, Philippines. Based on the 2020 Philippine Statistics Authority census, it has a population of 81,799 people which is projected to grow to 100,000 in 2030.[5]

Ubay
Municipality of Ubay
Downtown Ubay
Flag of Ubay
Official seal of Ubay
Nickname: 
Dairy Capital of Bohol
Map of Bohol with Ubay highlighted
Map of Bohol with Ubay highlighted
OpenStreetMap
Map
Ubay is located in Philippines
Ubay
Ubay
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 10°03′22″N 124°28′23″E / 10.056°N 124.47294°E / 10.056; 124.47294
CountryPhilippines
RegionCentral Visayas
ProvinceBohol
District 2nd district
Founded
Chartered
1821[1]
Barangays44 (see Barangays)
Government
[3]
 • TypeSangguniang Bayan
 • MayorConstantino H. Reyes
 • Vice MayorVictor A. Bonghanoy
 • RepresentativeMa. Vanessa C. Aumentado
 • Municipal Council
Members
 • Electorate50,205 voters (2022)
Area
 • Land258.1328 km2 (99.6656 sq mi)
Elevation
14 m (46 ft)
Highest elevation
171 m (561 ft)
Lowest elevation
0 m (0 ft)
Population
 (2020 census)[5]
 • Total81,799
 • Households
19,299
Economy
 • Income class1st municipal income class
 • Poverty incidence
25.70
% (2018)[6]
 • Revenue₱ 301.1 million (2020)
 • Assets₱ 524.7 million (2020)
 • Expenditure₱ 321.6 million (2020)
 • Liabilities₱ 126.5 million (2020)
Service provider
 • ElectricityBohol 2 Electric Cooperative (BOHECO 2)
Time zoneUTC+8 (PST)
ZIP code
6315
PSGC
IDD:area code+63 (0)38
Native languagesCebuano
Boholano dialect
Tagalog
Patron saintChrist Child

Ubay is in the northeast of the province, and has an uncontested area of 258.132847 square kilometers (25,813.2847 hectares) and has a contested area of 5.87 square kilometers (587.8688 hectares) with other Municipality per certification issued by the Land Management Bureau(LMB) of the DENR. It has a 61 kilometres (38 mi) of coastline. It is the largest (estimated eight times (8x) larger than the capital city of Tagbilaran) and most populated municipality in Bohol.[7]

Etymology edit

 
Poblacion area

One etymology derivation is that the town's name is a contraction of the term ubay-ubay, meaning "alongside".[7]

According to Kaufmann's Visayan-English dictionary,[8] the Visayan word "ubay" means:

  1. to accompany other in bed or along the side, be they persons or animals;
  2. the flow of rivers and streams. from one place to another.

The flow of seawater between the mainland and the island of Lapinig Grande (now Pres. C.P. Garcia town) could justify the second definition of Ubay. It is a situation that is permanent and the constant reference to the flow of water can make the term ubay be attached as the name of the place.[9]

An alternative derivation is that the term 'ubay-ubay' or 'alongside' became the byword of seafarers who used to travel close to the shorelines of Ubay to avoid the strong current of the Canigao Channel.[10] There was a single path to follow reach the island trading centres. This trail was located alongside (ubay) the sandy beach. Later on the term Ubay became the original name of the community.

History edit

Historically, Ubay was part of Talibon, when the latter was established as a town in civil aspect in 1722.[1] During Spanish period, a town has two aspects - religious, headed by the parish priest and civil aspect, headed by a gobernadorcillo. Religious aspect was then superior to civil aspect since it was commonly headed by a Spanish priest.[11][10]

In 1744, the Dagohoy Revolution started, controlling the entire northeastern part of the province, stretching from Duero to Inabanga. As the revolution progresses, Jesuit were replaced by Augustinian Recollects in Bohol in 1768 led by Fr. Pedro de Santa Barbara, who travelled through mountains with proposals of peace and resettlement for Dagohoy and its followers. Through his untiring intrepidness, later on, pacified patriots together with their cluster chieftains chose to resettle in southern coastal towns. Later in 1794, Fr. Manuel de la Consolacion, then parish priest of Inabanga, successfully brought hundreds of followers and resetlled them in towns of Talibon and Inabanga, as well in the barangays (villages) of San Pedro (Talibon), Pangpang (Buenavista), and Ubay.[12] Therefore, much of early residents of Ubay were followers of Dagohoy.

In 1821, Ubay became an independent town from Talibon in civil aspect.[1] Its religious aspect was then still administered by the parish of Inabanga, until Talibon was able to establish a separate parish in 1831, making Ubay a visita. Residents clamor for an independent parish until a Catholic church was built.

On January 15, 1876, an independent parish was finally established during the time of gobernadorcillo Toribio Reyes, who donated its location site and its church bell. This also marked its first town fiesta. Later on, the date of town fiesta was moved every last Friday of January in commemoration and honor of their patron saint, Holy Child.[13] Ubayanons often come home during fiesta to share the joy of reviving the beautiful old story on the origin of the place.[14]

The official religious aspect of the town was established much later than the civil aspect. The decree of the Spanish Governor General Domingo Moriones y Murillo creating Ubay as a town in the religious aspect is on October 22, 1877. However, Royal Order No. 695 issued by the King of Spain Alfonso XII has the date 5 October 1877.[9]

On March 6, 1902, the entire municipality of Batuanan (now Alicia ) was consolidated with Ubay through Philippine Commission Act No. 370[15]

On October 31, 1903, the old municipality of Ipil (now Trinidad) was divided into two. With Ipil River as demarcation line, the left bank was annexed to Talibon while the right bank was consolidated with Ubay. Furthermore, barangay Cabulao and the previously annexed municipality of Batuanan was separated from Ubay, together with barangay Libas, Candijay to create the new and distinct municipality of Mabini in virtue of Philippine Commission Act No. 968.[16]

On September 1, 1947, the municipality of Ipil was reorganized, joining the barangays of Guinobatan, Mahagbu, and Tagum from Ubay together with other barangays of Talibon to create the renamed municipality of Trinidad through Executive Order No. 80.[17]

On June 21, 1956, barangay Babag separated from Ubay together with other barangays of Carmen, Sierra-Bullones, and Trinidad to form the new municipality of Dagohoy through Executive Order No. 184.[18]

On March 14, 1961, barangays of Corazon and Magsaysay separated from Ubay together with other barangays of Trinidad to form the independent municipality of San Miguel through Executive Order No. 423.[19]

On December 29, 1961, barangay San Isidro (not the present San Isidro, Ubay) separated from Ubay, together with other barangays of Candijay, Guindulman, and Sierra-Bullones to create the municipality of Pilar through Executive Order No. 460.[20]

On June 21, 1969, barangays of Aguining, Basiao, Bonbonon, Gaus, Pitogo, and Tugas separated from Ubay to create the independent municipality of Pitogo in virtue of Republic Act 5867.[21] It was later renamed President Carlos P. Garcia in honor of the 8th president of the Philippines on October 27, 1977 through Presidential Decree No. 1228.[22]

Science Cityhood edit

House Bill No. 5203 was filed by the 2nd district representative Congresswoman Maria Vanessa C. Aumentado last September 27, 2021 for the conversion of the municipality of Ubay into a component city to be known as the Science City of Ubay in the province of Bohol.[23] The bill was referred to the Committee on Local Government in the House of representatives. If enacted, it will be the second Science CIty in the country next to the Science City of Muñoz.

Geography edit

The town is situated east of Trinidad, north of Alicia and Mabini, and northeast of San Miguel. It is 130 kilometres (81 mi) northeast of Tagbilaran.

Climate edit

Ubay
Average annual temperature in Ubay is 27·2°C
Humidity 75–85%

Climate chart (explanation)
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
 
 
191
 
 
30
22
 
 
111
 
 
30
22
 
 
94
 
 
31
23
 
 
58
 
 
32
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106
 
 
33
24
 
 
154
 
 
32
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210
 
 
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204
 
 
31
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222
 
 
31
23
 
 
192
 
 
30
23
Average max. and min. temperatures in °C
Precipitation totals in mm
Source: Climate: Ubay
Imperial conversion
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
7.5
 
 
86
72
 
 
4.4
 
 
86
72
 
 
3.7
 
 
88
73
 
 
2.3
 
 
89
74
 
 
4.2
 
 
91
75
 
 
6.1
 
 
90
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8.3
 
 
89
75
 
 
6.3
 
 
89
75
 
 
7.3
 
 
89
74
 
 
8
 
 
89
74
 
 
8.7
 
 
88
74
 
 
7.6
 
 
87
73
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches

The climate is typically equatorial – temperature range over the year is less than three degrees Celsius (5.4 deg F), and annual rainfall exceeds 1,500 millimetres (59 in). The dry season starts in February and lasts through April sometimes extending to mid‑May. The climate in Ubay falls within Coronas climate type IV, characterized by not very pronounced maximum rainfall with a short dry season from one to three months and a wet season of nine to ten months.[24]

Ubay has a tropical climate. Most months of the year are marked by significant precipitation, making agriculture favorable – it supports at least two rice crops per year. The short dry season has little impact. Ubay is classified as Am (Tropical monsoon climate) by Köppen–Geiger climate classification system.

Barangays edit

 
Map of Ubay showing barangays and islands

Ubay is politically subdivided into 44 barangays. Each barangay consists of puroks and some have sitios.

These barnagys are organized into eight urban districts (UD):

PSGC Barangay Population ±% p.a. Area PD2020 UD Date of Fiesta
2020[5] 2010[25] ha acre /km2 /sq mi
071246001 Achila 1.7% 1,429 1,276 1.14% 384949 370 960 IV 15 January
071246002 Bay‑ang 2.3% 1,906 1,656 1.42% 6321,562 300 780 III 21 May
071246005 Benliw 2.7% 2,193 2,223 −0.14% 5891,455 370 960 VII 13 May
071246004 Biabas 3.2% 2,599 2,573 0.10% 2,2005,436 120 310 VIII 17 May
071246007 Bongbong 1.1% 895 807 1.04% 161398 560 1,400 II 8 December
071246008 Bood 3.5% 2,833 2,717 0.42% 152376 1,900 4,800 V 15 January
071246009 Buenavista 0.9% 709 688 0.30% 6511,609 110 280 I Last Saturday of April
29 Apr 2023
27 Apr 2024
26 Apr 2025
071246055 Bulilis 2.5% 2,046 1,711 1.80% 7401,829 280 720 II 8 December
071246011 Cagting 2.1% 1,712 1,597 0.70% 1,0442,580 160 420 VII 24 January
071246027 Calanggaman 2.1% 1,689 1,623 0.40% 6181,527 270 710 III 8 December
071246056 California 1.2% 941 801 1.62% 319788 290 760 II 13 May
071246012 Camali‑an 0.8% 642 581 1.00% 5321,315 120 310 III 26 November
071246013 Camambugan 3.2% 2,591 2,251 1.42% 5471,352 470 1,200 IV 15 May
071246015 Casate 3.3% 2,661 2,512 0.58% 4601,137 580 1,500 IV 5 April
071246017 Cuya 0.7% 538 516 0.42% 66163 820 2,100 VIII 6 February
071246018 Fatima 4.1% 3,340 3,235 0.32% 66163 5,100 13,000 V 13 May
071246019 Gabi 1.8% 1,432 1,378 0.39% 1,6464,067 87 230 II 9 December
071246020 Governor Boyles 1.1% 885 888 −0.03% 8242,036 110 280 I 15 May
071246021 Guintabo‑an 0.8% 676 686 −0.15% 66163 1,000 2,700 VIII 15 January
071246022 Hambabauran 1.5% 1,205 1,106 0.86% 5211,287 230 600 III 15 January
071246023 Humayhumay 2.2% 1,802 1,708 0.54% 8152,014 220 570 IV 14 February
071246024 Ilihan 0.9% 768 802 −0.43% 6831,688 110 290 I 15 May
071246025 Imelda 2.3% 1,865 1,761 0.58% 6571,624 280 740 VII 8 May &
27 November
071246026 Juagdan 1.4% 1,185 1,121 0.56% 121299 980 2,500 VII 23 May
071246016 Katarungan 2.1% 1,680 1,524 0.98% 4091,011 410 1,100 V 30 May
071246031 Lomangog 3.2% 2,650 2,025 2.73% 6421,586 410 1,100 II 15 January
071246030 Los Angeles 0.7% 601 436 3.26% 274677 220 570 II 27 April
071246032 Pag‑asa 1.6% 1,273 1,168 0.86% 378934 340 870 III 8 December
071246033 Pangpang 1.6% 1,328 1,220 0.85% 4501,112 300 760 IV 15 December
071246034 Poblacion 4.1% 3,331 3,633 −0.86% 199492 1,700 4,300 V Last Friday of January
27 Jan 2023
26 Jan 2024
31 Jan 2025
071246037 San Francisco 2.1% 1,688 1,677 0.07% 1,1072,736 150 390 I 26 June
071246038 San Isidro 0.9% 771 707 0.87% 262647 290 760 VI 21 May
071246040 San Pascual 4.6% 3,783 3,127 1.92% 9732,404 390 1,000 I Last Saturday of April
29 Apr 2023
27 Apr 2024
26 Apr 2025
071246041 San Vicente 1.3% 1,056 1,074 −0.17% 9662,387 110 280 VIII 5 April
071246043 Sentinela 1.1% 939 969 −0.31% 271670 350 900 VI 29 May
071246044 Sinandigan 2.7% 2,242 1,874 1.81% 6071,500 370 960 VII 8 December
071246045 Tapal 1.9% 1,516 1,371 1.01% 290717 520 1,400 VI 3 May
071246046 Tapon 3.5% 2,828 2,481 1.32% 153378 1,800 4,800 V 29 June
071246047 Tintinan 0.9% 707 623 1.27% 3177 2,300 5,900 VIII 29 September
071246048 Tipolo 3.1% 2,526 2,456 0.28% 6551,619 390 1,000 VI 5 April
071246049 Tubog 1.2% 983 885 1.06% 5141,270 190 500 III 16 May
071246050 Tuboran 1.7% 1,394 1,372 0.16% 5471,352 250 660 IV 15 January
071246052 Union 2.9% 2,392 2,332 0.25% 5141,270 470 1,200 VI 15 January
071246054 Villa Teresita 1.8% 1,482 1,407 0.52% 262647 570 1,500 I 28 November
Total 81,799 68,578 1.78% 33,506 82,795 240 630

Demographics edit

Population census of Ubay
YearPop.±% p.a.
1903 7,355—    
1918 8,255+0.77%
1939 21,213+4.60%
1948 29,961+3.91%
1960 34,090+1.08%
YearPop.±% p.a.
1970 32,717−0.41%
1975 34,195+0.89%
1980 38,289+2.29%
1990 48,902+2.48%
1995 50,745+0.70%
YearPop.±% p.a.
2000 59,827+3.59%
2007 65,900+1.34%
2010 68,578+1.46%
2015 73,712+1.38%
2020 81,799+2.07%
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[26][25][27]

When the first national census was held in 1903, the municipality had a population 7,355. It continued to grow until 1960 with 34,090 (annual growth rate of 2.73% over the period). The population markedly decreased in 1970 with the creation of the municipality of President Carlos P. Garcia, formerly a constituent barangay. Since 1970, average annual growth rate (1970–2020) is 1.85%.

The primary language is Cebuano: Filipino and English are understood to a limited degree.

Economy edit

 
Public market

Ubay has a number of business establishments commercial trading firms engaged in retail and wholesale. The new public market building was completed in 2000. The regular market day is Monday and local traders from neighboring towns come to sell their merchandise consisting mostly of agricultural products and small consumer items like used clothes, household utensils, and other products. Ubay also provides a market for the neighboring island municipality of Pres. Carlos P. Garcia, Municipality of Bien Unido , Alica and Mabini. Another well-known public market is located in barangay San Pascual, south of the municipality.[35]

Ubay is one of the growth centers in and considered the dairy capital of the province where the Philippine Carabao Center (PCC), National Dairy Authority (NDA) and the Ubay Stock Farm the largest and oldest livestock in the country with more than 3,000 hectares is located in the Municipality. The Municipality is also center for agri-industrial production and the biggest producers of poultry products in central visayas produced by the Marcela Farms Inc. (Alturas group of companies) located in Barangay Lomangog produce tons of poultry products like dress chicken. Ubay is also one of the top producers of fish products as it has more than 1,000 hectares of fishpond. The Municipality is a center for agriculture with government establishments like the Philippine Coconut Authority (PCA), the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR), Bohol Experiential Station (BES), Bureau of Soil and Water Management (BSWM) and the Central Visayas Integrated Agricultural Research Center (CENVIARC) are located. The Municipality is also considered the rice granary of the province with 51% of its total land area is intended for agriculture in which majority of its rice fields are irrigated.

Tourism and culture edit

 
Santo Niño Parish Church, Población
 
Ubay Green Park, Imelda

Ubay is the center of Eco-Agri Tourism considering its grass land area of the Ubay Stock Farm with carabaos and cows that similar to the scenery of New Zealand plus the learning experience you will gain when you visit their Department of Agriculture Facilities.

Delicacies edit

  • Ube Calamay: It is a purple rice cake, (Calamay) with Ube or purple yam. This sweet and delightful delicacy is said to be originated from this town because of its large plantations of Ube (purple yam).
  • Fried Ube bread: Another mouthwatering delicacy made of ube. It is bread deep‑fried then filled with purple yam.
  • Chocobao: a chocolate flavored pasteurized carabao milk that has a nutritional value that is a product of the Philippine Carabao Center in Barangay Lomangog.
  • Puto cheese: a special puto made from the milk of carabao.
  • Other dairy Products

Ubay-ubay Festival edit

Like the Sinulog of Cebu, the Ubay-ubay Festival is the town's own version in celebration and honor of the patron saint, Sr. Santo Niño. This colorful and fascinating festivity is a well-attended event where people flock the town's major roads and venues to view the grand street parade and the festival dance-competition. This celebration is held every last Friday of January.[36]

Government edit

 
Ubay Municipal Hall

Ubay is governed by the municipal mayor as head of the municipality. The vice mayor is the next highest position and acts as the presiding officer of the municipal council.

Infrastructure edit

Transport edit

The most common form of local transportation is the tricycle for nearer barangays. For far barangays, the motorcycle is the most common. All barangays are connected by roads and the only places without roads are the steep slopes of the central mountains.

The improvement of the Bohol circumferential road and the port facilities helped Ubay to become the trading and transportation hub of northeastern Bohol, connecting it to the neighboring island of Leyte and the rest of Bohol province. Passenger and cargo traffic to these destinations has noticeably increased over the years indicating an increasing volume of trade between these points.

Land transportation is provided by various short and long-distance buses, jeeps and vans, connecting Ubay to the rest of the towns in the province. Tagbilaran can be reached from Ubay in two to three hours by bus or van. There are also daily combined road/ferry services to Metro Manila (Pasay / Cubao, Quezon City).

Ubay seaport is considered the province's principal gateway to Leyte, and Samar.[46] Its improved port area is linked to the major port destinations of neighboring provinces such as Bato and Hilongos in Leyte, Maasin City in Southern Leyte, and Cebu City, the regional capital.[47] Four vessels travels to and from Cebu City daily,[46] and routes to and from Bato, Hilongos and Maasin City are also served daily. The journey time for each destination is 4–5 hours.[48]

Tapal Wharf is another port terminal located in northeastern barangay of Tapal that serves the President Carlos P. Garcia-Ubay and vice-versa route.[49]

 
Ubay Airport

Camambugan Airport

Ubay is home to one of only three airports in Bohol (the other Bohol–Panglao International Airport and Tagbilaran Old Airport), but Ubay Airport is currently ongoing expansion and development which is delayed by the recent pandemic. The runway currently is only about 1,000 metres (3,280 ft) long. It is proposed to be a service airport for airlines and budget airport that will connect to other provinces and tourists from other tourism destinations.

Health edit

For health services, the town has three public Rural Health Units (RHU) staffed by doctors, nurses, midwives, dentists, medical technologists and sanitary inspectors. A small government hospital was established to provide outpatient services to local residents. A private 15-bed hospital in Fatima also provides services for emergencies. A pediatrics and OB-gyne clinic complements the health services available in town. A Public Rural Health Unit (RHU) 4 and RHU 5 is being eyed to be constructed within three years period in 2023-2025.

Don Emilio Del Valle Memorial Hospital in barangay Bood is a National Government Hospital was established in 2003 from a donated lot with a current bed capacity of 300 as of 2019.[50] It became the first agency in the province to be granted with ISO 9001:2008 QMS Certification by TUV SUD. In July 2015, it was granted a certificate of full ISO compliance by TUV SUD. In 2017, it acquired its ISO 9001:2015 Certification by TÜV Rheinland.[51]

Barangay Health Workers (BHW) from each barangay provide direct health care assistance to barangay residents.

Public order and safety edit

The local police force is 37 police officers. Police–population ratio is 1:2,211, less favourable than the standard ratio of 1:1,000. The police are augmented by 492 Barangay Tanod volunteers. It is reported that crime rate in Ubay is relatively low. The local Fire Department is staffed by eight fire fighters with two fire trucks. Incidence of fires is reportedly low in the municipality.

Utilities edit

Bohol was linked to the major source of geothermal power in Leyte through the underwater connection between Maasin City, Southern Leyte and Ubay. Presently, only three of the 44 barangays have no electricity, yet only 34.97 percent of the total households in the municipality have electricity compared to the province, which was 58.3 percent energized in 2000.

The town proper and seven other barangays were served by the Ubay Water Service Cooperative. The cooperative planned to expand their service to eight other barangays in the near future. Due to consumer demand and the limited size of the supply, water service became difficult during dry months. Bohol province reported that 23.71 percent of its households had their own faucets from a community system while Ubay reported only 8.97 percent.

For the province, 21.68 percent of households had access to shared faucets while Ubay only had 8.86 percent. In Ubay, slightly more than half (51.83%) of the households had access to dug wells.

Education edit

Elementary Education edit

 
Ubay Central Elementary School at Poblacion, Ubay, Bohol, Philippines

There are 45 public elementary schools in the municipality located in each barangay and one on Tres Reyes island.[52]

Public Elementary Schools
    • Achila Elementary School
    • Bay-ang Elementary School
    • Benliw Elementary School
    • Bongbong Elementary School
    • Bood Elementary School
    • Buenavista Elementary School
    • Bulilis Elementary School
    • Cagting Elementary School
    • Calanggaman Elementary School
    • California Elementary School
    • Camambugan Elementary School
    • Casate Elementary School
    • Cuya Elementary School
    • Fatima Elementary School
    • Gabi Elementary School
    • Gov. Boyles Elementary School
    • Guintaboan Elementary School
    • Hambabauran Elementary School
    • Humayhumay Elementary School
    • Ilihan Elementary School
    • Imelda Elementary School
    • Juagdan Elementary School
    • Katarungan Elementary School
    • Lomangog Elementary School
    • Luz Elementary School (Camalian)
    • New Los Angeles Elementary School
    • Pag-asa Elementary School
    • Pangpang Elementary School
    • San Francisco Elementary School
    • San Isidro Elementary School
    • San Vicente Elementary School
    • Sentinela Elementary School
    • Sinandigan Elementary School
    • Tapal Integrated School
    • Tapon Elementary School
    • Tintinan Elementary School
    • Tipolo Elementary School
    • Tres Reyes Elementary School
    • Tubog Integrated School
    • Tuboran Elementary School
    • Ubay Central Elementary School (Poblacion)
    • Ubay II Central Elementary School (Biabas)
    • Ubay III Central Elementary School (San Pascual)
    • Union Elementary School
    • Villa Teresita Elementary School

There are 7 private pre-school and elementary schools.[53]

Private Pre-school and Elementary Schools
    • Benliw Apostolic Christian School, Inc. (Pre-school and Elementary Education)
    • Bohol Northern Star Colleges (Pre-school and Elementary Education) at Poblacion
    • Grace Multi-Level School (Pre-school) at Fatima
    • ICTHUS Christian Academy (Pre-school and Elementary Education) at Poblacion
    • Montessori Educational Learning Center of Ubay (Pre-school and Elementary Education) at Tapon
    • Sacred Heart Learning & Formation Center (Pre-school and Elementary Education) at Poblacion
    • Ubay Baptist Christian Academy (Pre-school and Elementary Education) at Fatima
    • Ubay Seventh-day Adventist Multigrade School (Pre-school and Elementary Education) at Fatima

Secondary Education edit

There are 19 public[54] and private high schools[55] in the municipality which offer junior and senior high school curriculum.[56][57]

^1 Accountancy, Business, and Management (ABM)
^2 General Academic Strand (GAS)
^3 Humanities and Social Sciences (HUMSS)
^4 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)
^5 Technical, Vocational, and Livelihood (TVL)

Tertiary Education edit

  • Bohol Northern Star Colleges - To meet the increasing demands for college education, Bohol Northeastern College was founded in 1996 by Bohol political leaders, former governors Erico B. Aumentado and David B. Tirol. The name was later changed to its present name in January 2007.[59]
  • Ubay Community College[60]

Notable personalities edit

References edit

  1. ^ a b c Agustin de la Cavada y Mendez de Vigo (1876). "9". Historia, Geografica, Geologica, y Estadistica de Filipinas Tomo I. Vol. 1. Manila: Consejo de la Hispanidad, Biblioteca. p. 259. ISBN 9781332712809.
  2. ^ "Ubay Bohol May 2022 Election Results". Rappler. 13 May 2022. Retrieved 6 November 2022.
  3. ^ Municipality of Ubay | (DILG)
  4. ^ "2015 Census of Population, Report No. 3 – Population, Land Area, and Population Density" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority. Quezon City, Philippines. August 2016. ISSN 0117-1453. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 25, 2021. Retrieved July 16, 2021.
  5. ^ a b c Census of Population (2020). "Region VII (Central Visayas)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 8 July 2021.
  6. ^ "PSA Releases the 2018 Municipal and City Level Poverty Estimates". Philippine Statistics Authority. 15 December 2021. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  7. ^ a b "Ubay Bohol Travel Guide". www.bohol-philippines.com. Retrieved 2019-05-15.
  8. ^ Kaufmann 1934.
  9. ^ a b Jes B. Tirol (March 27, 2011). "Toponyms of Bohol and its Towns Part 12. Last of Series". Bohol Chronicle. Archived from the original on April 5, 2011. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
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