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Albert Portas Soy (Catalan: [əlˈβɛɾ ˈpɔɾtəs ˈsɔj], Spanish: [alˈβeɾ ˈpoɾtas ˈsoi]; born 15 November 1973) is a Spanish former professional tennis player.

Albert Portas
Albert Portas US Open.jpg
Country (sports) Spain
ResidenceBarcelona, Spain
Born (1973-11-15) 15 November 1973 (age 46)
Barcelona, Spain
Height1.88 m (6 ft 2 in)
Turned pro1994
Retired2007
PlaysRight-handed (2-handed backhand)
Prize money$2,972,441
Singles
Career record142–198
Career titles1
Highest rankingNo. 19 (1 October 2001)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open2R (2000, 2002)
French Open3R (1997, 2000, 2002)
Wimbledon3R (2000)
US Open3R (2001)
Doubles
Career record73–109
Career titles1
Highest rankingNo. 56 (14 April 2003)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian OpenQF (2003)
French Open2R (2001, 2002, 2006)
Wimbledon1R (2000, 2001, 2003, 2006)
US Open1R (1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003)

CareerEdit

Portas turned professional in 1994. He reached his career-high singles ranking of World No. 19 in October 2001.

His only top-level singles title came at the 2001 Hamburg Masters, a tournament in which his mastery of the drop shot (key to his defeat of Juan Carlos Ferrero in the final) earned him the nickname "Drop Shot Dragon". According to the BBC, Lleyton Hewitt said of Portas that "He sure hits a lot of drop shots, but he hits them so well, as well as anyone I have faced.".[1] It is also very remarkable his final at Barcelona Open in 1997. En route to the final he defeated Gustavo Kuerten (eventual champion this same year of French Open), Marcelo Rios, and Carlos Moya but lost in the final to Albert Costa. In 1999, Portas lost the final of San Marino defeated by his countryman Galo Blanco.

He coached WTA player Daniela Hantuchová from November 2008 to February 2009.[2]

ATP career finals: 8 (2–6)Edit

Singles: 4 (1–3)Edit

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
ATP World Tour Finals (0–0)
ATP World Tour Masters 1000 (1–0)
ATP World Tour 500 Series (0–1)
ATP World Tour 250 Series (0–2)
Titles by Surface
Hard (0–0)
Clay (1–3)
Grass (0–0)
Carpet (0–0)
Titles by surface
Outdoors (1–3)
Indoors (0–0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Runner-up 1. 21 April 1997 Barcelona, Spain Clay   Albert Costa 5–7, 4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 2. 15 August 1999 San Marino, San Marino Clay   Galo Blanco 6–4, 4–6, 3–6
Winner 1. 20 May 2001 Hamburg, Germany Clay   Juan Carlos Ferrero 4–6, 6–2, 0–6, 7–6(7–5), 7–5
Runner-up 3. 29 July 2001 Sopot, Poland Clay   Tommy Robredo 6–1, 5–7, 6–7(2–7)

Doubles: 4 (1–3)Edit

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
ATP World Tour Finals (0–0)
ATP World Tour Masters 1000 (0–0)
ATP World Tour 500 Series (0–0)
ATP World Tour 250 Series (1–3)
Titles by Surface
Hard (0–0)
Clay (1–3)
Grass (0–0)
Carpet (0–0)
Titles by surface
Outdoors (1–3)
Indoors (0–0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponent Score
Runner-up 1. 10 November 1996 Santiago, Chile Clay   Dinu Pescariu   Gustavo Kuerten
  Fernando Meligeni
4–6, 2–6
Winner 1. 23 July 2000 Umag, Croatia Clay   Álex López Morón   Ivan Ljubičić
  Lovro Zovko
6–1, 7–6(7–2)
Runner-up 2. 21 July 2002 Umag, Croatia Clay   Fernando Vicente   František Čermák
  Julian Knowle
4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 3. 30 July 2006 Umag, Croatia Clay   Guillermo García-López   Jaroslav Levinský
  David Škoch
4–6, 4–6

Singles performance timelineEdit

Tournament 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Career
WR
Career
Win-Loss
Australian Open A A A A A 1R 1R 2R 1R 2R 1R 1R A A A 0 / 7 2-7
French Open A A LQ LQ 3R 1R 2R 3R 1R 3R 2R 1R LQ 1R LQ 0 / 9 8-9
Wimbledon A LQ A A A 1R 1R 3R 1R 1R 1R A A 1R LQ 0 / 7 2-7
U.S. Open A A A A 1R A 1R 1R 3R 1R 1R A A LQ A 0 / 6 2-6
Grand Slam Win Ratio 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 2 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 2 0 / 0 0 / 2 0 / 0 0 / 29 N/A
Grand Slam Win-Loss 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 2-2 0-3 1-4 5-4 2-4 3-4 1-4 0-2 0-0 0-2 0-0 N/A 14-29
Indian Wells A A A A A 1R A A A 1R A A A A A 0 / 2 0-2
Miami A A A A A A A A 1R 3R A A A A A 0 / 2 1-2
Monte Carlo A A 2R A A 1R A 1R 2R 1R 2R 1R A LQ 1R 0 / 8 3-8
Rome A A A A 2R 1R 1R 1R 2R 1R 1R LQ A A A 0 / 7 2-7
Hamburg A A A A A 1R A LQ W 1R A 2R A LQ A 1 / 4 7-3
Canada A A A A A A A A 1R A A A A A A 0 / 1 0-1
Cincinnati A A A A A A A A 1R A A A A A A 0 / 1 0-1
Stuttgart/Madrid A A A A 1R A A A 1R A A A A A A 0 / 2 0-2
Paris A A A A 1R A A A 2R A A A A A A 0 / 2 1-2
ATP World Tour Finals A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A 0 / 0 0-0
ATP Tournaments Played 1 0 3 4 17 24 18 23 29 23 20 16 6 12 3 N/A 199
ATP Finals Reached 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 N/A 4
ATP Tournaments Won 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 N/A 1
Year End Ranking 392 269 119 182 35 84 90 51 20 88 85 175 119 140 338 N/A N/A

LQ = lost in the qualifiers WR = Win Ratio, the ratio of tournaments won to those played A = Did not play in tournament

Wins over top 10 playersEdit

Season 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Total
Wins 3 0 0 1 4 0 2 10
# Player Rank Event Surface Rd Score
1997
1.   Marcelo Ríos 9 Barcelona, Spain Clay 2R 7–5, 7–6(7–3)
2.   Carlos Moyá 9 French Open, Paris, France Clay 2R 6–4, 4–6, 7–5, 6–3
3.   Thomas Muster 4 Stuttgart, Germany Clay 2R 6–4, 7–5
2000
4.   Gustavo Kuerten 5 Australian Open, Melbourne, Australia Hard 1R 4–6, 4–6, 6–4, 7–6(8–6), 6–4
2001
5.   Magnus Norman 5 Barcelona, Spain Clay 2R 1–1, ret.
6.   Magnus Norman 6 Hamburg, Germany Clay 2R 7–6(7–5), 7–6(9–7)
7.   Lleyton Hewitt 7 Hamburg, Germany Clay SF 3–6, 7–5, 6–2
8.   Juan Carlos Ferrero 9 Hamburg, Germany Clay F 3–6, 6–2, 0–6, 7–6(7–5), 7–5
2003
9.   Andy Roddick 6 Monte Carlo, Monaco Clay 1R 7–6(7–5), 6–3
10.   Carlos Moyá 4 Sopot, Poland Clay 1R 7–6(7–4), 6–7(6–8), 6–4

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Hewitt flops against qualifier". BBC News. 19 May 2001. Retrieved 7 December 2011.
  2. ^ "Brisbane International 2009: Day 2". Retrieved 7 December 2011.

External linksEdit