Fatah Alliance

The Fatah Alliance (Arabic: ائتلاف الفتح‎, romanizediʾtilāf al-fatḥ), also sometimes translated as the Conquest Alliance, is a political coalition in Iraq formed to contest the 2018 general election. The main components are groups involved in the Popular Mobilization Forces which is mainly a state-sponsored umbrella organization made up of Iraqi Shiite Muslims who fought from 2014 to 2017 alongside the Iraqi Army to defeat ISIL. It is led by Hadi Al-Amiri, the leader of the Badr Organization.[7][8][9][10]

Fatah Alliance
LeaderHadi Al-Amiri
Founded2018
Split fromState of Law Coalition
IdeologyIraqi nationalism[1]
Shia Islamism
Big tent
Pro-Iran[2][3][4]
Anti-secularism
Anti-corruption[5]
Factions:
Anti-Americanism
Anti-Zionism
Vilayat-e Faqih
Sistanism
Islamic democracy
Pan-Islamism
Political positionRight-wing[citation needed]
ReligionShia Islam
National affiliationBuilding Alliance[6]
International affiliationAxis of Resistance
Colors     Dark green
     Marigold
Council of Representatives
48 / 329
Seats in the Governorate Councils
0 / 440
Governors
0 / 18
Election symbol
lion
Website
http://www.alfateh-iq.com/

MembersEdit

The Fatah Alliance included the Badr Organisation, the Al-Sadiqoun Bloc (the political wing of Asa'ib Ahl al-Haq, AAH), Kata'ib Hezbollah and Kata'ib al-Imam Ali, all key components of the Hashd. The Fatah Alliance agreed to run jointly with al-Abadi's Nasr al-Iraq (Victory of Iraq) list, but the agreement fell apart after only 24 hours, reportedly over Abadi's conditions.[11][12] The Badr Organisation, headed by Hadi Al-Amiri, was previously part of the ruling State of Law Coalition and announced their withdrawal from the Alliance in December 2017,[13][14] and won 22 seats.

Asa'ib Ahl al-Haq split from the Sadrist Movement in 2004.[15] It has also been one of the main Iraqi armed groups active in the Syrian Civil War.[16][17] They have received funding and training from Iran's Quds Force[18][19] and, like many Sadrists, are reported to have religious allegiance to the Iranian Grand Ayatollah Kazem al-Haeri.[20] AAH formed a political wing, called the Al-Sadiqoun Bloc, to contest the 2014 Iraqi parliamentary election, winning one seat.

Electoral resultsEdit

Iraqi ParliamentEdit

They were expected to win 37 seats in the parliament in 2018 elections, according to one opinion poll.[21]

Election year # of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Government
2018 1,366,789 (#1)
48 / 329
 

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.alfateh-iq.com/alliance
  2. ^ http://www.newsweek.com/who-moqtada-al-sadr-firebrand-cleric-who-once-fought-us-holds-balance-power-924025
  3. ^ http://www.mei.edu/content/io/iran-backed-fateh-alliance-seeks-win-or-play-kingmaker-upcoming-iraqi-elections
  4. ^ http://m.thebaghdadpost.com/en/Story/26764
  5. ^ http://aletejahtv.com/archives/227089
  6. ^ http://www.rudaw.net/english/middleeast/iraq/03092018
  7. ^ "Hashd al-Shaabi to the elections: "Alliance of the Mujahideen" ... headed by Amiri?". Al-Akhbar. 2017-11-30. Retrieved 2018-01-01.
  8. ^ "Hashd commander from Badr Organization to form new alliance for Iraqi election". Rudaw. 2 December 2017. Retrieved 2018-01-01.
  9. ^ "Alliances Announced For Iraq's 2018 Elections". musingsoniraq.blogspot.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-01-12.
  10. ^ "Abadi seeks alliance with Popular Mobilization Units based on his terms". Arab News. 2018-01-13. Retrieved 2018-01-12.
  11. ^ Arab, The New. "Iraqi militias and PM Abadi to contest general election separately". alaraby. Retrieved 2018-01-17.
  12. ^ "IRAQI PM SIGNS ELECTORAL PACT WITH SHIA-LED COALITION FOR MAY ELECTIONS". nrttv. 2018-01-14. Retrieved 2018-01-14.
  13. ^ "Hashd commander from Badr Organization to form new alliance for Iraqi election". Rudaw. 2 December 2017. Retrieved 2018-01-01.
  14. ^ "Hashd al-Shaabi to the elections: "Alliance of the Mujahideen" ... headed by Amiri?". Al-Akhbar. 2017-11-30. Retrieved 2018-01-01.
  15. ^ ""The Insurgency," Operation New Dawn, Official Website of the United States Force-Iraq". Archived from the original on 29 November 2014. Retrieved 17 November 2014.
  16. ^ Omar al-Jaffal (29 October 2013). "Iraqi Shiites join Syria war". Al-Monitor. Retrieved 25 April 2014.
  17. ^ "Iraqi Shi'ites flock to Assad's side as sectarian split widens". Reuters. 19 June 2013. Retrieved 18 September 2014.
  18. ^ Cassman, Daniel. "Asa'ib Ahl al-Haq - Mapping Militant Organizations". Retrieved 8 June 2016.
  19. ^ Controlled by Iran, the deadly militia recruiting Iraq's men to die in Syria, The Guardian, 12 March 2014
  20. ^ "Religious Allegiances among Pro-Iranian Special Groups in Iraq". Retrieved 17 November 2014.
  21. ^ Munqith Dagher, Anthony H. Cordesman (28 March 2018), "Iraqi Public Opinion on the 2018: Parliamentary Elections" (PDF), Center for Strategic and International StudiesCS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)