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In Greek mythology, Xuthus (/ˈzθəs/ or /ˈzjθəs/; Ancient Greek: Ξοῦθος Xouthos) was a king of Peloponnesus and founder (through his sons) of the Achaean and Ionian nations.

Contents

EtymologyEdit

According to the author, Robert Graves, Xuthus name came from the word strouthos, "sparrow". More likely, the name is a variation of Xanthus, which can signify that Xuthus was "yellow-haired". Alternatively, a colour xouthos according to Liddell and Scott as "between xanthos and pyrros" (i.e. between yellow and red), which means "tawny", "dusky". This can suggest that his name can refer to either to his skin, his complexion, his hair - or all three characteristics.[1]

FamilyEdit

Xuthus was a son of Hellen and Orseis and brother of Dorus and Aeolus. He had two sons by Creusa (daughter of Erechtheus): Ion and Achaeus[2] and a daughter named Diomede. Aiclus and Cothus are sometimes described as being his children. Euripides's play, Ion, provides an unusual alternate version, according to which Xuthus is son of Aeolus and Cyane and Ion has in fact been begotten on Xuthus's wife Creusa by Apollo. Xuthus and Creusa visited the Oracle at Delphi to ask the god if they could hope for a child. Xuthus will later father Dorus with Creusa, though Dorus is normally presented as Xuthus's brother.[3]

MythologyEdit

According to the Hesiodic Catalogue of Women on the origin of the Greeks, Hellen's three sons Dorus, Xuthus (with his sons Ion and Achaeus) and Aeolus, comprised the set of progenitors of the major ancient tribes that formed the Greek nation.[4]

Genealogy of HellenesEdit

Genealogy of Hellenes
 
Prometheus
 
Clymene
 
Epimetheus
 
Pandora
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Deucalion
 
Pyrrha
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hellen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dorus
 
Xuthus
 
Aeolus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Achaeus
 
Ion

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Xuthus". Mythology Names. 
  2. ^ Euripides. Ion, 63; compare: Pseudo-Apollodorus. Bibliotheca, Book 1.7.3
  3. ^ Euripides. Ion, 63
  4. ^ Hesiod, Catalogue frr. 9, 10(a).

SourcesEdit