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In Greek mythology, Aeolus[1] (/ˈləs/; Ancient Greek: Αἴολος Aiolos [a͜ɪ́olos], Modern Greek: [ˈe.o.los] (About this sound listen) "quick-moving, nimble") was the ruler of Aeolia (later called Thessaly) and held to be the founder of the Aeolic branch of the Greek nation.

MythologyEdit

Aeolus was the son of Hellen and the nymph Orseis, and a brother of Dorus, Xuthus and, in some sources, of Amphictyon (who is otherwise a brother of Hellen).[2] He married Enarete, daughter of Deimachus (otherwise unknown). Aeolus and Enarete had many children, although the precise number and identities of these children vary from author to author in the ancient sources.[3]

The great extent of country which this race occupied, and the desire of each part of it to trace its origin to some descendant of Aeolus, probably gave rise to the varying accounts about the number of his children. Some scholars contend that the most ancient and genuine story told of only four sons of Aeolus: Sisyphus, Athamas, Cretheus, and Salmoneus, as the representatives of the four main branches of the Aeolic race.[4] Other sons included Deioneus, Perieres, Cercaphas and perhaps Magnes (usually regarded as a brother of Macedon) and Aethlius. Another son is named Mimas, who provides a link to the third Aeolus in a genealogy that seems very contrived. Calyce, Peisidice, Perimede and Alcyone were counted among the daughters of Aeolus and Enarete.[5]

This Aeolus also had an illegitimate daughter named Arne, begotten on Melanippe, daughter of the Centaur Chiron. This Arne became the mother of the second Aeolus, by the god Poseidon.

Genealogy of HellenesEdit

Genealogy of Hellenes
 
Prometheus
 
Clymene
 
Epimetheus
 
Pandora
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Deucalion
 
Pyrrha
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hellen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dorus
 
Xuthus
 
Aeolus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Achaeus
 
Ion

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Chaucer's Eolus (de Weever, Jacqueline (1996). Chaucer Name Dictionary, s.v. "Eolus". (Garland Publishing) Retrieved on 2009-10-06
  2. ^ Smith, William. "Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology". The Ancient Library. Archived from the original on October 12, 2012. Retrieved March 14, 2013. 
  3. ^ Bibliotheca i. 7. §3; Scholium on Pindar's Pythian Ode iv. 190. In the Hesiodic Catalogue of Women (fr. 10(a)), his children are: Cretheus, Athamas, Sisyphus, Salmoneus, Deioneus, Perieres, Peisidice, Alcyone, Calyce, Canace and Perimede; one other son's name, perhaps Magnes, is lost in a lacuna.
  4. ^ Schmitz, Leonhard (1864), "Aeolus (1), (2) and (3)", in Smith, William, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, 1, p. 35 
  5. ^ Apollodorus i. 7. ~ 3)