Stephen F. Austin High School (Austin, Texas)

Stephen F. Austin High School, more commonly known as Austin High, is a public high school in Austin, Texas, United States, and part of the Austin Independent School District (AISD). Founded in 1881, it is one of the oldest public high schools west of the Mississippi River, and was the one of the first public high schools in the state of Texas.

Stephen F. Austin High School
AustinHighSchoolAustin.JPG
Address
1715 West Cesar Chavez Street

,
United States
Coordinates30°16′26″N 97°45′59″W / 30.27389°N 97.76639°W / 30.27389; -97.76639Coordinates: 30°16′26″N 97°45′59″W / 30.27389°N 97.76639°W / 30.27389; -97.76639
Information
School typePublic, High school
MottoLoyal Forever[4]
Established1881; 139 years ago (1881)
School districtAustin Independent School District
PrincipalAmy Taylor[1]
Teaching staff133.50 (FTE) (2016–17)[2]
Grades912[2]
Enrollment2,145 (2016–17)[2]
Student to teacher ratio16.07 (2016–17)[2]
Color(s)     Maroon
     White
Athletics conferenceUIL 25-AAAAAA
MascotMr. Maroo[3]
Team nameMaroons[3]
Website
Austin Community College Rio Grande Campus, formerly Austin High School and John T. Allan Junior High School (est. 1916.)[5]

The campus is located near Downtown Austin along the Colorado River (Lady Bird Lake). The school, originally known simply as Austin High School, was renamed in 1953 after Stephen F. Austin, locally revered as the "Father of Texas".[6] It is one of eleven high schools in the Austin Independent School District.

Roughly 2,500 students attend the school in grades nine through twelve. The school's current building is its third, following four 19th-century and 20th-century locations in other buildings.[5]

Austin High's official motto is Mens Agitat Molem (Latin: The Mind Moves the Masses) or, "Mind Over Matter". The official mascot is Mr. Maroo.

The school received a level of notoriety when the film Dazed and Confused was released in 1993, loosely based on Austin High.

HistoryEdit

Austin High School opened in September 1881, with classes held on the third floor of the West Austin School building at 11th Street and Rio Grande Street. Due to population growth, instruction was held at the First Baptist Church, the temporary State Capitol, and the Smith Opera House.[5] The first Austin High School campus, located at 9th Street and Trinity Street, opened in 1900. In 1925, Austin High School moved to 1212 Rio Grande Street, the former building of John T. Allan Junior High School (est. 1916), which had relocated to 9th at Trinity.[7]

In 1956, the first seven African-American students began attending Austin High School as part of desegregation; a total of 13 black students attended white high schools in AISD at that time.[8]

In 1975, Austin High School moved to its current building, designed by Jay W. Barnes II. The first classes at the Cesar Chavez campus commenced on August 25, 1975.[7]

The Mr. Maroo mascot was officially adopted by the student council in the 1965–66 school year.

CampusEdit

The current campus is bounded by Lady Bird Lake (formerly Town Lake) on one side and a freeway on the other. Because of the school's relative isolation and the campus's relative newness, Amy Wells, author of Both Sides Now: The Story of School Desegregation’s Graduates, wrote that the school "has a somewhat suburban feel".[9]

AcademicsEdit

As of the late 1970s the school was considered to be the best in its area, according to Wells. It was known for having a university preparatory curriculum.[9]

Austin High was called a National Blue Ribbon School in 1982–83.[10]

Neighborhoods servedEdit

Downtown Austin, the Westcreek Neighborhood and the family apartment complexes of the University of Texas at Austin are zoned to Austin High School. Other Austin High neighborhoods include Zilker, Barton Hills, Travis Country, and Tarrytown.[11]

Austin High School historically had a reputation as an elite school as it was associated with wealthy neighborhoods in the western part of Austin.[12]

Student bodyEdit

As of 2000 the school was 54% non-Hispanic White, 37% Hispanic and Latino, 8% black, and 2% Asian, reflecting the overall demographics of Austin. As of 1980 most of the White students originated from west Austin, including Tarrytown. There were also middle class and poor students. Some black students originated from Clarksville, an area housing servants' quarters that, until school desegregation, was served by segregated black schools.[12] By 1980, court-ordered desegregation added a heavily Hispanic and Latino section of South Austin, and a black section of northeast Austin to the student population.[13][needs update]

As of the late 1970s the school was 66% White, 19% Hispanic, and 15% African-American, making it one of the more racially balanced AISD schools; at the time there was less Hispanic representation and more White representation than the district average. In 1980 the federal court system forced AISD to begin desegregation busing.[14]

AthleticsEdit

Austin High School offers many different athletic programs for students: football, basketball, tennis, golf, mountain biking, swimming, baseball, volleyball, soccer, track and field, cross country, lacrosse, and cheerleading. The Austin High football team won the 1942 state championship.[15]

Former NFL offensive tackle Mike Rosenthal is the head coach of the school's football team.[16]

Notable alumniEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Administration". Austin High School. Retrieved July 14, 2019 – via www.austinhighmaroons.org.
  2. ^ a b c d "Search for Public Schools - Austin H S (480894000294)". National Center for Education Statistics. Institute of Education Sciences. Retrieved July 14, 2019.
  3. ^ a b "History of AHS". Austin High School. Retrieved July 14, 2019 – via www.austinhighmaroons.org.
  4. ^ "Stephen F. Austin High School Student/Parent Handbook 2015-16" (PDF). Austin High School. p. 3. Retrieved July 14, 2019 – via www.austinhighmaroons.org.
  5. ^ a b c "Austin High School Historical Marker Text". Texas Historical Commission. Retrieved July 5, 2007.
  6. ^ Gregg Cantrell (August 1, 2001). Stephen F. Austin: Empresario of Texas. Yale University Press. p. 2. ISBN 0-300-09093-5. ...generations of Texans have come to revere Austin as the Father of Texas...
  7. ^ a b "History". Austin High School. Archived from the original on August 14, 2009. Retrieved January 12, 2009.
  8. ^ "Five Decades of Social Change: A Timeline." Austin Public Library. Retrieved on June 6, 2016.
  9. ^ a b Wells, Amy. Both Sides Now: The Story of School Desegregation’s Graduates. University of California Press, January 20, 2009. ISBN 0520942485, 9780520942486. p. 48.
  10. ^ "Blue Ribbon Schools Program, Schools Recognized 1982-1983 Through 1999-2002" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on June 30, 2014.
  11. ^ "School Assignment by Residential Address." Austin Independent School District. Retrieved on October 2, 2011.
  12. ^ a b Wells, Amy. Both Sides Now: The Story of School Desegregation’s Graduates. University of California Press, January 20, 2009. ISBN 0520942485, 9780520942486. p. 49.
  13. ^ Wells, Amy. Both Sides Now: The Story of School Desegregation’s Graduates. University of California Press, January 20, 2009. ISBN 0520942485, 9780520942486. p. 50.
  14. ^ Wells, Amy. Both Sides Now: The Story of School Desegregation’s Graduates. University of California Press, January 20, 2009. ISBN 0520942485, 9780520942486. p. 47-48.
  15. ^ Football 1942 state championship
  16. ^ Davis, Danny (December 19, 2011). "Austin High promotes Mike Rosenthal to head football coach". Austin American-Statesman. Archived from the original on June 21, 2018.
  17. ^ "SXSW Interview: Austin High School Alum Marshall Allman Discusses his New Film 'Blue Like Jazz' and the Meaning of Life • Austin Daze". April 25, 2012.
  18. ^ a b "Bush used private school option". Associated Press. April 4, 2000. Archived from the original on May 23, 2007. Retrieved August 22, 2006.
  19. ^ "The Life and Legacy of Liz Carpenter". lbjlibrary.org. Archived from the original on March 28, 2010. Retrieved March 22, 2010.
  20. ^ Michael Hoinski (July 10, 2014). "GTT". The New York Times. Retrieved January 21, 2016.
  21. ^ "Meet the 112th". 111th.illumen.org. Archived from the original on July 26, 2011. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  22. ^ a b c "Former Austin High Maroon athletes". LadyMaroons.com. Archived from the original on April 14, 2009.
  23. ^ Michael Hoinski (July 10, 2014). "GTT". The New York Times. Retrieved January 21, 2016.
  24. ^ "NFL Draft 2017: Bills move up to get record-breaking Zay Jones". Sporting News. April 28, 2017. Retrieved June 28, 2017.
  25. ^ Smith, Doug (September 23, 2012). "Austin's Lundquist to call his 26th Masters for CBS". Austin American-Statesman. Retrieved July 14, 2019.
  26. ^ Messer, Kate X (November 4, 2005). "Ben McKenzie on Uncle Robert". The Austin Chronicle. Retrieved October 22, 2008.
  27. ^ Fain, Lisa (November 28, 2006). "Homesick Texan Q&A;: Julie Powell". Homesick Texan. Retrieved July 14, 2019 – via www.homesicktexan.com.
  28. ^ Beausoleil, Sophia (June 24, 2014). "NBA father son pair host youth basketball camp". KXAN. Archived from the original on August 28, 2017.

External linksEdit