Open main menu

The 2019 World Snooker Championship (also referred to as the 2019 Betfred World Snooker Championship for the purposes of sponsorship) was a professional snooker tournament that took place from 20 April to 6 May 2019 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England. It was the 43rd consecutive year that the World Snooker Championship had been held at the Crucible, and the twentieth and final ranking event of the 2018/2019 season. Qualifying for the tournament took place from 10 to 17 April 2019 at the English Institute of Sport in Sheffield.

Betfred
World Snooker Championship
World Snooker Championship 2015 Logo.png
Tournament information
Dates20 April – 6 May 2019
VenueCrucible Theatre
CitySheffield
CountryEngland
Organisation(s)WPBSA
FormatRanking event
Total prize fund£2,231,000
Winner's share£500,000
Highest break John Higgins (SCO) (143)
Final
Champion Judd Trump (ENG)
Runner-up John Higgins (SCO)
Score18–9
2018
2020

The title was won by Judd Trump, who defeated John Higgins 18–9 in the final; Trump became the eleventh player to win all three Triple Crown titles at least once. Defending champion Mark Williams lost 9–13 to David Gilbert in the second round of the tournament. For the first time in the history of the world championship, an amateur player appeared at the main stage of the event. Debutant James Cahill defeated world number one Ronnie O'Sullivan in the first round, before being narrowly defeated by Stephen Maguire in a second round decider.

The tournament saw 100 century breaks, the most recorded at any official snooker event. The highest break, a 143, was made by Higgins in his semi-final win over Gilbert.

Contents

BackgroundEdit

The World Snooker Championship is an annual cue sport tournament and the official world championship of the game of snooker.[1] Founded in the late 19th century by British Army soldiers stationed in India,[2] the sport was played originally in the United Kingdom.[3] In modern times, however, it has been played worldwide, especially in East and Southeast Asian nations such as China, Hong Kong and Thailand.[4]

The world championship sees 32 professional and qualified amateur players compete in one-on-one snooker matches in a single elimination format, each played over several frames. The event's 32 players are selected through a mix of the world snooker rankings, and a pre-tournament qualification round.[5][6] The first world championship in 1927 was won by Joe Davis, the final being held in Camkin's Hall, Birmingham, England.[7][8] Since 1977, the event has been held in the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England.[9]

Stephen Hendry is the most successful player in the modern era, having won the championship seven times.[10] The previous year's championship was won by Wales' Mark Williams, who won the event defeating Scotland's John Higgins in the final 18–16.[11][12] This was Williams' third championship, having won previously in 2000 and 2003. The winner of the 2019 event earned prize money of £500,000, from a total pool of £2,231,000.[13]

FormatEdit

The 2019 World Snooker Championship was held between 20 April and 6 May 2019 in Sheffield, England. The tournament was the last of twenty rankings events in the 2018/2019 season on the World Snooker Tour. It featured a 32-player main draw played at the Crucible Theatre, as well as a 128-player qualifying draw which took place at the English Institute of Sport from 10 to 17 April 2019, finishing three days before the start of the main draw. This was the 43rd consecutive year that the tournament was held at the Crucible, and the 51st consecutive year the championship was contested through the modern knockout format.[5][6]

The top 16 players in the latest world rankings automatically qualified for the main draw as seeded players.[a] Defending champion Mark Williams was automatically seeded first overall. The remaining fifteen seeds were allocated based on the latest world rankings (revision 10), which were released following the China Open, the penultimate event of the season. Matches in the first round of the main draw were played as best of 19 frames. The number of frames needed to win a match increased with each successive round, leading up to the final match which was played as best of 35 frames.[5][6]

All 16 non-seeded spots in the main draw were filled with players from the qualifying rounds. The qualifying draw consisted of 128 players, including 106 of the remaining 112 players on the World Snooker Tour, as well as twenty-two wildcard places allotted to non-tour players. These invited players included the women's world champion, the European junior champion, and all four semi-finalists at the amateur championship. As with the main draw, half of the participants in the qualifying draw were seeded players. Players ranked from 17th to 80th were allocated one of 64 seeds in order of their ranking, while the other participants were placed randomly into the draw. To reach the main draw at the Crucible, players needed to win three best of 19 frame matches.[14][5]

Participant summaryEdit

Eight former world champions participated in the main tournament at the Crucible. They were Ronnie O'Sullivan (five titles: 2001, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2013), John Higgins (four titles: 1998, 2007, 2009, 2011), Mark Selby (three titles: 2014, 2016, 2017), Mark Williams (three titles and defending champion: 2000, 2003, 2018), Shaun Murphy (one title: 2005), Graeme Dott (one title: 2006), Neil Robertson (one title: 2010), and Stuart Bingham (one title: 2015).[5] This was O'Sullivan's 27th consecutive appearance in the final stages of the World Championship since his debut in 1993, equalling Stephen Hendry's 27 consecutive appearances, and three short of Steve Davis's record of 30 total appearances. Four other former world championship finalists also competed: Ali Carter (twice: 2008 and 2012), Judd Trump (once: 2011), Barry Hawkins (once: 2013), and Ding Junhui (once: 2016).[14][5] The youngest player to participate in the main stage of the tournament was Luo Honghao at 19 years of age,[15] while 46-year-old Mark Davis was the oldest; both players entered the main draw through qualifying.[16]

Three former world champions participated in the qualifying rounds: Ken Doherty (1997), Peter Ebdon (2002) and Graeme Dott. Of these, only Dott succeeded in qualifying for the main tournament at the Crucible. Also, four former world finalists participated in the qualifying rounds: Jimmy White (six times: 1984 and 1990–1994), Nigel Bond (once: 1995), Ali Carter and Matthew Stevens (twice: 2000 and 2005).[14][5] Of these, only Carter qualified for the main tournament at the Crucible.[14]

Tournament summaryEdit

Qualifying roundsEdit

 
James Cahill became the first-ever amateur to qualify for the World Championship main stage at the Crucible.

The top sixteen seeds automatically qualified for the main competition.[5] The defending champion Mark Williams was seeded first, whilst other seeds were allocated based on the world rankings following the China Open.[5] The remaining players competed in the preliminary qualifying rounds, and were required to win three best-of-19 matches to reach the finals.[5]

The qualifying rounds took place at the English Institute of Sport in Sheffield from 10 to 17 April 2019, with 16 players progressing to the finals. 128 players competed in the qualifying stage, including those tour players not automatically qualified for the main competition and invited amateurs.[17]

James Cahill became the first amateur player ever to qualify for the Crucible main stage of the World Championship, defeating fellow amateur Michael Judge 10–6 in the third qualifying round.[18] Seven players—the highest number since 1999—made it through the qualifying rounds to make their debuts at the main stage of the tournament. Besides Cahill, they were Scott Donaldson, Michael Georgiou, Li Hang, Luo Honghao, Tian Pengfei and Zhao Xintong.[19] 2006 World Champion Graeme Dott and two-time finalist Ali Carter also qualified for the main stage.[19] For the first time since 2004, Marco Fu failed to reach the main draw of the tournament.[20]

First roundEdit

The draw for the first round of the championship was made on 18 April 2019, the day after the conclusion of the qualifying rounds and two days before the start of the main event. The matches were drawn by World Snooker chairman Barry Hearn and 1991 World Champion John Parrott.[20] The first round of the championship took place between 20 and 25 April 2019. Each first round match was played over two sessions as best of 19 frames.[21]

Top halfEdit

The tournament began with defending champion Mark Williams (seeded one) drawing Martin Gould.[22][23] Gould took the first frame of the match with a break of 64, before Williams won the next five with breaks of 55, 54 and 129 to lead 5–1.[24] Gould won frames seven and eight, before Williams took the session's final frame with a break of 97 to lead 6–3.[24][25] The second session was also played on the opening day of the event. In frame ten Williams opened up a lead, before Gould made a clearance to force a respotted black, but it was Williams who potted the black to lead 7–3.[26] Gould won frame 11, to trail 4–7, before Williams won the next two frames to go ahead 9–4.[25] Gould fought back with breaks of 70, 87 and 76, to trail 7–9, before Williams won the match 10–7, clinching a "nervy" 17th frame.[25] After his victory, Williams complained World Snooker had not allowed his child backstage before the match, which the governing body denied.[27]

 
Shaun Murphy (seeded 13) completed the second ever whitewash at the World Championship main stage at the Crucible.

Shaun Murphy drew event debutant Luo Honghao. The match would be only the second whitewash ever at the Crucible, and the first since John Parrott defeated Eddie Charlton in 1992, finishing 10–0.[28] Luo accumulated the lowest number of points ever scored in a World Championship match. He accrued just 89 points during the entire match, more than 100 fewer than the previous record low of 191 scored by Danny Fowler when he lost 1–10 to Stephen Hendry in 1993.[28] Neil Robertson met Michael Georgiou in the first round; Georgiou trailed 0–9 at the conclusion of the first session, having scored even fewer points than Luo in those frames. However, Georgiou won frame ten on resumption of play in the second session with a break of 90, avoiding both the whitewash and low points total. Robertson later won 10–1.[28]

Fifth ranked John Higgins played Mark Davis, who had defeated him in six of the pair's last seven encounters.[29][30] Higgins gained a 6–3 lead after his initial session, before spending the night in Royal Hallamshire Hospital because his brother Jason had fractured his kneecap after falling down stairs at the venue. Higgins won the match the following day 10–7.[31]

Two former winners of the event, Graeme Dott (2006 winner) and Stuart Bingham (2015 winner), met in the first round of the competition. Bingham led 8–1 after the first session, and later 9–4, before Dott won five frames to level the match at 9–9. Bingham won the deciding frame after Dott missed a simple black ball shot.[32] After the match, Dott stated that "serious sleeping problems" had caused him issues while playing.[33]

Bottom halfEdit

 
Qualifier Gary Wilson won the longest ever World Championship frame at the Crucible in the first round decider against Luca Brecel.

The match between Gary Wilson and Luca Brecel, which featured a large amount of tactical play, had to be suspended when the afternoon session overran with Wilson leading 9–8.[34] When the match resumed in the evening, Brecel won frame 18 to send the match to a deciding frame. This frame first required a re-rack, then set the record for the longest frame ever played at the Crucible, at 79 minutes and 31 seconds.[b][34] After leading 6–3 overnight, Ding Junhui defeated Anthony McGill 10–7.[35]

Having lost in the first round eight times in his previous 15 appearances at the Crucible, Stephen Maguire played debutant Tian Pengfei. In frame 17, Maguire was 7–9 down and needed a snooker on the colours to stay in the match. He won a snooker on the blue, then missed a risky pot to a baulk corner, but the blue hit the cue ball again and went into another baulk pocket, a shot later called "an outrageous fluke" by Maguire.[36] He added pink and black to steal the frame, and then took the next two frames to win 10–9.[37] Former three-time winner and world number 2 Mark Selby played debutant Zhao Xintong. Despite having been behind 1–5 after the first six frames, Selby won nine of the next eleven frames with two breaks of 131 to win 10–7.[16]

Amateur player James Cahill drew the world number one Ronnie O'Sullivan, who had been in the final of both Triple Crown events earlier in the season. Cahill took the final frame of the first session to lead 5–4, and took an 8–5 lead in the second session, before O'Sullivan tied the match up at 8–8.[38] Cahill made an early break in frame 17, but fell apart on a simple red; O'Sullivan simply needed the final pink and black to win the frame, but missed the pink, allowing Cahill to take the frame. Cahill won the match 10–8 with a break of 56 in the final frame.[39] The win was Cahill's second win over the first ranked player in the season, having defeated Mark Selby in the first round of the 2018 UK Championship earlier in the season.[40] O'Sullivan commented after the match that he had been unwell during the match, however former champion Ken Doherty accused O'Sullivan of "playing too casually".[41]

Second roundEdit

The second round of the championships was played between 25 and 29 April, with matches completed over three sessions as best of 25 frames. The first session of the match between Shaun Murphy and Neil Robertson featured a maximum break attempt by Murphy.[42] With just the last two reds remaining, he asked for the divider between the tables to be removed to allow all spectators to see the break attempt; however, he failed to finish it.[43] Robertson won the initial three frames of the match, without Murphy attempting a pot. He led 5–3 after the first session, and 10–6 after the second.[44] Robertson later won the first three frames of the final session to win 13–6.[45] Post match, Murphy called Robertson "just too good" and "unplayable".[45]

 
16th seeded David Gilbert defeated the defending champion Mark Williams in the second round. He went on to reach the semi-finals.

Defending champion Mark Williams played David Gilbert. After the first session, with Gilbert leading 5–3,[46] Williams said he had suffered chest pains post session.[47] He was taken to Northern General Hospital overnight, but returned for the second session of the match, the following day.[47] Williams later tied the match at 7–7, but trailed 7–9 after the second session.[48] Gilbert then won the first four frames of the final session to win 13–9.[49][50]

Amateur player James Cahill drew fifteenth seed Stephen Maguire. Maguire led 5–3 and 9–7 after the first two sessions.[51] Cahill took three of the first four frames in the third session to draw level at 10–10. Cahill then won frame 21, to take the lead for the first time in the match, with Maguire drawing level in the following frame.[52] Frame 23 saw both players miss shots, with Cahill looking to win the frame before being penalised for a waistcoat foul, and later going in-off from a cannon, allowing Maguire to take the frame. Cahill won frame 24, after Maguire missed a green ball by a wide margin.[53] In the deciding frame, Maguire won the match 13–12.[52][54]

Three-time champion Mark Selby played qualifier Gary Wilson, but trailed 3–5 after the first session, before winning four out of the first five frames in the second session to lead 7–6. Wilson, however, won the remaining three frames of the session to lead 9–7.[46] Selby later tied the match at 10–10, before Wilson won the next three frames to qualify for the quarter-finals.[49][55] 2013 runner-up Barry Hawkins won the first four frames of his match with Kyren Wilson,[22] with the first session finishing 6–2 to Hawkins. Hawkins made four century breaks of 105, 130, 111, and 137 including a maximum break attempt.[43][56] Wilson also made a century break in frame five, with four frames in a row being won with a century for the first time since Ronnie O'Sullivan and Stephen Hendry in 1999.[56] Wilson, however, won the match's second session 5–3 to trail 7–9, before drawing level at 9–9 in the final session.[57] Despite Hawkins taking leads at 10–9 and 11–10, Wilson won the last three frames to progress, winning 13–11.[58] The match saw a record-equalling nine century breaks for a second round match at the world championships.[59]

Zhou Yuelong played Ali Carter in the only all-qualifier tie of the second round. Zhou took four of the first five frames to lead 4–1, then led after the first session 5–3, and held the lead at 9–7. On resuming the match in the final session, Carter won six straight frames to win 13–9.[58] Two former finalists, Judd Trump and Ding Junhui, met in the second round. Trump was ahead 5–1, before Ding took eight of the next ten frames to lead 9–7. Trump then won six frames in a row, including breaks of 93, 79, 54 and 103, to win the match 13–9.[60]

Quarter-finalsEdit

The quarter-finals took place on 30 April and 1 May, and like the previous round, matches were played as best of 25 frames across three sessions. In an all-qualifier match, Ali Carter played Gary Wilson. Despite playing in his first world championship quarter-final and losing the first three frames of the match, Wilson won five straight frames to lead 5–3 after the first session.[61] The pair shared the next session, with both players winning four frames; Wilson led 9–7 into the final session.[62] Carter won two of the next three frames, including a break of 128 to trail 9–10, with Wilson winning the next three to progress 13–9.[63][64] Post-match, Carter said, "You have to take your hat off to [Wilson]. I did not think he could play that good", noting that despite his low ranking of 32, Wilson "has to be the favourite to win it now, the way he has been playing".[61]

2019 Masters winner Judd Trump played 15th seed Stephen Maguire. Trump had won six straight frames to win his second round match against Ding Junhui, and won the first six frames of this match scoring breaks of 131, 67, 106, 78 and 101, to lead 7–1 after the first session.[65] In the second session, Trump looked set to win the match without needing to play the final session, extending his lead to 9–1, however, Maguire won four of the remaining frames to trail 5–11 by the end of the session. Trump won the match after just three frames of the final session 13–6.[66][67] Maguire was fined for swearing in a post-match press conference, where he stated his performance was "shit".[66][68][67]

 
4th seed Neil Robertson, lost in the quarter-finals to John Higgins.

David Gilbert played Kyren Wilson. The two had met in the 2019 German Masters final earlier in the season, with Wilson winning the tournament 9–7.[69] The two players shared the opening session 4–4 and Gilbert won six of the eight frames in the second session to lead 10–6 overnight.[66] Wilson won two of the first three frames of the final session to trail 8–11, but Gilbert took the final two frames to win the match 13–8.[66][70]

Four-time world champion John Higgins played Neil Robertson. Robertson took an early 3–1 lead, but Higgins tied the match at 4–4. Robertson pulled away to 7–4, with Higgins winning five frames in a row to take a 9–7 lead.[66] Higgins won the match 13–10, after sharing the final session, with a century break of 101 in the final frame to win.[71][72]

Semi-finalsEdit

 
John Higgins reached his third consecutive World Championship final, his career eighth.

The two semi-finals were played from 2 to 5 May and were best-of-33-frame matches spread over four sessions. The first semi-final pitted four-time champion John Higgins against David Gilbert, who had never previously progressed past the second round.[73] Higgins took the first two frames, but Gilbert tied the match at 2–2 with a break of 94.[74] Higgins then took a 3–2 lead, before Gilbert won the next three frames, including a maximum attempt, potting 15 red balls but failing a double on the black, to lead 5–3.[74]

The second session saw Gilbert increase his lead to 8–3, by winning three more frames including a 125 break.[75] He was also ahead 56–17 in frame 12 but missed a frame-ball pink into the middle pocket, before Higgins cleared the table to trail 4–8. Higgins also won the next two frames with breaks of 67, 52 and 58 to trail 6–8.[75] Gilbert, however, won the final two frames of the session to lead 10–6.[76] Pundit John Virgo said "[Higgins] is not with it", whilst six-time champion Steve Davis called Higgins' performance "ridiculous".[76]

On the return of the match for the third session, a member of the crowd was removed for shouting out just after the break off shot in the initial frame, which was won by Gilbert to increase his lead to 11–6.[66] Higgins won two of the next three frames to stay four behind at 8–12.[77] Frame 21 saw Higgins make a 143 break, the highest of the tournament, and also the 86th century break of the tournament, tying the record for century breaks in one world championship, which was first set in 2015.[77] Gilbert won the next frame, falling short of a century, with a break of 91.[77] Despite this, Higgins won the final two frames of the session to trail 11–13.[78]

In the fourth and final session, Gilbert took frame 25, but Higgins won the next four frames to go ahead for the first time since leading 3–2 in the first session of the match.[79] Gilbert won the next two frames, to lead 16–15, before Higgins scored a 139 break to level the match at 16–16. The deciding frame was won by Higgins, after Gilbert missed the black ball from the spot.[79] Post-match, both players gave emotional press conferences, with Gilbert commenting, "I have never won anything, I have come close but this is the best couple of weeks I have had in my snooker career by a mile. It might be the closest I will come to winning the World Championship".[80] Higgins apologised for his poor play during the match, and for bringing Gilbert "down to [Higgins'] level in the first three sessions."[81]

The second semi-final was played between Judd Trump and qualifier Gary Wilson. They shared the opening session, 4–4, and Wilson later took the lead at 6–5, thanks to a break of 65. Trump won the next three frames with breaks of 73, 123 and 75 to lead 9–6 before Wilson compiled a 77 break, bringing the score to 9–7 after two sessions.[82] Both players were "nervy" during the third session.[83] Wilson won frame 17 with a break of 50;[84] however, Trump won the next three frames, including a break of 114, which was the 87th century of the championship (the all-time highest number of centuries compiled at any world championship).[85] Trump was 14–10 ahead going into the final session of the semi-final.[64]

Wilson took the first frame in the final session, but Trump won the next three frames to win the match 17–11.[86] After the match, Trump suggested that despite them reaching the final, neither he nor Higgins had played particularly well in their respective semi-final matches.[87] Wilson, ranked 30 in the world, said that, "Judd deserved to win", but commented on the playing conditions being poor, saying: "I wasn't good enough yesterday, but I've got to say that table is disgusting. It's running off all over the place, you're getting square bounces, kicks every other shot".[88][89]

FinalEdit

 
In a repeat of the 2011 World Championship final, Judd Trump captured his maiden World Championship title. By doing so he also completed a career Triple Crown.

The final was played over four sessions, as a best-of-35-frames match. It was a repeat of the 2011 World Snooker Championship final between John Higgins and Judd Trump, when Higgins won his fourth world championship, 18–15.[71] Higgins defeated Mark Davis, Stuart Bingham, Neil Robertson and David Gilbert to reach the final; whilst Trump defeated Thepchaiya Un-Nooh, Ding Junhui, Stephen Maguire and Gary Wilson. In reaching it, Higgins competed in his third straight world championship final, having been defeated by Mark Selby in 2017, and Mark Williams in 2018. This was Higgins' eighth final, having won four previously in 1998, 2007, 2009 and 2011, one short of the record held by Stephen Hendry, .[90] This was Trump's second final, his first being the 2011 loss to Higgins.[90]

Trump won the first two frames of the opening session, with breaks of 51 and 63.[91] Higgins replied with a break of 139 to trail 1–2, before Trump scored a century of his own, a 105, to take a two-frame lead at the first mid-session interval. Breaks of 69, 34, 40 and 101 saw Higgins notch up 244 unanswered points and three frames on the bounce to lead 4–3.[91] Trump then tied the match at 4–4 by compiling the fourth century of the session.[91] After the first session, Trump commented on the temperature of the arena, calling it too cold, which tournament officials denied.[92]

At the beginning of the nine-frame evening session, Higgins compiled a break of 125, the third consecutive century of the match, to move ahead 5–4.[93] Trump won the remaining eight frames of the session, including breaks of 135 and 114,[94] to lead by seven frames overnight, 12–5. Six-time champion Steve Davis commented on the session saying, "I've seen some astonishing snooker here, a lot of it from Ronnie O'Sullivan, but that was a different type of astonishing. I am a little bit in shock. He is making a lot of very difficult shots seem very easy."[95]

The third session opened with an attempt at a maximum break from Higgins, who potted 14 reds and blacks before running out of position for the red ball; he played an impressive full-table double to pot the red, but then missed the following black. He also won frame 19, to trail 7–12, but Trump took the next three to extend his lead to 15–7.[96] Higgins won the following two frames, preventing the match from concluding with a session to spare. Frame 25 saw Trump attempt a maximum break of his own, but he overcut a red ball into the middle pocket.[96] Going into the evening session with a 16–9 lead, Trump won two straight frames to win the match 18–9 and claim the title.[97] The win was the biggest margin of victory in a world championship final since 2009, when Higgins defeated Shaun Murphy by the same scoreline.[98]

With eleven centuries between them, the final set the record for the most 100+ breaks in a single match, one more than the previous record held by Alan McManus and Ding Junhui in the semi-final of the 2016 event.[99] After the final, Higgins praised Trump's performance, "I was the lucky one to not have to pay for a ticket, he was just awesome".[99] BBC pundit Steve Davis commented that, "The standard in that final may have been the greatest we have ever seen and Judd Trump was at the heart of it."[99] This was Trump's second Triple Crown title of the season after winning the Masters in January.

Prize fundEdit

The total purse for the event was greater than any prior snooker event. For the first time the total prize pool was over £2 million, with the winner being awarded £500,000.[100][101][c] The breakdown of prize money was:[13]

Main Stage maximum break: £50,000[13]

Main drawEdit

Numbers shown in brackets show the player's seedings shown following the 16 seeded players. An (a) follows the championship's sole amateur player.[102]

First round Second round Quarter-finals Semi-finals
Best of 19 frames Best of 25 frames Best of 25 frames Best of 33 frames
                           
20 April            
   Mark Williams (WAL) (1)  10
26 & 27 April
   Martin Gould (ENG)  7  
   Mark Williams (1)  9
22 & 23 April
     David Gilbert (16)  13  
   David Gilbert (ENG) (16)  10
30 April & 1 May
   Joe Perry (ENG)  7  
   David Gilbert (16)  13
24 April
     Kyren Wilson (8)  8  
    Barry Hawkins (ENG) (9)  10
28 & 29 April
   Li Hang (CHN)  1  
   Barry Hawkins (9)  11
24 & 25 April
     Kyren Wilson (8)  13  
   Kyren Wilson (ENG) (8)  10
2, 3 & 4 May
   Scott Donaldson (SCO)  4  
   David Gilbert (16)  16
21 & 22 April
     John Higgins (5)  17
   John Higgins (SCO) (5)  10
27, 28 & 29 April
   Mark Davis (ENG)  7  
   John Higgins (5)  13
23 April
     Stuart Bingham (12)  11  
   Stuart Bingham (ENG) (12)  10
30 April & 1 May
   Graeme Dott (SCO)  9  
   John Higgins (5)  13
21 & 22 April
     Neil Robertson (4)  10  
    Shaun Murphy (ENG) (13)  10
25 & 26 April
   Luo Honghao (CHN)  0  
   Shaun Murphy (13)  6
20 & 21 April
     Neil Robertson (4)  13  
   Neil Robertson (AUS) (4)  10
   Michael Georgiou (CYP)  1  
22 April            
    Mark Selby (ENG) (3)  10
25, 26 & 27 April
   Zhao Xintong (CHN)  7  
   Mark Selby (3)  10
20 & 21 April
     Gary Wilson  13  
   Luca Brecel (BEL) (14)  9
30 April & 1 May
   Gary Wilson (ENG)  10  
   Gary Wilson  13
24 & 25 April
     Ali Carter  9  
   Jack Lisowski (ENG) (11)  6
28 & 29 April
   Ali Carter (ENG)  10  
   Ali Carter  13
23 & 24 April
     Zhou Yuelong  9  
   Mark Allen (NIR) (6)  7
2, 3 & 4 May
    Zhou Yuelong (CHN)  10  
   Gary Wilson  11
23 & 24 April
     Judd Trump (7)  17
   Judd Trump (ENG) (7)  10
27, 28 & 29 April
   Thepchaiya Un-Nooh (THA)  9  
   Judd Trump (7)  13
20 & 21 April
     Ding Junhui (10)  9  
   Ding Junhui (CHN) (10)  10
30 April & 1 May
   Anthony McGill (SCO)  7  
   Judd Trump (7)  13
20 & 21 April
     Stephen Maguire (15)  6  
   Stephen Maguire (SCO) (15)  10
26 & 27 April
   Tian Pengfei (CHN)  9  
   Stephen Maguire (15)  13
22 & 23 April
     James Cahill (a)  12  
   Ronnie O'Sullivan (ENG) (2)  8
   James Cahill (ENG) (a)  10  
Final: (Best of 35 frames) Crucible Theatre, Sheffield, 5 & 6 May.
Referee: Leo Scullion.[103]
John Higgins (5)
  Scotland
9–18 Judd Trump (7)
  England
Players Session 1: 4–4
Frame 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Higgins 1 45 139 (139) 0 70 (69) 74 101 (101) 4 N/A N/A
Trump 66 (51) 72 (63) 0 105 (105) 8 0 0 103 (103) N/A N/A
Players Session 2: 1–8 (5–12)
Frame 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Higgins 125 (125) 0 4 45 0 30 28 20 19 N/A
Trump 1 66 139 (135) 67 118 (114) 64 95 (71) 70 (58) 85 (70) N/A
Players Session 3: 4–4 (9–16)
Frame 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Higgins 113 (113) 60 (59) 0 0 0 92 (67) 79 (70) 0 N/A N/A
Trump 0 35 101 (101) 72 (71) 126 (126) 16 11 104 (104) N/A N/A
Players Session 4: 0–2 (9–18)
Frame 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Higgins 0 1 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Trump 94 (94) 63 (62) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
139 Highest break 135
4 Century breaks 7
8 50+ breaks 15
  Judd Trump wins the 2019 Betfred World Snooker Championship

  = Winner of frame

QualifyingEdit

128 competed in the qualifying competition. There were three qualifying rounds, with the sixteen winners of the third round matches progressing to the main stages of the tournament at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield. Qualifying took place from 10 to 17 April 2019 at the English Institute of Sport, also in Sheffield, in a 12-table set-up. All matches were best of 19 frames.[104]

The tour players (ranked outside the top-16) were joined by amateur/wildcard players who achieved success through the WPBSA qualifying criteria:[14]

Players ranked 17–80 in the 2018/2019 world rankings were seeded 1–64 in qualifying.[f] The remaining tour players plus the invited amateurs were drawn randomly.[g]

Round 1Edit

Round 2Edit

Round 3Edit

Winners advanced to the main draw.

Century breaksEdit

Main stage centuriesEdit

100 centuries were made by 23 players during the main stage of the World Championship.[107] John Higgins made the highest break of the tournament, a 143 in his semi-final match with David Gilbert.[107]The event broke many records for the number of century breaks, including for the total number in the main stage of a snooker event, fourteen more than the record of 86 in the 2015 and 2016 events.[99] The final also saw the highest number of century breaks in one match, 11 centuries, more than Ding vs. McManus in the 2016 semi-final. Trump equalled Ding's record for centuries made by one player in a match with seven.[99]

Qualifying stage centuriesEdit

122 century breaks were made by 57 players during the qualifying stage of the World Championship.[108]

CoverageEdit

The tournament was broadcast live in the UK by BBC TV and BBC Online, as well as on Eurosport.[109] Internationally, the event was broadcast by DAZN in Canada and the United States, by SKY in New Zealand, and by Now TV in Hong Kong.[110][111] The event was also broadcast by World Snooker internationally on Facebook, doing so for the second time.[112] Coverage for the qualifying event was also broadcast on Facebook, Eurosport Player and selected betting sites.[112]

In Scotland, the BBC was criticised for showing the world championships on BBC Scotland, rather than a speech by Scotland's first minister Nicola Sturgeon on Scottish independence. The BBC defended the decision saying the speech was broadcast live on its BBC Scotland news website.[113]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ In the event that the defending champion was ranked outside of the top 16, he would have replaced the player ranked world number 16 as an automatic qualifier.[5]
  2. ^ This beat the previous record set in 2016 by Mark Selby and Marco Fu by more than three minutes.[34]
  3. ^ Prior to this, the highest prize purse was for the 2018 World Snooker Championship, with a total pool of £1,968,000, and £425,000 for the winner of the event.[101]
  4. ^ Dorgham was the runner up of the event.[105]
  5. ^ Zhang Jiankang, who withdrew with visa problems, was replaced by Michael Judge.[14]
  6. ^ Jamie Jones ranked 61 was serving a suspension, and did not compete in the championships.[106]
  7. ^ Li Yuan ranked 97 did not compete in the championships.[14]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Snooker championship". Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer. 11 May 1927. Retrieved 12 March 2019 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  2. ^ Clare, Peter (2008). "Origins of Snooker". Snooker Heritage. Archived from the original on 3 January 2017. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  3. ^ Everton, Clive (1991). Snooker and Billiards: Techniques, Tactics and Training (Crowood Sports Guides). The Crowood Press. Chapter 1. ISBN 1-85223-480-6
  4. ^ "The Rise Of China – World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 19 April 2018. Retrieved 13 March 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "2019 Betfred World Snooker Championship – World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 12 July 2018. Retrieved 6 March 2019.
  6. ^ a b c "Crucible Draw And Format – World Snooker". World Snooker. 9 April 2019. Archived from the original on 17 April 2018. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  7. ^ Turner, Chris. "World Professional Championship". cajt.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk. Chris Turner's Snooker Archive. Archived from the original on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 9 February 2011.
  8. ^ "1927 World Professional Championship". globalsnookercentre.co.uk. Global Snooker Centre. Archived from the original on 10 October 2004. Retrieved 29 February 2012.
  9. ^ Historic England. "The Crucible Theatre (1392311)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 December 2013.
  10. ^ "World Championship – Roll of Honour". Global Snooker. Archived from the original on 22 February 2012. Retrieved 18 March 2013.
  11. ^ Hafez, Shamoon (7 May 2018). "World Championship: Mark Williams beats John Higgins to win title". bbc.com. BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 7 May 2018. Retrieved 8 May 2018.
  12. ^ "Williams Conquers Crucible". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 7 May 2018. Archived from the original on 7 August 2018. Retrieved 21 September 2018.
  13. ^ a b c "Indicative Prize Money Rankings Schedule 2018/2019 Season" (PDF). worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 18 July 2018. Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 July 2018. Retrieved 21 September 2018.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g "Criteria Set For Crucible Qualifiers". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 11 March 2019. Archived from the original on 8 April 2019. Retrieved 7 April 2019.
  15. ^ "Odds against China's record snooker stars at World Championships". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 21 April 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  16. ^ a b "World Championship 2019: Mark Selby through after scare at the Crucible". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 22 April 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  17. ^ "Betfred World Snooker Championship | Official Booking Office". cruciblesnooker.com. Archived from the original on 9 February 2019. Retrieved 6 March 2019.
  18. ^ "Amateur Cahill To Make Crucible History". World Snooker. 17 April 2019. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  19. ^ a b "Four Chinese Potters Set For Crucible Debut – World Snooker". World Snooker. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  20. ^ a b "Betfred World Championship Draw – World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 18 April 2019. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  21. ^ "World Championship snooker 2019: Draw, schedule, results". Sporting Life. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  22. ^ a b "Tale of the Tape: Barry Hawkins vs Kyren Wilson – World Snooker". World Snooker. Retrieved 28 April 2019.
  23. ^ "Tale of the Tape: Williams Vs Gould – World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 20 April 2019. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  24. ^ a b "Strong Start For Crucible King Williams – World Snooker". World Snooker. 20 April 2019. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  25. ^ a b c Phillips, Owen (20 April 2019). "World Championship 2019: Champion Mark Williams into second round with 10–7 win v Martin Gould". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 20 April 2019. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  26. ^ "Williams Starts Title Defence With Win – World Snooker". World Snooker. 20 April 2019. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  27. ^ "Mark Williams hits out at officials after World Championship win". the Guardian. Archived from the original on 21 April 2019. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  28. ^ a b c Phillips, Owen (22 April 2019). "World Championship 2019: Shaun Murphy records 10–0 win at Crucible". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 22 April 2019. Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  29. ^ "John Higgins overcomes brother's bad break at Crucible to progress". Eurosport UK. 22 April 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  30. ^ "World Championship: John Higgins happy to face early Mark Davis test". BBC Sport. 19 April 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  31. ^ "World Snooker Championship 2019: John Higgins keen to face Graeme Dott in round two". BBC Sport. 22 April 2019. Archived from the original on 22 April 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  32. ^ Phillips, Owen (23 April 2019). "World Championship 2019: Stuart Bingham resists Graeme Dott fightback". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 23 April 2019. Retrieved 24 April 2019.
  33. ^ "World Championship 2019: Graeme Dott says sleep problems ruining career". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 25 April 2019. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  34. ^ a b c "Wilson Downs Brecel In Crucible's Longest Frame". World Snooker. 22 April 2019. Archived from the original on 21 April 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  35. ^ "World Championship 2019: Neil Robertson and Ding Junhui win, Shaun Murphy leads". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 22 April 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  36. ^ "Fluked Blue Helps Stephen Maguire Through – SnookerHQ". SnookerHQ. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  37. ^ "'Crazy' Fluke Helps Maguire Beat Tian". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 22 April 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  38. ^ Phillips, Owen (23 April 2019). "World Championship 2019: Ronnie O'Sullivan suffers shock defeat by James Cahill". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 23 April 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  39. ^ "Ronnie O'Sullivan knocked out of World Championship in first round by amateur James Cahill". The Independent. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  40. ^ sport, Guardian. "Ronnie O'Sullivan suffers shock Crucible defeat to amateur James Cahill". the Guardian. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  41. ^ "Ronnie O'Sullivan: Ken Doherty accuses world number one of playing casually". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 24 April 2019. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  42. ^ "World Snooker: Shaun Murphy asks for screen to be lifted during 147 attempt – BBC Sport". BBC Sport. Retrieved 26 April 2019.
  43. ^ a b "World Snooker: Barry Hawkins misses easy black as he closes in on 147 – BBC Sport". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 29 April 2019. Retrieved 29 April 2019.
  44. ^ "Tale of the Tape: Murphy vs Robertson – World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 25 April 2019. Retrieved 26 April 2019.
  45. ^ a b "World Championship 2019: Neil Robertson thrashes Shaun Murphy 13–6 to reach quarter-finals". BBC Sport. Retrieved 26 April 2019.
  46. ^ a b "World Championship 2019: Mark Williams & Mark Selby trail in second-round games". BBC Sport. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  47. ^ a b "Mark Williams: World snooker champion in hospital with chest pains". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 26 April 2019. Retrieved 26 April 2019.
  48. ^ "Mark Williams on health scare: Doctors confident heart is fine". Eurosport. 26 April 2019. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  49. ^ a b "World Championship 2019: Three-time champions Mark Williams & Mark Selby exit". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 27 April 2019. Retrieved 28 April 2019.
  50. ^ "Gilbert Floors Champ Williams – World Snooker". World Snooker. Retrieved 28 April 2019.
  51. ^ "World Championship 2019: Neil Robertson thrashes Shaun Murphy 13–6 to reach quarter-finals". BBC Sport. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  52. ^ a b "World Snooker Championship: James Cahill beaten 13–12 by Stephen Maguire". sportinglife.com. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  53. ^ "James Cahill's Betfred World Championship dream ends with a final frame loss to Stephen Maguire". blackpoolgazette.co.uk. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  54. ^ "Stephen Maguire ends James Cahill dream run, Mark Selby latest big name to fall at Crucible". Eurosport. 27 April 2019. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  55. ^ "World Championship 2019: Mark Selby loses to Gary Wilson". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 27 April 2019. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  56. ^ a b "Four-Ton Hawk Leads Wilson – World Snooker". World Snooker. Retrieved 28 April 2019.
  57. ^ "Kyren Wilson fights back in World Championship clash with Barry Hawkins – Evening Express". Evening Express. Retrieved 29 April 2019.
  58. ^ a b "Ali Carter hits back in style to book quarter-final spot". Eurosport Asia. 29 April 2019. Retrieved 29 April 2019.
  59. ^ "World Championship 2019: Judd Trump beats Ding Junhui to reach quarter-finals". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 30 April 2019. Retrieved 30 April 2019.
  60. ^ "World Championship 2019: Judd Trump beats Ding Junhui to reach quarter-finals". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 30 April 2019. Retrieved 30 April 2019. 93, 79, 54 and 103
  61. ^ a b "World Snooker Championship: Qualifier Gary Wilson beats Ali Carter to reach semi-final". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 1 May 2019. Retrieved 1 May 2019.
  62. ^ "Gary Wilson downs Ali Carter to continue brilliant run". Eurosport UK. 5 January 2019. Archived from the original on 1 May 2019. Retrieved 1 May 2019.
  63. ^ "World Snooker Championship: Gary Wilson beats Ali Carter to reach the semi-finals; John Higgins progresses". sportinglife.com. Archived from the original on 1 May 2019. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  64. ^ a b "World Championship: Judd Trump extends lead over Gary Wilson". sportinglife.com. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  65. ^ "World Championship 2019: Judd Trump opens up 7–1 lead over Stephen Maguire". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 30 April 2019. Retrieved 1 May 2019.
  66. ^ a b c d e f "World Championship: Judd Trump leads Gary Wilson 9–7; John Higgins fights back". sportinglife.com. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  67. ^ a b "World Snooker Championship: Judd Trump eases past Stephen Maguire to reach semi-finals". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 1 May 2019. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  68. ^ "Qualifier Gary Wilson downs Carter, Gilbert sinks Kyren Wilson, Trump topples Maguire". Eurosport UK. 5 January 2019. Archived from the original on 1 May 2019. Retrieved 1 May 2019.
  69. ^ "Kyren Wilson beats David Gilbert to win dramatic German Masters final". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 24 April 2019. Retrieved 1 May 2019.
  70. ^ "Gilbert Reaches Maiden Crucible Semi-Final – World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 1 May 2019. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  71. ^ a b "World Snooker: Higgins beats Trump to win fourth title". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 25 October 2018. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  72. ^ "Higgins rolls back the years to reach final four, Gilbert, Trump and qualifier Wilson all through". Eurosport UK. 5 January 2019. Archived from the original on 1 May 2019. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  73. ^ "Tale of the Tape: John Higgins vs David Gilbert – World Snooker". World Snooker. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  74. ^ a b "Gilbert Takes Early Lead Over Higgins – World Snooker". World Snooker. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  75. ^ a b "Gilbert Extends Semi-Final Lead – World Snooker". World Snooker. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  76. ^ a b "World Snooker Championship: David Gilbert takes control against John Higgins". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 3 May 2019. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  77. ^ a b c "John Higgins rallies after dismal world championship session against Gilbert". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 4 May 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  78. ^ "Catch-up: World Snooker Championship semi-finals – Trump v Wilson & Higgins v Gilbert". BBC Sport. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  79. ^ a b "World Snooker Championship 2019: Judd Trump to meet John Higgins in final". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 5 May 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  80. ^ "World Snooker Championship 2019: Judd Trump to meet John Higgins in final". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 5 May 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019. I have never won anything, I have come close but this is the best couple of weeks I have had in my snooker career by a mile. It might be the closest I will come to winning the World Championship.
  81. ^ "Higgins beats Gilbert in last-frame thriller to set up final against Trump". the Guardian. Archived from the original on 5 May 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019. down to my level in the first three sessions
  82. ^ "World Snooker Championship: John Higgins two behind David Gilbert". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 3 May 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  83. ^ "Judd Trump takes four-frame lead over Wilson after tense semi-final session". Eurosport UK. 5 March 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  84. ^ "World Snooker Championship 2019: Judd Trump to meet John Higgins in final". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 5 May 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  85. ^ "World Championship: Judd Trump extends lead over Gary Wilson". sportinglife.com. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  86. ^ "Judd Trump sets up John Higgins final after dismissing Gary Wilson". Eurosport. 5 April 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  87. ^ "Judd Trump sets up John Higgins final after dismissing Gary Wilson". Eurosport. 5 April 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  88. ^ "World Snooker Championship 2019: Judd Trump to meet John Higgins in final". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 5 May 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019. It's running off all over the place, you're getting square bounces, kicks every other shot
  89. ^ "Gary Wilson: The tables spoiled the game". Video Eurosport UK. 5 April 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  90. ^ a b "Trump v Higgins: Tale of the Tape – World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 5 May 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  91. ^ a b c "Trump and Higgins Share Opening Session – World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 5 May 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  92. ^ Nunns, Hector (27 April 2019). "Judd Trump complains it is too cold in World Snooker Championship final". mirror. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  93. ^ "World Championship snooker final live blog and score as John Higgins takes on Judd Trump at the Crucible". sportinglife.com. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  94. ^ "Trump Takes Command In Crucible Final – World Snooker". World Snooker. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  95. ^ "World Championship 2019: Judd Trump leads John Higgins 12–5 in Crucible final". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 5 May 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019. He is making a lot of very difficult shots seem very easy.
  96. ^ a b "Judd Trump leads John Higgins 16–9". Sporting Life. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  97. ^ "Trump Tops The World". 6 May 2019.
  98. ^ Bower, Aaron. "Judd Trump sears to World Snooker Championship win over John Higgins". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  99. ^ a b c d e "World Championship 2019: Judd Trump beats John Higgins 18–9 in Crucible final". BBC Sport. Retrieved 7 May 2019.
  100. ^ "2018/19 Prize Money – World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 25 July 2018. Retrieved 6 March 2019.
  101. ^ a b Caufield, David (14 November 2018). "Barry Hearn: "prize money has grown from £3.5 million to £15 million." – SnookerHQ". SnookerHQ. Archived from the original on 14 November 2018. Retrieved 6 March 2019.
  102. ^ "The Cruicible Theatre, Sheffield 20 April – 6 May 2019. Provisional order of play" (PDF). worldsnooker.com. Archived (PDF) from the original on 9 April 2019. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  103. ^ "Referee Scullion Picked For First World Final – World Snooker". World Snooker. 20 March 2019. Archived from the original on 20 March 2019. Retrieved 20 March 2019.
  104. ^ Beardmore, Michael (18 April 2019). "World Snooker Championship: A closer look at the pressure of the qualifiers". BBC News. Archived from the original on 19 April 2019. Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  105. ^ "Ibrahim Awarded World Snooker Tour Card – World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 16 August 2018. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  106. ^ "Independent Appeals Committee Finding: Jamie Jones". World Snooker. 3 April 2019. Archived from the original on 7 April 2019. Retrieved 7 April 2019.
  107. ^ a b "Betfred World Championship 2019 – Centuries". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 20 April 2019. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  108. ^ "Betfred World Championship 2019 Qualifiers – Centuries". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 10–18 April 2019. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  109. ^ WherestheMatch.com. "Live Snooker On Eurosport | Eurosport Snooker TV Schedule UK". wheresthematch.com. Archived from the original on 17 June 2017. Retrieved 8 May 2018.
  110. ^ "Tournament Broadcasters 2018–19 – World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 10 January 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  111. ^ "DAZN To Broadcast World Championship In USA – World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 19 April 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  112. ^ a b "Facebook Live Broadcasts World Snooker Championship – SnookerHQ". SnookerHQ. 11 April 2018. Archived from the original on 11 April 2018. Retrieved 12 March 2019.
  113. ^ "BBC defends decision to broadcast snooker over First Minister's speech". The National. Archived from the original on 26 April 2019. Retrieved 27 April 2019.