2012 World Snooker Championship

The 2012 World Snooker Championship (officially the 2012 Betfred.com World Snooker Championship) was a professional snooker tournament that took place from 21 April to 7 May 2012 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England. It was the 36th consecutive year that the World Snooker Championship had been held at the Crucible and the last ranking of the 2011–12 snooker season. The event was broadcast in the United Kingdom by the BBC, and in Europe by Eurosport.

2012 Betfred.com World Snooker Championship
World Snooker Championship logo.jpg
Tournament information
Dates21 April – 7 May 2012 (2012-04-21 – 2012-05-07)
VenueCrucible Theatre
CitySheffield
CountryEngland
OrganisationWorld Snooker
FormatRanking event
Total prize fund£1,152,500
Winner's share£250,000
Highest break Stephen Hendry (SCO) (147)
Final
Champion Ronnie O'Sullivan (ENG)
Runner-up Ali Carter (ENG)
Score18–11
2011
2013

Ronnie O'Sullivan won his fourth world title by defeating Ali Carter 18–11 in the final. Aged 36, O'Sullivan became the oldest world champion since 45-year-old Ray Reardon in 1978. John Higgins, the defending champion, lost 4–13 to Stephen Hendry in the second round. Hendry made the highest break during the tournament, a maximum break of 147. Hendry, seven-time winner of the event, announced his retirement from professional snooker following his defeat by Stephen Maguire in the quarter-finals.

OverviewEdit

The World Snooker Championship is an annual cue sport tournament and the official world championship of the game of snooker.[1] Invented in the late 19th century by British Army soldiers stationed in India,[2] the sport was popular in Great Britain.[3] In modern times it has been played worldwide, especially in East and Southeast Asian nations such as China, Hong Kong and Thailand.[4]

In the 2012 tournament, 32 professional players competed in one-on-one snooker matches played over several frames, using a single-elimination tournament format.[5] The 32 players were selected for the event using the snooker world rankings and a pre-tournament qualification competition.[6] In 1927, the first world championship was won by Joe Davis. The event's final took place in Camkin's Hall, Birmingham, England.[7][8] Since 1977, the event has been held at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England.[9] The event was organised by the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association.[10][11] Scotsman John Higgins was the defending champion, having defeated Judd Trump 18–15 in the previous year's final.[12] The event was sponsored by sports betting company Betfred.[10]

FormatEdit

The 2012 World Snooker Championship took place from 21 April to 7 May 2008 in Sheffield, England. The tournament was the last of nine ranking events in the 2011–12 snooker season on the World Snooker Tour.[13] It featured a 32-player main draw that was held at the Crucible Theatre, as well as a qualifying draw that was played at the English Institute of Sport in Sheffield from 5 to 15 April.[14] This was the 36th consecutive year that the tournament had been staged at the Crucible.[15] The main stages of the event were broadcast by the BBC in the United Kingdom.[16]

The top 16 players in the latest world rankings automatically qualified for the main draw as seeded players.[17][a] Higgins was seeded first overall as the defending champion, and the remaining 15 seeds were allocated based on the latest world rankings.[17] The number of frames required to win a match increased throughout the tournament. The first round consisted of best-of-19-frames matches, with the final match being played over a maximum of 35 frames.[18] All 16 non-seeded spots in the main draw were filled with players from the qualifying rounds.[5]

Prize fundEdit

The prize fund for the championship was divided as follows:[19][20]

  • Winner: £250,000
  • Runner-up: £125,000
  • Semi-final: £52,000
  • Quarter-final: £24,050
  • Last 16: £16,000
  • Last 32: £12,000
  • Last 48: £8,200
  • Last 64: £4,600
  • Stage one highest break: £1,000
  • Stage two highest break: £10,000
  • Stage one maximum break: £1,500[21]
  • Stage two maximum break: £40,000[22]
  • Total: £1,152,500

Tournament summaryEdit

First roundEdit

 
Stephen Hendry made a maximum break in the opening round.

The first round was played from 21 to 26 April as the best of 19 frames held over two sessions.[23] Three players were making their debut at the event: Jamie Jones,[24] Cao Yupeng,[25] and Luca Brecel.[26][27][28] It was also the first time that both Cao and Brecel had qualified for the televised stage of a ranking event.[25][26] Cao and Jones advanced to the second round by defeating Mark Allen 10–6 and Shaun Murphy 10–8 respectively,[29] whilst Brecel lost 5–10 against Stephen Maguire.[30] Brecel was the youngest player ever to compete at the Crucible, aged 17 years and 45 days old.[28][30][31] He was also the first Belgian to play at the Crucible.[26]

Mark Allen, following his first-round defeat by Cao, accused his opponent of cheating. Allen claimed that Cao had not admitted to a push shot at 5–4. However, he also conceded that the Chinese player had outplayed him during the match.[32] World Snooker decided to start disciplinary action against Allen,[33] who later admitted having gone too far.[34] He was later fined a total of £11,000, and warned he would be suspended from the tour for three months if he breached the rules again in the next six months. Allen was also ordered to undergo media training.[35]

In his match against Stuart Bingham, Stephen Hendry made the 10th maximum break to be made at the event.[22] This was the 88th official maximum, and Hendry equalled two records held by Ronnie O'Sullivan: the most official maximum breaks in professional snooker (11) and the most at the venue (3).[22][36] Hendry won the match 10–4 in a rematch of one of his greatest upset defeats, in the first round of the 2000 World Snooker Championship when Hendry was defending champion and Bingham was making his television debut.[37] Zhu Ying became the first Chinese person to referee a match at the Crucible by officiating the match between Hendry and Bingham.[36] Mark Williams stated on Twitter before the championship that he hated the Crucible and wished that the tournament was played in China.[38] Williams was subsequently booed as he was announced to the crowd before his opening match,[39] and was later fined a total of £4,000.[40]

Ding Junhui and Ryan Day went to a deciding frame, which was won by Day. Ding said that the table conditions were not right and complained about spectators being disruptive during the match.[39] He was later fined £250, and warned by the chairman of the Disciplinary Committee for swearing during the live press conference.[41] In his match against Ken Doherty, Neil Robertson made three consecutive century breaks, as he completed a 10–4 victory.[42] Andrew Higginson and David Gilbert reached the second round of the event for the first time in their respective careers. Higginson defeated Stephen Lee 10–6, and Gilbert defeated Martin Gould 10–8.[43][44]

Half of the seeded players were beaten in the first round. Bingham, Graeme Dott, Murphy, Lee, Gould, Ding Junhui, Allen and Selby all lost their places in the tournament. This marked the most top 16 players to suffer defeat in the first round since 1992.[45] There was the most Asian players in the history of the event, five.[31][46]

Second roundEdit

The second round was played from 26 to 30 April, as the best of 25 frames held over three sessions.[23] Multiple time winners Higgins and Hendry had made 45 appearances at the Crucible between them, having both had played in every tournament since 1995; but this was the only time they ever met at the Crucible.[47] Higgins made the 500th century break of his career in his match against Hendry. Two frames later Hendry made his 775th.[48] Hendry defeated Higgins 13–4 to reach his 19th quarter-final at the event.[49][50] At that time only eight players had played at the Crucible at least that many times: Hendry, Steve Davis, Jimmy White, Terry Griffiths, John Parrott, Peter Ebdon, Willie Thorne and O'Sullivan.[51] Ali Carter trailed Judd Trump 9–12, but won the next four frames to win 13–12. In the deciding frame Trump needed four snookers and got three, before Carter finally potted the last remaining red ball.[52]

Crucible debutant Jones reached his first ranking event quarter-final by defeating Andrew Higginson 13–10. After the second session Jones led 10–6; before Higginson won the four opening frames of the last session to tie the score 10–10. Jones took the next three frames to win the match.[53] He became the third Welshman into this year's quarter-finals, following Day and Matthew Stevens.[54] Robertson led Gilbert 5–3 and 10–6 before winning 13–9.[55] Day defeated Cao 13–7 to reach the quarter-finals for the third time.[56] Eighth seed Maguire defeated Perry 13–7, whilst O'Sullivan defeated Williams 13–6, having won six frames in a row in the second session.[57]

Quarter-finalsEdit

 
Stephen Maguire defeated Stephen Hendry 13–2 to reach the semi-finals.

The quarter-finals were played on 1 and 2 May as the best of 25 frames, held over three sessions.[23] Hendry was defeated by Maguire with a session to spare, 13–2. Hendry won only one of the eight frames in the opening session, with Maguire winning the first four frames of the second session. Hendry won frame 13, but Maguire won the next two frames to complete the victory.[58] After the match Hendry announced his immediate retirement from professional snooker, citing dissatisfaction with his standard of play in recent years and difficulty balancing competitive, commercial and personal commitments.[59][60] Hendry would be in retirement until 2020, when he announced he would play again on the Tour,[61] playing his next professional event at the 2021 Gibraltar Open.[62]

Stevens played Day, but trailed 2–5 in the first session. He won the final frame of that session, all eight frames of the second session, and won the match 13–5 after taking the first two frames of the third session.[63] This was the first time he had reached the semi-finals since he played in the 2005 final.[64][65] Carter led 2–1 before Jones tied the scores with a break of 127.[66] However, Carter won three of the next four to lead 5–3 after the first session.[66] Jones completed back-to-back centuries in the second session, but still trailed by two frames after the second session, with Carter winning the match 13–11.[67] Robertson took a 5–3 lead over O'Sullivan after the first session of their match, but O'Sullivan won six straight frames to take a 9–7 lead after the second.[68] O'Sullivan won the match 13–10, making a further two century breaks in the final session.[68]

Semi-finalsEdit

The semi-finals were played as the best of 33 frames held over four sessions on 4 and 5 May.[23] Carter met Maguire, and led 5–3 after the first session.[69] Maguire made a 142 break in frame 15, but still trailed after the second session by four frames.[69] The pair shared the eight frames of the third session, with Carter leading 14–10. Carter then won three of the next five to win the match 17–12.[69] Earlier in the season, Carter had considered retiring from the game, due to struggles with Crohn's disease.[70][69] Hendry, acting as a pundit for BBC Sport, commented how Carter had "frustrated" Maguire during the match.[69]

O'Sullivan met Stevens in the other semi-final. This was O'Sullivan's ninth world championship semi-final, and Steven's fifth. O'Sullivan led the match 5–3 after the opening session, but won six of the eight in the second to lead 11–5.[71] The pair shared the eight frames of the third session, leaving O'Sullivan 15–9 ahead.[71] Stevens took the first frame in the fourth session, before O'Sullivan made a break of 130 in frame 26, and won the next frame to complete a 17–10 victory. Snooker pundit John Parrott likened playing O'Sullivan to be as difficult as "hold[ing] a tiger by the tail".[71]

FinalEdit

 
Ronnie O'Sullivan won the event, his fourth world championship trophy win

The final was played on 6 and 7 May as the best of 35 frames held over four sessions between Carter and O'Sullivan.[23] This was the second time that the pair had met in the final of the event, with O'Sullivan defeating Carter 18–8 in the 2008 final.[69] This was O'Sullivan's fourth world championship final, having won the prior three,[72] whilst Carter was featuring in his second.[69] Carter had never beaten O'Sullivan in 11 previous attempts in ranking events before this match.[73] O'Sullivan made two century breaks in the opening session, including a 141 break in the eighth frame, the highest in a world championship final to date.[74] The previous record was 139 made by O'Sullivan in the 2001 final.[75] The pair were tied at 3–3, but O'Sullivan won the final two frames of the session to lead 5–3.[74] O'Sullivan won four of the next six to lead 9–5, and led 10–7 overnight.[74] A break of 101 by O'Sullivan saw him lead 11–7 and he then won the next three frames to lead 14–7.[74] Carter won the next three frames, including a century break, before O'Sullivan won the final frame of the session to lead 15–10.[74] Only four frames were played in the final session, as O'Sullivan won three of them to complete a 18–11 victory.[74]

This was O'Sullivan's fourth championship, and was the oldest person to win the event since Dennis Taylor in 1985. O'Sullivan praised the work of Steve Peters, his sports psychologist, for the victory, saying: "I wouldn't have been playing if it wasn't for Steve... I've stuck in there. I've had to face things that I didn't want to face."[74] Carter would comment that his opponent was "the better man", but that he was disappointed to lose.[74] This was the twelfth meeting between the pair in ranking competitions, with O'Sullivan winning all of them.[74] Carter would eventually defeat O'Sullivan at the event in the second round of the 2018 World Snooker Championship.[76] After the event, O'Sullivan announced he would take a six months sabbatical from the sport;[77] however, he only played one competitive match before the following year's event,[78] which he also won.[79]

Main drawEdit

Shown below are the results for each round. The numbers in parentheses beside some of the players are their seeding ranks (each championship has 16 seeds and 16 qualifiers).[23] The draw for the first round took place on 16 April 2012, one day after the qualifying, and was broadcast live by Talksport.[85]

First round
Best of 19 frames
Second round
Best of 25 frames
Quarter-finals
Best of 25 frames
Semi-finals
Best of 33 frames
Final
Best of 35 frames
21 April
  John Higgins (SCO) (1)10
27 & 28 April
  Liang Wenbo (CHN) 9
  John Higgins (1) 4
21 & 22 April
  Stephen Hendry 13
  Stuart Bingham (ENG) (16) 4
1 May
  Stephen Hendry (SCO) 10
  Stephen Hendry 2
24 & 25 April
  Stephen Maguire (8) 13
  Graeme Dott (SCO) (9) 1
26, 27 & 28 April
  Joe Perry (ENG) 10
  Joe Perry 7
22 & 23 April
  Stephen Maguire (8) 13
  Stephen Maguire (SCO) (8)10
3, 4 & 5 May
  Luca Brecel (BEL) 5
  Stephen Maguire (8) 12
22 & 23 April
  Ali Carter (13)17
  Shaun Murphy (ENG) (5) 8
29 & 30 April
  Jamie Jones (WAL) 10
  Jamie Jones 13
23 & 24 April
  Andrew Higginson 10
  Stephen Lee (ENG) (12) 6
1 & 2 May
  Andrew Higginson (ENG) 10
  Jamie Jones 11
25 & 26 April
  Ali Carter (13) 13
  Ali Carter (ENG) (13)10
28, 29 & 30 April
  Mark Davis (ENG) 2
  Ali Carter (13) 13
24 & 25 April
  Judd Trump (4) 12
  Judd Trump (ENG) (4)10
6 & 7 May
  Dominic Dale (WAL) 7
  Ali Carter (13)11
25 & 26 April
  Ronnie O'Sullivan (14) 18
  Mark Williams (WAL) (3)10
28, 29 & 30 April
  Liu Chuang (CHN) 6
  Mark Williams (3) 6
23 & 24 April
  Ronnie O'Sullivan (14) 13
  Ronnie O'Sullivan (ENG) (14) 10
1 & 2 May
  Peter Ebdon (ENG) 4
  Ronnie O'Sullivan (14) 13
21 & 22 April
  Neil Robertson (6) 10
  Martin Gould (ENG) (11) 8
26 & 27 April
  David Gilbert (ENG) 10
  David Gilbert 9
21 & 22 April
  Neil Robertson (6) 13
  Neil Robertson (AUS) (6) 10
3, 4 & 5 May
  Ken Doherty (IRL) 4
  Ronnie O'Sullivan (14) 17
24 & 25 April
  Matthew Stevens (15) 10
  Ding Junhui (CHN) (7) 9
27 & 28 April
  Ryan Day (WAL) 10
  Ryan Day 13
21 & 22 April
  Cao Yupeng 7
  Mark Allen (NIR) (10) 6
1 & 2 May
  Cao Yupeng (CHN) 10
  Ryan Day 5
23 April
  Matthew Stevens (15) 13
  Matthew Stevens (WAL) (15) 10
29 & 30 April
  Marco Fu (HKG) 3
  Matthew Stevens (15) 13
24 & 25 April
  Barry Hawkins 11
  Mark Selby (ENG) (2) 3
  Barry Hawkins (ENG) 10
Final (Best of 35 frames) Crucible Theatre, Sheffield, 6 & 7 May 2012. Referee: Michaela Tabb.[86][87]
Ali Carter (13)
  England
11–18 Ronnie O'Sullivan (14)
  England
37–77, 1–121, 85–0, 58–24, 42–86, 55–2, 0–108, 0–141, 84–8, 21–73, 14–69, 62–30, 8–73, 13–60, 83–1, 34–74, 52–3, 0–101, 12–73, 48–62, 41–81, 59–9, 105–34, 62–5, 4–129, 0–92, 78–17, 0–76, 0–82 Match time: 9:08:04 (H:MM:SS)
Average frame time: 18:54 (MM:SS) Century breaks: 4
(Carter 1, O'Sullivan 3)
Highest break by Carter: 105
Highest break by O'Sullivan: 141
37–77, 1–121, 85–0, 58–24, 42–86, 55–2, 0–108, 0–141, 84–8, 21–73, 14–69, 62–30, 8–73, 13–60, 83–1, 34–74, 52–3, 0–101, 12–73, 48–62, 41–81, 59–9, 105–34, 62–5, 4–129, 0–92, 78–17, 0–76, 0–82
  Ronnie O'Sullivan wins the 2012 Betfred.com World Snooker Championship

Qualification drawEdit

Preliminary qualifyingEdit

The preliminary qualifying rounds for the tournament were for WPBSA members not on the Main Tour and took place on 5 April 2012 at the World Snooker Academy in Sheffield.[88][89][90]

Round 1

  John Parrott 0–5   Patrick Wallace
  Joe Delaney 5–4   Stephen Rowlings
  Philip Minchin 3–5   Barry Stark
  Ali Bassiri 0–5   David Singh
  Jamie O'Neill 5–4   David Gray
  Les Dodd 0–5   Justin Astley

Round 2

  Patrick Wallace 5–2   Joe Delaney
  Barry Stark 1–5   David Singh
  Stephen Ormerod 0–5   Jamie O'Neill
  Del Smith 2–5   Justin Astley

QualifyingEdit

The qualifying rounds 1–4 for the tournament that took place between 6 and 12 April 2012 at the English Institute of Sport in Sheffield. The final round of qualifying took place between 14 and 15 April 2012 at the same venue.[88][89][90] Robert Milkins made the 87th official maximum break during his round four qualifying match against Xiao Guodong on 11 April 2012. This was the second maximum break of Milkins' career.[21]

Round 1

  Igor Figueiredo 10–5   Jamie O'Neill

Rounds 2–5

Round 2
Best of 19 frames
Round 3
Best of 19 frames
Round 4
Best of 19 frames
Round 5
Best of 19 frames
  Tian Pengfei5  Anthony McGill10  Anthony Hamilton10  Ken Doherty10
  Adam Wicheard10  Adam Wicheard0  Anthony McGill8  Anthony Hamilton9
  Joe Swail5  Ben Woollaston10  Steve Davis7  Dominic Dale10
  Daniel Wells10  Daniel Wells4  Ben Woollaston10  Ben Woollaston3
  Liam Highfield10  Andy Hicks10  Jamie Jones10  Ricky Walden2
  Matthew Couch5  Liam Highfield3  Andy Hicks9  Jamie Jones10
  Andrew Pagett8  Xiao Guodong10  Robert Milkins10  Mark Davis10
  Aditya Mehta10  Aditya Mehta4  Xiao Guodong4  Robert Milkins5
  Li Yan10  James Wattana10  Gerard Greene10  Ryan Day10
  Paul Davison4  Li Yan6  James Wattana9  Gerard Greene8
  Yu Delu10  Michael White2  Matthew Selt5  Stephen Hendry10
  Patrick Wallace9  Yu Delu10  Yu Delu10  Yu Delu6
  Kurt Maflin2  Dave Harold9  Nigel Bond7  Tom Ford9
  Cao Yupeng10  Cao Yupeng10  Cao Yupeng10  Cao Yupeng10
  Andrew Norman8  Liu Song9  Joe Jogia10  Marco Fu10
  Igor Figueiredo10  Igor Figueiredo10  Igor Figueiredo7  Joe Jogia4
  Ian McCulloch2  Barry Pinches3  Michael Holt9  Mark King8
  Luca Brecel10  Luca Brecel10  Luca Brecel10  Luca Brecel10
  Sam Craigie9  Tony Drago7  Liang Wenbo10  Marcus Campbell9
  Justin Astley10  Justin Astley10  Justin Astley3  Liang Wenbo10
  David Gilbert10  Jimmy Robertson9  Mike Dunn6  Fergal O'Brien4
  Stuart Carrington7  David Gilbert10  David Gilbert10  David Gilbert10
  Rod Lawler10  Liu Chuang10  Jimmy White8  Jamie Cope7
  Dechawat Poomjaeng8  Rod Lawler7  Liu Chuang10  Liu Chuang10
  David Morris10  Mark Joyce4  Alan McManus7  Barry Hawkins10
  Kacper Filipiak2  David Morris10  David Morris10  David Morris4
  Passakorn Suwannawat10  Peter Lines10  Rory McLeod5  Andrew Higginson10
  David Singh5  Passakorn Suwannawat4  Peter Lines10  Peter Lines4
  Sam Baird8  Alfie Burden10  Jack Lisowski3  Peter Ebdon10
  David Grace10  David Grace5  Alfie Burden10  Alfie Burden0
  Adam Duffy10  Adrian Gunnell8  Jamie Burnett10  Joe Perry10
  Lucky Vatnani2  Adam Duffy10  Adam Duffy7  Jamie Burnett8

Century breaksEdit

Main stage centuriesEdit

A total of 71 century breaks were made during the main stage of the World Championship.[91][92][93] For every century break that was made during the 17-day championship in Sheffield, the title sponsor, Betfred, donated £200 to World Snooker's official charity for the 2011/2012 season, Haven House Children's Hospice, with the promise of topping it up to £25,000 if 75 centuries were made. However, Betfred boss Fred Done donated the full £25,000, despite being four centuries short of the target.[94]

Qualifying stage centuriesEdit

A total of 60 century breaks were made during the qualifying stage of the World Championship, the highest a maximum break made by Robert Milkins.[95][96]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ In the event of the defending champion being ranked outside the top 16, he would replace the player ranked world number 16 as an automatic qualifier.[17]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Why Sheffield truly is the 'home of snooker' as World Championship gets underway". thestar.co.uk. Retrieved 1 May 2020.
  2. ^ Clare, Peter (2008). "Origins of Snooker". Billiard & Snooker Heritage Collection. Archived from the original on 3 January 2017. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  3. ^ Everton, Clive (1991). Snooker and Billiards: Techniques, Tactics and Training (Crowood Sports Guides). The Crowood Press. Chapter 1. ISBN 978-1-85223-480-5
  4. ^ "The Rise Of China – World Snooker". World Snooker. 26 February 2018. Archived from the original on 19 April 2018. Retrieved 13 March 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Drawsheet". Worldsnooker.com. Archived from the original on 23 April 2012. Retrieved 20 April 2012.
  6. ^ Årdalen, Hermund. "Betfred.com World Championship Qualifiers (2012) - snooker.org". snooker.org. Archived from the original on 14 August 2021. Retrieved 14 August 2021.
  7. ^ Turner, Chris. "World Professional Championship". cajt.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk. Chris Turner's Snooker Archive. Archived from the original on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 9 February 2011.
  8. ^ "1927 World Professional Championship". globalsnookercentre.co.uk. Global Snooker Centre. Archived from the original on 10 October 2004. Retrieved 29 February 2012.
  9. ^ Historic England. "The Crucible Theatre (1392311)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 December 2013.
  10. ^ a b "talkSPORT to broadcast World Snooker Championship draw live on air". talkSPORT. Archived from the original on 14 August 2021. Retrieved 14 August 2021.
  11. ^ Gratton, Chris; Solberg, Harry Arne (11 June 2007). The Economics of Sports Broadcasting. ISBN 9781134325603. Archived from the original on 11 August 2021. Retrieved 28 June 2020 – via Google Books.
  12. ^ Ashenden, Mark (2 May 2011). "Higgins beats Trump to win fourth title". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 3 May 2011. Retrieved 2 May 2011.
  13. ^ "Tournament Calendar 2011/2012". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 4 May 2012. Retrieved 24 November 2011.
  14. ^ "World Qualifiers Draw and Format". worldsnooker.com. Retrieved 9 May 2012.
  15. ^ "History". worldsnooker.com. Archived from the original on 25 June 2008.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  16. ^ "BBC pockets snooker TV rights". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 14 August 2021. Retrieved 14 August 2021.
  17. ^ a b c Everton, Clive. "2012 World Snooker Championship". Snooker Scene. No. April 2012.
  18. ^ Årdalen, Hermund. "Betfred.com World Championship (2012) - snooker.org". snooker.org. Archived from the original on 4 May 2012. Retrieved 14 August 2021.
  19. ^ "Prize Money". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 6 April 2012. Retrieved 4 April 2012.
  20. ^ Downer, Chris (2012). Crucible Almanac. p. 130.
  21. ^ a b "Maximum Glory For Milkins". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 13 April 2012. Retrieved 11 April 2012.
  22. ^ a b c "Sensational Hendry Scores 147". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 23 April 2012. Retrieved 21 April 2012.
  23. ^ a b c d e f [80][81][82][83][84]
  24. ^ "Brilliant Jones Shocks Walden". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 17 April 2012. Retrieved 15 April 2012.
  25. ^ a b "Chinese Duo Take Crucible Spots". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 17 April 2012. Retrieved 15 April 2012.
  26. ^ a b c "A Star Is Born – Brecel Qualifies". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 17 April 2012. Retrieved 15 April 2012.
  27. ^ Goulding, Neil (20 April 2012). "Judd Trump: 'I love fast cars but please don't call me a playboy'". The Independent. London. Archived from the original on 22 April 2012. Retrieved 21 April 2012.
  28. ^ a b Downer, Chris (2012). Crucible Almanac. p. 132.
  29. ^ "Allen dumped out by Cao". Thurrock Gazette. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 22 April 2012.
  30. ^ a b "Maguire ends teenager's World Championship hopes". Irish Examiner. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 23 April 2012.
  31. ^ a b "Snooker-Boss hails record number of Asians in world championship". Eurosport UK. Archived from the original on 21 April 2014. Retrieved 21 April 2012.
  32. ^ "World Snooker Championship 2012: Mark Allen accuses Cao Yupeng of dishonesty". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  33. ^ "WPBSA Statement – Mark Allen". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  34. ^ "Mark Allen Statement". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 26 April 2012. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  35. ^ "WPBSA Statement – Mark Allen". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 16 June 2012. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  36. ^ a b "Vintage Hendry makes third Crucible 147". Eurosport UK. Archived from the original on 5 January 2013. Retrieved 21 April 2012.
  37. ^ "Stephen Hendry sets up John Higgins meeting". The Scotsman. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  38. ^ "World Snooker Championship 2012: Williams 'hates' Crucible". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 26 April 2012. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  39. ^ a b "World Snooker Championship 2012: Crowd angers beaten Ding". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  40. ^ "WPBSA Statement – Mark Williams". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 4 June 2012. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  41. ^ "WPBSA Statement – Ding Junhui". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 10 June 2012. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  42. ^ Gábor, Buzás. "Villámrajt" (in Hungarian). Eurosport Hu. Archived from the original on 21 April 2014. Retrieved 22 April 2012.
  43. ^ "Handy Andy Makes Crucible Breakthrough". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 27 April 2012. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  44. ^ "Gilbert Holds On To Beat Gould". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 1 May 2012. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  45. ^ "World Snooker Championship 2012: Ken Doherty Q&A". BBC Sport. 26 April 2012. Archived from the original on 26 April 2012. Retrieved 27 April 2012.
  46. ^ "Liang Survives Campbell Fight-Back". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 18 April 2012. Retrieved 21 April 2012.
  47. ^ "World Snooker Championship 2012: Hendry crushes Higgins". BBC Sport. 28 April 2012. Archived from the original on 4 August 2018. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  48. ^ "BBC - Ben Dirs: Was Stephen Hendry the greatest of them all?". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 21 October 2021.
  49. ^ "Hendry finishes off Higgins". Sky Sports. 28 April 2012. Archived from the original on 30 April 2012. Retrieved 28 April 2012.
  50. ^ "Snooker: Hendry quick to secure 'weird' win over Higgins". The Independent. Archived from the original on 28 August 2021. Retrieved 28 August 2021.
  51. ^ "World Snooker Championship 2012: Hendry crushes Higgins". BBC Sport. 28 April 2012. Archived from the original on 30 April 2012. Retrieved 30 April 2012.
  52. ^ "Captain Carter Leaves Trump Grounded". World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 30 April 2012. Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 30 April 2012.
  53. ^ "Jones Keeps Superb Run Going". World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 30 April 2012. Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 30 April 2012.
  54. ^ "Jones holds nerve to oust Higginson". Eurosport. 30 April 2012. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 30 April 2012.
  55. ^ "Robertson reaches quarter-finals". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 13 November 2020. Retrieved 28 August 2021.
  56. ^ "Day into last eight at the Crucible". Raidió Teilifís Éireann. 28 April 2012. Archived from the original on 16 November 2014. Retrieved 28 August 2021.
  57. ^ "Snooker: No room for sentiment when Maguire squares up to his idol Hendry". The Herald. Glasgow. Archived from the original on 28 August 2021. Retrieved 28 August 2021.
  58. ^ "Maguire in semis after Hendry win". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 23 August 2021. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  59. ^ "The Greatest". World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 2 May 2012. Archived from the original on 10 May 2012. Retrieved 19 May 2012.
  60. ^ "Hendry quits snooker after defeat". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 23 August 2021. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  61. ^ "Seven-times world champion Stephen Hendry to come out of retirement". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 4 September 2020. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  62. ^ "Gibraltar Open snooker 2021 – Stephen Hendry beaten by Matthew Selt in comeback match". Eurosport. Archived from the original on 21 April 2021. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  63. ^ "World Snooker 2012: Matthew Stevens crushes Ryan Day". BBC Sport. 2 May 2012. Archived from the original on 25 June 2012. Retrieved 12 February 2018.
  64. ^ "SNOOKER: Jones knocked out of World Championship". ITV News. Archived from the original on 23 August 2021. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  65. ^ "Ronnie O'Sullivan benefits in his World Championship semi-final from Matthew Stevens' sportsmanship". The Daily Telegraph. London. 4 May 2012. Archived from the original on 13 October 2012. Retrieved 20 September 2012.
  66. ^ a b "Jones hits fantastic 127 break". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 23 August 2021. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  67. ^ "Stevens and Carter both through". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 12 February 2021. Retrieved 25 June 2012.
  68. ^ a b "O'Sullivan moves into semi-finals". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 25 June 2012. Retrieved 25 June 2012.
  69. ^ a b c d e f g "World Snooker Championship 2012: Ali Carter beats Maguire". BBC Sport. 5 May 2012. Archived from the original on 5 May 2012. Retrieved 5 May 2012.
  70. ^ "Ali Carter considering retirement after World Snooker Championship". BBC Sport. 11 January 2012. Archived from the original on 3 April 2012. Retrieved 5 May 2012.
  71. ^ a b c "Inspired O'Sullivan reaches final". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 7 August 2021. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  72. ^ "Ronnie O'Sullivan". Betfred. Archived from the original on 9 July 2012. Retrieved 5 May 2012.
  73. ^ "World Snooker 2012: Ronnie O'Sullivan beats Matthew Stevens". BBC Sport. 5 May 2012. Archived from the original on 4 May 2012. Retrieved 5 May 2012.
  74. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Superb O'Sullivan claims fourth world title". Eurosport. 7 May 2012. Archived from the original on 9 May 2012. Retrieved 8 May 2012.
  75. ^ Downer, Chris (2012). Crucible Almanac. p. 161.
  76. ^ Hafez, Shamoon (28 April 2018). "World Snooker Championship 2018: Ronnie O'Sullivan loses to Ali Carter". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 28 April 2018. Retrieved 30 April 2018.
  77. ^ "O'Sullivan powers to world title". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 11 November 2020. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  78. ^ "Ronnie O'Sullivan returns with victory against Marcus Campbell". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 6 September 2020. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  79. ^ "O'Sullivan unsure on title defence". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 7 August 2013. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  80. ^ "2012 Betfred.com World Championship Draw". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 23 April 2012. Retrieved 20 April 2012.
  81. ^ "2012 Betfred.com World Championship Results and Report". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 20 May 2012. Retrieved 10 May 2012.
  82. ^ "Betfred.com World Championship (2012)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 4 May 2012. Retrieved 23 February 2012.
  83. ^ "World Snooker Championship 2012: scores and schedule". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 20 April 2012. Retrieved 21 April 2012.
  84. ^ Downer, Chris (2012). Crucible Almanac. pp. 74–75.
  85. ^ "TalkSPORT to Broadcast World Draw". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 4 April 2012. Retrieved 28 March 2012.
  86. ^ Downer, Chris (2012). Crucible Almanac. p. 143.
  87. ^ "Betfred.com World Championship: Final – Match 31: Allister Carter v Ronnie O'Sullivan". worldsnookerdata.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 2 March 2014. Retrieved 9 March 2013.
  88. ^ a b "2012 Betfred World Snooker Championship Qualifying Draw" (PDF). worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 23 February 2012.
  89. ^ a b "2012 Betfred World Qualifiers Results". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 26 April 2012. Retrieved 20 April 2012.
  90. ^ a b "Betfred.com World Championship Qualifiers (2012)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 16 April 2012. Retrieved 15 April 2012.
  91. ^ "Televised century breaks". worldsnookerdata.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 23 April 2012. Retrieved 20 April 2012.
  92. ^ "Crucible century breaks". Eurosport Asia. Archived from the original on 30 April 2012. Retrieved 22 April 2012.
  93. ^ Downer, Chris (2012). Crucible Almanac. p. 154.
  94. ^ "Betfred Donate To Haven House". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 11 May 2012. Retrieved 12 May 2012.
  95. ^ "Preliminary qualifying century breaks". worldsnookerdata.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 5 April 2012. Retrieved 5 April 2012.
  96. ^ "Qualifying century breaks". worldsnookerdata.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Archived from the original on 11 April 2012. Retrieved 15 April 2012.

External linksEdit