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Amarte Es Un Placer Tour

Amarte Es Un Placer Tour was a concert tour by Luis Miguel to promote his album Amarte Es Un Placer. This tour had a length of 8 months and ran through Mexico, US, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Venezuela, Brazil and Spain between 1999 and 2000. It was the highest-grossing tour ever made by a Spanish-speaking artist, as well as the most extended.[2] These two records have been broken by another tour of the same artist, the Mexico En La Piel Tour. The tour consisted of 99 concerts and was attended by approximately 1.4 million fans.[3]

Amarte Es Un Placer Tour
Tour by Luis Miguel
AEUPTourLM.jpg
Associated albumAmarte Es Un Placer
Start dateSeptember 9, 1999
End dateMay 6, 2000
Legs2
No. of shows59 in North America
17 in Europe
23 in South America
99 total
Attendance1,400,000
Box officeUS $77 million ($138.21 in 2018 dollars)[1]
Luis Miguel concert chronology

HistoryEdit

To promote Amarte Es un Placer, Luis Miguel began his Amarte Es Un Placer Tour on 9 September 1999 in Gijón, Spain.[4] In Madrid, he performed three sold-out shows,[5] and spent a month touring in Spain. His performances in Madrid, Barcelona, Sevilla, Tenerife, and Marbella were among the country's highest grossing shows of 1999.[6] Miguel then toured South America where he performed in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay, and Venezuela.[7][8] In Argentina, he drew more than 50,000 attendees per show at his three concerts in Buenos Aires,[9] and more than 101,800 spectators attended his five shows in Chile, the largest audiences of the year for an artist.[10][11] The first leg of the tour ended on 11 December 1999 in Maracaibo, Venezuela.[12] A concert was planned for the San Jose Arena in California on New Year's Eve, but was canceled because the gross income would not meet Miguel's requirements.[13]

Miguel commenced the second leg of his tour at the Centennial Garden in Bakersfield, California on 1 February 2000.[14][15] Two days later, he performed at the Universal Amphitheatre in Los Angeles, California for five consecutive nights drawing more than 24,000 spectators. In the same month, he performed four shows at Radio City Music Hall in New York City and grossed $1.4 million.[16] He also appeared in Minneapolis on 12 February and in Fairfax on 14 February.[17][18] Following his concerts at Radio City Music, Miguel performed 21 consecutive shows at the National Auditorium in Mexico City beginning on 24 February; beating the previous record of 20 set by Mexican group Timbiriche, and set the record for most attendees with an overall count of 255,000 patrons.[19] The concerts drew more than 255,000 attendees, another record for the artist.[19]

Miguel returned to touring in the United States on 24 March 2000, performed in several cities including Miami,[20] Chicago,[21] Atlantic City,[22] and Houston.[23] He later presented five shows in Monterrey, Mexico from 13 to 17 April 2000,[24][25] and after a few more performances in the US, ended the tour in San Diego on 6 May 2000.[26][27]  Miguel had the 23rd highest-grossing tour in the country with more than $15.7 million earned from his 44 shows in the US.[28] The tour was recognized by the William Morris Agency as the highest-grossing tour by a Spanish-speaking artist.[29]

 
Fireworks display during the song "Sol, Arena y Mar".

Miguel was accompanied by a 13-piece band during his tour which included horns, keyboards, guitars, and three female backup singers.[17][30] His hour-and-a-half show consisted mainly of pop songs and ballads from Amarte Es un Placer and his earlier career, as well as medleys of boleros from the Romance-themed albums.[31] During his concerts in Monterrey, he was joined by Cutberto Pérez's band Mariachi 2000 and performed live covers of Mario De Jesús Báez's "Y" and Rubén Fuentes "La Bikina".[32] The shows included a large live-screen behind the stage and featured fireworks and confetti.[17]

Critical receptionEdit

The Dallas Morning News writer Mario Tarradell found Miguel's show at the Starplex Pavilion in Dallas to be underwhelming. He panned Miguel's performance of the first bolero medley as rushed" and "erratic" and observed that the artist "spat out the lyrics, swallowed a few of them, and displayed a childlike hyperactivity in the midst of lush ballads". Tarradell also remarked that Miguel displayed a bizarre behavior during the concert such as using high notes on power ballads (which Tarradell deemed as "totally unnecessary") and was confused by Miguel's decision to do an air guitar while "Bésame Mucho" was being played.[30]

Of Miguel's performances in Los Angeles, The Orange County Register editor Daniel Chang commented that he "delivered a classy show that was as much fun to watch as it was to hear". Chang noted that Miguel "emotes a contagious energy through dramatic facial expressions, fetal-position-like contortions and physical outbursts in time with the music" and complimented his dance moves and the visual sets.[33] Regarding his concert in Houston, Michael D. Clark of the Houston Chronicle said that Miguel "proved, once again, that it isn't necessary to change languages to reach U.S. audiences". He observed that Miguel seemed "determined to balance the upbeat with the overwrought" in contrast to his previous concerts, which were dominated by ballads. Clark was disappointed that the boleros were sung in medleys which did not allow any of them to stand out.[23]

Jon Bream commented in the Star Tribune that Miguel's presentation in Minneapolis was "one of the most ambitious concert spectacles ever presented at the theater" and that the singer had a "captivating presence", but added that Miguel's music was "not particularly distinctive". He likened Miguel's uptempo songs to Earth, Wind & Fire albeit without the "rhythmic and jazzy sophistication", considered his ballads to be "conservative pop, bathed in synthesized strings with Chicago-like horn filigree," and felt let down by Miguel's choice to perform his boleros in medleys.[17]

On 24 October 2000, WEA released the Vivo live album and video from Miguel's concerts in Monterrey.[34] AllMusic editor Perry Seibert gave the video album two-out-of-five stars  and criticized its lack of subtitles, closed captions, and supplemental materials, but stated that it should not "dissuade fans of Latino music from checking out this entertaining DVD from Warner Bros".[35]

Broadcasts and recordingsEdit

 
Luis Miguel performed three sold-out shows at Velez Sarsfield Stadium gathering a total of 150,000 spectators.

Was launched a CD and DVD, titled Vivo, the CD was released in October 3, 2000, while the video album was released on October 24. It was filmed at the Auditorio Coca-Cola concert hall in Monterrey, Mexico, where Miguel performed from 13 to 17 April 2000, as part of the second leg of his tour. Vivo is the first Spanish-language live album to be released on NTSC, PAL, and DVD formats. The audio version was produced by Miguel while David Mallet directed the video album. Miguel's renditions of "Y" and "La Bikina", which he specifically performed during the concert shows in Mexico where he was joined by Cutberto Pérez's band Mariachi 2000, made available as singles for the album.

Miguel received several accolades, including a Grammy nomination for Best Latin Pop Album and a Latin Grammy nomination for Best Male Pop Vocal Album. Commercially, the album peaked at number two on the albums chart in Spain and on the Billboard Top Latin Albums chart in the United States. It also topped the albums chart in Argentina and was certified triple Platinum and Gold in Mexico.

On the first leg of the tour, in Argentina Canal 13 aired a 90-minute special with the complete show of November 5, 1999 at Velez Sarsfield Stadium, with a 50,000 sold-out.[36] Also in Chile the November 20 show at Estadio Nacional was fully recorded, for a partial 60-minute transmission a few days later by UC13.[37]

Tour Set ListEdit

Amarte Es Un Placer Tour - Leg 1: Sep/9/1999 - Dec/11/1999[38]
Amarte Es Un Placer Tour - Leg 1
Sep 9, 1999 – Dec 11, 1999
No.TitleOriginal albumLength
1."Intro"  
2."Quiero"Amarte Es Un Placer 
3."Tú, Solo Tú"Amarte Es Un Placer 
4."J.C. Calderón" (Entrégate / Tengo Todo Excepto a Ti / La Incondicional)20 Años, Busca Una Mujer 
5."Up-tempo Medley" (Un Hombre Busca Una Mujer / Cuestión De Piel / Oro De Ley)Busca Una Mujer, 20 Años 
6."Romance" (No Me Platiques Más / No Sé Tú / La Puerta / La Barca / Inolvidable)Romance 
7."Suave"Aries 
8."Dame"Nada Es Igual 
9."Interlude [Armonica]"  
10."Dormir Contigo (Only in selected dates in South America)"Amarte Es Un Placer 
11."Segundo Romance" (El Día Que Me Quieras / Solamente Una Vez / Somos Novios / Todo Y Nada / Nosotros)Segundo Romance 
12."O Tú o Ninguna"Amarte Es Un Placer 
13."Sol, Arena y Mar"Amarte Es Un Placer 
14."Romances" (Voy A Apagar La Luz / Contigo Aprendi / Por Debajo de la Mesa / El Reloj / Sabor a Mí / La Gloria Eres Tú / Bésame Mucho)Romances 
15."Cómo Es Posible Que a Mi Lado"Nada Es Igual 
16."Será Que No Me Amas"20 Años 
17."Te Propongo Esta Noche"Amarte Es Un Placer 
Amarte Es Un Placer Tour - Leg 2: Feb/1/2000 - May/6/2000[39][40]
Amarte Es Un Placer Tour - Leg 2
Feb 1, 2000 – May 6, 2000
No.TitleOriginal albumLength
1."Intro"  
2."Quiero"Amarte Es Un Placer 
3."Tú, Solo Tú"Amarte Es Un Placer 
4."J.C. Calderón" (Entrégate / Tengo Todo Excepto A Ti / La Incondicional)20 Años, Busca Una Mujer 
5."Up-tempo Medley" (Un Hombre Busca Una Mujer / Cuestión De Piel / Oro De Ley)Busca Una Mujer, 20 Años 
6."Romance" (No Me Platiques Más / No Sé Tú / La Puerta / La Barca / Inolvidable)Romance 
7."Suave"Aries 
8."Interlude [Armonica]"  
9."Segundo Romance" (El Día Que Me Quieras / Solamente Una Vez / Somos Novios / Todo Y Nada / Nosotros)Segundo Romance 
10."O Tú, O Ninguna"Amarte Es Un Placer 
11."Sol, Arena Y Mar"Amarte Es Un Placer 
12."Romances" (Voy A Apagar La Luz / Contigo Aprendi / Por Debajo De La Mesa / El Reloj / Sabor A Mi / La Gloria Eres Tú / Bésame Mucho)Romances 
13."Y (Only in Mexico)"never released by the artist 
14."La Bikina (Only in Mexico)"never released by the artist 
15."Cómo Es Posible Que A Mi Lado"Nada Es Igual 
16."Será Que No Me Amas"20 Años 
17."Te Propongo Esta Noche"Amarte Es Un Placer 

Tour datesEdit

List of concerts, showing date, city, country, venue, tickets sold, amount of available tickets, and gross revenue[41]
Date City Country Venue Attendance Revenue
Europe - Leg 1
September 9, 1999 Gijón Spain Palacio de Deportes de Gijón[4] N/A N/A
September 11, 1999 Pamplona Plaza de Toros de Pamplona[42]
September 15, 1999 Madrid Plaza de Toros Las Ventas[43]
September 16, 1999
September 17, 1999
September 20, 1999 Vigo Auditorio de Castrelos
September 22, 1999 Valladolid Estadio José Zorrilla
September 25, 1999 Marbella Estadio Municipal de Marbella
September 26, 1999 Cartagena Estadio Cartagonova
October 1, 1999 Valencia Plaza de Toros de Valencia
October 2, 1999
October 5, 1999 Barcelona Palau Sant Jordi
October 6, 1999
October 9, 1999[a] Seville Estadio Olímpico de la Cartuja[44][45]
October 11, 1999 Zaragoza Pabellón Príncipe Felipe
October 12, 1999
October 16, 1999 Tenerife Recinto Portuario
South America
October 28, 1999 São Paulo Brazil Credicard Hall N/A N/A
October 29, 1999
October 30, 1999
November 1, 1999 Rio de Janeiro Arena Metropolitan
November 2, 1999
November 5, 1999[b] Buenos Aires Argentina Estadio Vélez Sarsfield[46]
November 6, 1999
November 7, 1999
November 10, 1999 Rosario Estadio Rosario Central[47]
November 12, 1999 Córdoba Estadio Chateau Carrera
November 14, 1999 Salta Estadio El Gigante del Norte
November 16, 1999 Mendoza Estadio Malvinas Argentinas
November 18, 1999 San Juan Estadio 27 de Septiembre
November 20, 1999[c] Santiago Chile Estadio Nacional
November 21, 1999 Viña del Mar Anfiteatro de la Quinta Vergara
November 22, 1999[d] Santiago Estadio San Carlos de Apoquindo
November 24, 1999 Antofagasta Estadio Regional de Antofagasta
November 27, 1999 Temuco Estadio Municipal Germán Becker
December 1, 1999 Quilmes Argentina Estadio Quilmes
December 3, 1999 Montevideo Uruguay Estadio Centenario
December 8, 1999 Caracas Venezuela Poliedro de Caracas[48][49]
December 9, 1999
December 11, 1999 Maracaibo Plaza Monumental
North America - Leg 2[50]
February 1, 2000 Bakersfield United States Centennial Garden 3,477 / 4,411 $107,560
February 3, 2000 Los Angeles Universal Amphitheater 24,012 / 27,416 $1,580,042
February 4, 2000
February 5, 2000
February 6, 2000
February 7, 2000
February 12, 2000 Minneapolis Orpheum Theatre 1,770 / 2,161 $113,660
February 14, 2000 Fairfax Patriot Center 3,173 / 5,823 $122,550
February 16, 2000 New York City Radio City Music Hall 18,947 / 24,052 $1,367,140
February 17, 2000
February 18, 2000
February 19, 2000
February 24, 2000 Mexico City Mexico National Auditorium 183,688 / 203,343 $8,340,209
February 25, 2000
February 26, 2000
February 27, 2000
March 1, 2000
March 2, 2000
March 3, 2000
March 4, 2000
March 5, 2000
March 6, 2000
March 8, 2000
March 9, 2000
March 10, 2000
March 11, 2000
March 12, 2000
March 15, 2000
March 16, 2000
March 17, 2000
March 18, 2000
March 19, 2000
March 20, 2000
March 24, 2000 Miami United States American Airlines Arena 18,849 / 20,000 $1,177,437
March 25, 2000
March 26, 2000 Lakeland Jenkins Arena 2,269 / 2,269 $128,526
March 28, 2000 Chicago United Center 7,328 / 10,000 $550,075
March 31, 2000 Lowell Tsongas Arena 4,175 / 6,161 $214,480
April 1, 2000 Atlantic City Mark G. Etess Arena N/A N/A
April 5, 2000 South Padre Island SP Convention Center
April 6, 2000
April 7, 2000 San Antonio Alamodome 9,539 / 15,000 $577,486
April 10, 2000 Houston Compaq Center 9,241 / 10,843 $571,885
April 13, 2000[e] Monterrey Mexico Auditorio Coca-Cola 56,754 / 75,000 $1,954,548
April 14, 2000
April 15, 2000
April 16, 2000
April 17, 2000
April 19, 2000 Dallas United States Starplex Amphitheatre 4,369 / 5,200 $298,264
April 21, 2000 El Paso Don Haskins Center 11,352 / 18,000 $740,411
April 22, 2000
April 25, 2000[f] Denver Magness Arena 2,561 / 5,000 $149,985
April 27, 2000 Anaheim Arrowhead Pond 8,760 / 10,352 $385,520
April 28, 2000 San Jose San Jose Arena 6,264 / 11,647 $450,245
April 29, 2000 Las Vegas Mandalay Bay Events Center 5,779 / 7,988 $474,410
May 2, 2000 Tucson TCC Arena 3,011 / 6,000 $219,248
May 3, 2000 Phoenix Desert Sky Pavilion 10,944 / 19,634 $142,984
May 5, 2000[g] San Diego Cox Arena 8,398 / 8,398 $541,656
May 6, 2000 Chula Vista Coors Amphitheatre 6,613 / 10,000 $407,047
Total 411,273 / 508,698 (80,8%) $20,615,368

Cancelled showsEdit

List of cancelled concerts, showing date, city, country, venue, and reason for cancellation
Date City Country Venue Reason
October 29, 1999 San Bernardino Paraguay Anfiteatro José Asunción Flores Logistical Problems[53]
December 9, 1999 Valencia Venezuela Forum de Valencia Stage Problems[54]
April 30, 2000 Fresno United States Selland Arena Unknown[55]

Tour personnelEdit

Personnel adapted from Allmusic and as per Vivo DVD end credits.[56][57]

Performance creditsEdit

Technical creditsEdit

  • Chris Littleton - Tour Manager
  • Marco Gamboa - Programming and Sequence
  • Roberto Ruiz - Road Manager Band
  • Steve "Chopper" Borges - Production Manager
  • Randy "RT" Townsend - Stage Manager
  • Dave Howard - Tour Counter
  • Edith Sánchez - LM Wardrobe
  • Abigail Potter - Tour Manager Assistant
  • Suzanne Graham - Wardrobe and Catering
  • Joe Madera - Security Boss
  • Jim Yakabuski - Room Engineer
  • Mike Jones - LM Monitors
  • Carlos Duarte - Band Monitors
  • Fabián Boggino - Lights Director
  • Pat Brannon - Light Crew Boss
  • Connie Paulson - High End Technical
  • Greg Walker - Dimmer Technical
  • Kurt Springer - V-Dosc Crew Boss
  • Fumi Okazaki - Sound
  • Son Nishimura - Sound
  • Toshio Kumagai - Sound
  • Mick Anger - Video Director
  • Michael Caron - Video Crew Boss
  • Jim Smyk - Video Engineer
  • Phil Evans - Led Screen Technical
  • Sam Herrington - Carpenter Boss
  • Richard Brisson - Pyrotechnic

NotesEdit

  1. ^ The October 9, 1999 concert at Estadio Olímpico de la Cartuja in Seville was originally scheduled to take place on September 24, 1999, but was postponed due to "logistical problems".
  2. ^ The November 5 show in Buenos Aires was fully recorded for its transmission in Argentina by Canal 13
  3. ^ The November 20 show in Santiago was fully recorded for its partial transmission in Chile by UC13
  4. ^ Gala show for 2,500 people[11]
  5. ^ The shows of April 13, 14, 15, 16 and 17 in Monterrey was recorded and later released in a DVD as Vivo
  6. ^ The April 25, 2000 concert at Magness Arena in Denver was originally scheduled to take place on February 9, 2000, but was cancelled and postponed due to "family problems".[51]
  7. ^ The May 5, 2000 concert at Cox Arena in San Diego was originally scheduled to take place on January 28, 2000, but was postponed due to "logistical problems".[52]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Retrieved January 2, 2019.
  2. ^ "Luis Miguel Biografía". luismigueloficial.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  3. ^ "Luis Miguel: Friday, Sept. 14, 8:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. -". Las Vegas Sun. 29 June 2018. Archived from the original on 14 September 2018. Retrieved 27 October 2018.
  4. ^ a b "Luis Miguel inicia en Gijón la gira de su disco 'Amarte es un placer'". El País (in Spanish). 10 September 1999. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  5. ^ Lewellyn, Howell (2 October 1999). "Miguel Proudly Sticks To Spanish On 'Amarte' From WMI". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 111 (40): 24. Retrieved 10 August 2011.
  6. ^ García, Manuel Cuadrado; Contrí, Gloria Berenguer (1999). El consumo de servicios culturales (in Spanish). ESIC Editorial. p. 99. ISBN 978-84-7356-302-4.
  7. ^ "Biografía de Luis Miguel". Terra Networks (in Spanish). Telefónica. 5 October 2010. Archived from the original on 10 March 2017. Retrieved 19 April 2011.
  8. ^ "A solas con Luis Miguel". Clarín (in Spanish). 19 September 1999. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  9. ^ "El huracán Luismi incluyó un encuentro con Zulemita". Página/12 (in Spanish). Editorial La Página. 6 November 1999. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  10. ^ "Chilean Locals, Colombian Giveaways & Argentine Expansion". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 112 (8): LM-6. 19 February 2000. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  11. ^ a b "Luismi suena fuerte". La Nación. 30 November 1999. Retrieved 14 May 2019.
  12. ^ "Tour Dates". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media: 1. 28 August 1999. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  13. ^ Slambrouck, Paul Van (20 December 1999). "This New Year's Eve, many won't party like it's 1999". Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  14. ^ Burr, Ramiro (16 January 2000). "Luis Miguel, Anthony U.S.-bound". San Antonio Express-News. Hearst Corporation.
  15. ^ Navarro, Juan Manuel (30 January 2000). "Propone evolucionar". Gente (in Spanish).
  16. ^ Lannert, John (18 March 2000). "Ricky, Micky Top of Office". Billboard. Nielsen Business media. 112 (12): 46. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  17. ^ a b c d Bream, Jon (13 February 2000). "Luis Miguel's steamy ballads, indoor fireworks heat up the Orpheum". Star Tribune. Archived from the original on 12 March 2017. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  18. ^ "Plan Ahead". The Washington Post. Nash Holdings. 14 January 2000. Archived from the original on 12 March 2017. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  19. ^ a b "Luis Miguel tras récord". La Nación (in Spanish). Grupo Nación. 18 March 2000. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  20. ^ Niurka, Norma (28 March 2000). "La Voz y El Estilo de Luis Miguel Complacen a sus Devotos Admiradores". El Nuevo Herald (in Spanish). The McClatchy Company.
  21. ^ Emerick, Laura (30 March 2000). "Luis Miguel at the United Center". Chicago Sun-Times. Sun-Times Media Group. Archived from the original on 12 March 2017. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  22. ^ "It's No Joke, There's a Ton of Headliners This Week". The Press of Atlantic City. Abarta. 31 March 2000.
  23. ^ a b Clark, Michael D. (12 April 2000). "Luis Miguel branches out for avid fans". Houston Chronicle. Hearst Corporation.
  24. ^ "Premian a Luis Miguel por récord de conciertos". El Universal (in Spanish). 21 March 2000. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  25. ^ Lannert, John (22 April 2000). "Top Acts Set For Latin Awards Show". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 112 (17): 49. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  26. ^ "Boxscore Top 10 Concert Grosses". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 112 (22): 18. 27 May 2000. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved 10 March 2017.
  27. ^ Lannert, John (4 March 2000). "WEA Latina Stars Hit Road". Billboard. 112 (10): 59. Retrieved 10 March 2017.
  28. ^ Cobo, Leila (30 December 2000). "Latin Sales Show Slow, Steady Rise". Billboard. Nielsen Media Business. 112 (53): 56. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved 10 March 2017.
  29. ^ Candelaria, Cordelia (2004). Candelaria, Cordelia; García, Peter J.; Aldama, Arturo J. (eds.). Encyclopedia of Latino Popular Culture in the United States. 2. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. p. 552. ISBN 978-0-313-32215-0.
  30. ^ a b Tarradell, Mario (20 April 2000). "Unlucky in Love – Fan might have caught Luis Miguel on bad night". The Dallas Morning News. A. H. Belo Corporation. Retrieved 10 March 2017.
  31. ^ Carbrera, Cloe (28 March 2000). "Ballad king stirs up fan frenzy". The Tampa Tribune. Tampa Media Group.
  32. ^ "Luis Miguel se presenta Vivo". El Informador (in Spanish). 17 September 2000. p. 11-D.
  33. ^ Chang, Daniel (6 February 2000). "Review: The singer delivers an entertaining mix of good music and spectacle". The Orange County Register. Digital First Media.
  34. ^ "Luis Miguel más Vivo que nunca". La Opinión (in Spanish). ImpreMedia. 28 September 2000.
  35. ^ Seibert, Peter. "Vivo [Video/DVD] – Luis Miguel". AllMusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 10 March 2017.
  36. ^ Luis Miguel Concierto En Argentina 1999 on YouTube
  37. ^ Luis Miguel Tour Vivo Chile 1999 on YouTube
  38. ^ "Setlist Leg 1". Setlist.fm. Retrieved 12 May 2019.
  39. ^ Miguel, Luis (2000). Vivo (DVD). WEA International. back cover. 857384574-2.
  40. ^ "Setlist Leg 2". Setlist.fm. Retrieved 7 May 2019.
  41. ^ "Tour dates". lacasadeluismiguel.com. 18 October 2000. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  42. ^ "El cantante mexicano Luis Miguel reúne a 6.000 personas en su concierto de Pamplona". El País (in Spanish). 13 September 1999. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  43. ^ "Luis Miguel, a la primera fue la vencida". ABC (in Spanish). 16 September 1999. p. 85. Retrieved 8 May 2019.
  44. ^ "Luis Miguel actúa en el estadio de La Cartuja ante 25.000 personas". El País (in Spanish). 9 October 1999. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  45. ^ "Un bolero olímpico". El Correo de Andalucía (in Spanish). 8 October 1999. p. 39. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  46. ^ "El romance multitudinario". La Nación (in Spanish). 7 November 1999. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  47. ^ "Hubo heridos y detenidos en un recital de Luis Miguel". La Nación (in Spanish). 12 November 1999. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  48. ^ "Luis Miguel reaparece con éxito en Venezuela". El Siglo de Torreón (in Spanish). Editora de la Laguna. 9 December 1999. p. 45. Retrieved 29 May 2019.
  49. ^ "Luis Miguel '99: Amarte es un placer". Venevisión (in Spanish). 11 December 1999. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  50. ^ North American boxscore data:
  51. ^ Denver show was postponed
  52. ^ San Diego show was postponed
  53. ^ "Cancela Luis Miguel su concierto en Paraguay". El Universal (in Spanish). 24 October 1999. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  54. ^ "Luis Miguel suspende concierto en Venezuela". El Siglo de Torreón (in Spanish). Editora de la Laguna. 19 November 1999. p. 49. Retrieved 29 May 2019.
  55. ^ Fresno show cancelled
  56. ^ Miguel, Luis (2000). Vivo (DVD). WEA International. end credits. 857384574-2.
  57. ^ "Vivo — Credits". AllMusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 7 May 2019.

External linksEdit