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2017 Paris–Nice
2017 UCI World Tour, race 6 of 37
Sergio Henao, who won the race by 2 seconds.
Sergio Henao, who won the race by 2 seconds.
Race details
Dates 5–12 March 2017
Stages 8
Distance 1,233.5 km (766.5 mi)
Winning time 29h 50' 29"
Results
Winner  Sergio Henao (COL) (Team Sky)
  Second  Alberto Contador (ESP) (Trek–Segafredo)
  Third  Dan Martin (IRL) (Quick-Step Floors)

Points  Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) (Quick-Step Floors)
Mountains  Lilian Calmejane (FRA) (Direct Énergie)
Youth  Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) (Quick-Step Floors)
  Team Quick-Step Floors
← 2016
2018 →

The 2017 Paris–Nice was a road cycling stage race that took place between 5 and 12 March. It was the 75th edition of the Paris–Nice and was the sixth event of the 2017 UCI World Tour.[1][2]

Team Sky won the race for the fifth time in six years, with Sergio Henao managing to fend off a final-day attack from Trek–Segafredo's Alberto Contador to win the race by just two seconds.[3] Contador had trailed by 31 seconds overnight, but had gone clear with Quick-Step Floors rider David de la Cruz and Marc Soler of the Movistar Team; after taking a couple of seconds at an intermediate sprint, Contador was beaten to the line in Nice by de la Cruz, which cost him four bonus seconds and decided the race in favour of Henao. The podium was completed by de la Cruz's teammate Dan Martin, 30 seconds in arrears of Henao.[4]

Quick-Step Floors were able to win the teams classification, with Julian Alaphilippe also finishing in the top-five overall, having held the race lead for three days during the week. Alaphilippe was the winner of the young rider classification, while four top-five stage finishes including a win in the individual time trial was also enough for him to clinch the points classification. The other jersey on offer was claimed by Direct Énergie for the second year in succession, as Lilian Calmejane won the mountains classification.[4]

Contents

TeamsEdit

As Paris–Nice was a UCI World Tour event, all eighteen UCI WorldTeams were invited automatically and obliged to enter a team in the race. Four UCI Professional Continental teams competed, completing the 22-team peloton.[5]

Just as they did in the 2016 edition of the race, Lotto–Soudal chose to compete under a different name from the rest of the season: they became Lotto Fix ALL, taking the name of a product made by Soudal, their normal sponsor. They also wore blue and white jerseys in place of their normal red and white.[6]

UCI WorldTeams

UCI Professional Continental teams

RouteEdit

The route of the 2017 Paris–Nice was announced on 3 January 2017.[7] The race started with a road stage for the first time since 2014, with a circuit race around Bois-d'Arcy in the Yvelines department. A mountain-top time trial was also scheduled for the race, but unlike previous years, it was not held on the Col d'Èze. However, it was scheduled for Mont Brouilly, a 3 km (1.9 mi)-long climb with an average gradient of 7.7%, but reaching over 9% in the final kilometre. Mont Brouilly was due to feature as a stage finish in the 2016 Paris–Nice, but the stage was ultimately cancelled due to snow.[8]

The penultimate stage was earmarked as the queen stage of the race, with two first-category climbs in the closing 40 kilometres (25 miles) of the stage – the Col Saint Martin and the stage finish at the Col de la Couillole; the finish was also the highest in the race's history, at 1,678 metres (5,505 feet) above sea level. Both mountains had previously featured during the fifteenth stage of the 1975 Tour de France,[9] when Bernard Thévenet ultimately wrested what would have been a sixth yellow jersey away from Eddy Merckx, at the finish at Pra-Loup. The final stage finished along the seafront in Nice, but not on the Promenade des Anglais as customary, as a mark of respect to the victims of the Bastille Day terrorist attack in 2016.[10] Instead, the race ended at the Quai des États-Unis.

Stage schedule[11]
Stage Date Route Distance Type Winner
1 5 March Bois-d'Arcy to Bois-d'Arcy 148.5 km (92 mi)   Flat stage   Arnaud Démare (FRA)
2 6 March Rochefort-en-Yvelines to Amilly 195 km (121 mi)   Flat stage   Sonny Colbrelli (ITA)
3 7 March Chablis to Chalon-sur-Saône 190 km (118 mi)   Hilly stage   Sam Bennett (IRL)
4 8 March Beaujeu to Mont Brouilly 14.5 km (9 mi)   Individual time trial   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)
5 9 March Quincié-en-Beaujolais to Bourg-de-Péage 199.5 km (124 mi)   Flat stage   André Greipel (GER)
6 10 March Aubagne to Fayence 193.5 km (120 mi)   Medium-mountain stage   Simon Yates (GBR)
7 11 March Nice to Col de la Couillole 177 km (110 mi)   Mountain stage   Richie Porte (AUS)
8 12 March Nice to Nice 115.5 km (72 mi)   Medium-mountain stage   David de la Cruz (ESP)

StagesEdit

Stage 1Edit

5 March 2017 — Bois-d'Arcy to Bois-d'Arcy, 148.5 km (92 mi)[12]
Result of Stage 1[13]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Arnaud Démare (FRA) FDJ 3h 22' 43"
2   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors + 0"
3   Alexander Kristoff (NOR) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 9"
4   Philippe Gilbert (BEL) Quick-Step Floors + 9"
5   Romain Hardy (FRA) Fortuneo–Vital Concept + 9"
6   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 9"
7   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 9"
8   Marco Haller (AUT) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 9"
9   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 9"
10   Rudy Molard (FRA) FDJ + 9"
General classification after Stage 1[14]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Arnaud Démare (FRA)    FDJ 3h 22' 33"
2   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)   Quick-Step Floors + 4"
3   Alexander Kristoff (NOR) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 15"
4   Philippe Gilbert (BEL) Quick-Step Floors + 16"
5   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 17"
6   Romain Hardy (FRA)   Fortuneo–Vital Concept + 18"
7   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 19"
8   Marco Haller (AUT) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 19"
9   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 19"
10   Rudy Molard (FRA) FDJ + 19"

Stage 2Edit

6 March 2017 — Rochefort-en-Yvelines to Amilly, 195 km (121 mi)[15]
Result of Stage 2[16]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Sonny Colbrelli (ITA) Bahrain–Merida 4h 20' 59"
2   John Degenkolb (GER) Trek–Segafredo + 0"
3   Arnaud Démare (FRA)   FDJ + 0"
4   Dylan Groenewegen (NED) LottoNL–Jumbo + 0"
5   Christophe Laporte (FRA) Cofidis + 0"
6   Matti Breschel (DEN) Astana + 0"
7   Oliver Naesen (BEL) AG2R La Mondiale + 0"
8   André Greipel (GER) Lotto–Soudal + 0"
9   Alexander Kristoff (NOR) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 0"
10   Evaldas Šiškevičius (LTU) Delko–Marseille Provence KTM + 0"
General classification after Stage 2[17]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Arnaud Démare (FRA)    FDJ 7h 43' 28"
2   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)   Quick-Step Floors + 6"
3   Philippe Gilbert (BEL) Quick-Step Floors + 17"
4   Alexander Kristoff (NOR) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 19"
5   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 19"
6   Romain Hardy (FRA)   Fortuneo–Vital Concept + 21"
7   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 23"
8   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 23"
9   Rudy Molard (FRA) FDJ + 23"
10   Kristijan Koren (SLO) Cannondale–Drapac + 31"

Stage 3Edit

7 March 2017 — Chablis to Chalon-sur-Saône, 190 km (118 mi)[18]
Result of Stage 3[19]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Sam Bennett (IRL) Bora–Hansgrohe 4h 31' 14"
2   Alexander Kristoff (NOR) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 0"
3   John Degenkolb (GER) Trek–Segafredo + 0"
4   Marcel Kittel (GER) Quick-Step Floors + 0"
5   Michael Matthews (AUS) Team Sunweb + 0"
6   Arnaud Démare (FRA)   FDJ + 0"
7   André Greipel (GER) Lotto–Soudal + 0"
8   Christophe Laporte (FRA) Cofidis + 0"
9   Kristian Sbaragli (ITA) Team Dimension Data + 0"
10   Magnus Cort (DEN) Orica–Scott + 0"
General classification after Stage 3[20]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Arnaud Démare (FRA)    FDJ 12h 14' 42"
2   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)   Quick-Step Floors + 6"
3   Alexander Kristoff (NOR) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 13"
4   Philippe Gilbert (BEL) Quick-Step Floors + 17"
5   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 19"
6   Romain Hardy (FRA)   Fortuneo–Vital Concept + 21"
7   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 23"
8   Rudy Molard (FRA) FDJ + 23"
9   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 23"
10   Kristijan Koren (SLO) Cannondale–Drapac + 31"

Stage 4Edit

8 March 2017 — Beaujeu to Mont Brouilly, 14.5 km (9 mi), individual time trial (ITT)[21]
Result of Stage 4[22]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)   Quick-Step Floors 21' 39"
2   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 19"
3   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 20"
4   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Movistar Team + 20"
5   Ilnur Zakarin (RUS) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 33"
6   David de la Cruz (ESP) Quick-Step Floors + 45"
7   Michael Matthews (AUS) Team Sunweb + 47"
8   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 48"
9   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 49"
10   Richie Porte (AUS) BMC Racing Team + 50"
General classification after Stage 4[23]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)     Quick-Step Floors 12h 36' 27"
2   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 33"
3   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Movistar Team + 47"
4   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 1' 05"
5   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 1' 20"
6   Philippe Gilbert (BEL) Quick-Step Floors + 1' 24"
7   Ilnur Zakarin (RUS) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 1' 28"
8   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 1' 31"
9   Rudy Molard (FRA) FDJ + 1' 32"
10   Arnaud Démare (FRA) FDJ + 1' 35"

Stage 5Edit

9 March 2017 — Quincié-en-Beaujolais to Bourg-de-Péage, 199.5 km (124 mi)[24]
Result of Stage 5[25]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   André Greipel (GER) Lotto–Soudal 4h 43' 35"
2   Arnaud Démare (FRA) FDJ + 0"
3   Dylan Groenewegen (NED) LottoNL–Jumbo + 0"
4   Michael Matthews (AUS) Team Sunweb + 0"
5   John Degenkolb (GER) Trek–Segafredo + 0"
6   Magnus Cort (DEN) Orica–Scott + 0"
7   Marcel Kittel (GER) Quick-Step Floors + 0"
8   Bryan Coquard (FRA) Direct Énergie + 0"
9   Sonny Colbrelli (ITA) Bahrain–Merida + 0"
10   Sam Bennett (IRL) Bora–Hansgrohe + 0"
General classification after Stage 5[26]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)    Quick-Step Floors 17h 20' 02"
2   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 33"
3   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Movistar Team + 47"
4   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 1' 05"
5   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 1' 20"
6   Philippe Gilbert (BEL) Quick-Step Floors + 1' 24"
7   Ilnur Zakarin (RUS) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 1' 28"
8   Arnaud Démare (FRA)   FDJ + 1' 29"
9   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 1' 31"
10   Rudy Molard (FRA) FDJ + 1' 32"

Stage 6Edit

10 March 2017 — Aubagne to Fayence, 193.5 km (120 mi)[27]
Result of Stage 6[28]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Simon Yates (GBR) Orica–Scott 4h 37' 51"
2   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 17"
3   Richie Porte (AUS) BMC Racing Team + 26"
4   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)   Quick-Step Floors + 29"
5   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 29"
6   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 32"
7   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 32"
8   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 32"
9   Ilnur Zakarin (RUS) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 32"
10   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 32"
General classification after Stage 6[29]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)    Quick-Step Floors 21h 58' 22"
2   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 36"
3   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 46"
4   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Movistar Team + 57"
5   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 1' 20"
6   Ilnur Zakarin (RUS) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 1' 31"
7   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 1' 34"
8   Simon Yates (GBR) Orica–Scott + 1' 37"
9   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 2' 04"
10   Warren Barguil (FRA) Team Sunweb + 3 '08"

Stage 7Edit

11 March 2017 — Nice to Col de la Couillole, 177 km (110 mi)[30]
Result of Stage 7[31]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Richie Porte (AUS) BMC Racing Team 5h 01' 35"
2   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 21"
3   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 32"
4   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 32"
5   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 55"
6   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 1' 07"
7   Pierre Latour (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 1' 11"
8   Ilnur Zakarin (RUS) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 1' 21"
9   Marc Soler (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 21"
10   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 21"
General classification after Stage 7[32]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Sergio Henao (COL)   Team Sky 27h 01' 15"
2   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 30"
3   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 31"
4   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 00"
5   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)    Quick-Step Floors + 1' 22"
6   Ilnur Zakarin (RUS) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 1' 34"
7   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 1' 41"
8   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 3' 22"
9   Warren Barguil (FRA) Team Sunweb + 4' 07"
10   Simon Yates (GBR) Orica–Scott + 4' 39"

Stage 8Edit

12 March 2017 — Nice to Nice, 115.5 km (72 mi)[33]
Result of Stage 8[34]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   David de la Cruz (ESP) Quick-Step Floors 2h 48' 53"
2   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 0"
3   Marc Soler (ESP) Movistar Team + 5"
4   Sonny Colbrelli (ITA) Bahrain–Merida + 21"
5   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)   Quick-Step Floors + 21"
6   Michael Matthews (AUS) Team Sunweb + 21"
7   Diego Ulissi (ITA) UAE Team Emirates + 21"
8   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Movistar Team + 21"
9   Arnold Jeannesson (FRA) Fortuneo–Vital Concept + 21"
10   Lilian Calmejane (FRA)   Direct Énergie + 21"
Final general classification[35]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Sergio Henao (COL)   Team Sky 29h 50' 29"
2   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 2"
3   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 30"
4   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 00"
5   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)    Quick-Step Floors + 1' 22"
6   Ilnur Zakarin (RUS) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 1' 34"
7   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 1' 41"
8   Warren Barguil (FRA) Team Sunweb + 4' 07"
9   Simon Yates (GBR) Orica–Scott + 4' 39"
10   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 9' 14"

Classification leadership tableEdit

The jersey winners; clockwise from upper left: Sergio Henao (yellow), Julian Alaphilippe (green & white), Lilian Calmejane (polka-dot).

In the 2017 Paris–Nice, four jerseys were awarded. The general classification was calculated by adding each cyclist's finishing times on each stage. Time bonuses were awarded to the first three finishers on all stages except for the individual time trial: the stage winner won a ten-second bonus, with six and four seconds for the second and third riders respectively. Bonus seconds were also awarded to the first three riders at intermediate sprints – three seconds for the winner of the sprint, two seconds for the rider in second and one second for the rider in third. The leader of the general classification received a yellow jersey.[36] This classification was considered the most important of the 2017 Paris–Nice, and the winner of the classification was considered the winner of the race.

Points for stage victory
Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Points awarded 15 12 9 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

The second classification was the points classification. Riders were awarded points for finishing in the top ten in a stage. Unlike in the points classification in the Tour de France, the winners of all stages were awarded the same number of points. Points were also won in intermediate sprints; three points for crossing the sprint line first, two points for second place, and one for third. The leader of the points classification was awarded a green jersey.[36]

Points for the mountains classification
Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Points for Category 1 10 8 6 4 3 2 1
Points for Category 2 7 5 3 2 1 0
Points for Category 3 4 2 1 0

There was also a mountains classification, for which points were awarded for reaching the top of a climb before other riders. Each climb was categorised as either first, second, or third-category, with more points available for the more difficult, higher-categorised climbs. For first-category climbs, the top seven riders earned points; on second-category climbs, five riders won points; on third-category climbs, only the top three riders earned points. The leadership of the mountains classification was marked by a white jersey with red polka-dots.[36]

The fourth jersey represented the young rider classification, marked by a white jersey, which was restored after not being awarded in 2016. Only riders born after 1 January 1992 were eligible; the young rider best placed in the general classification was the leader of the young rider classification.[36] There was also a classification for teams, in which the times of the best three cyclists in a team on each stage were added together; the leading team at the end of the race was the team with the lowest cumulative time.[36]

Stage Winner General classification
 
Points classification
 
Mountains classification
 
Young rider classification
 
Teams classification
1[37] Arnaud Démare Arnaud Démare Arnaud Démare[a][b][c] Romain Hardy Julian Alaphilippe[d][e] Quick-Step Floors
2[46] Sonny Colbrelli
3[47] Sam Bennett
4[48] Julian Alaphilippe Julian Alaphilippe Julian Alaphilippe[f]
5[49] André Greipel Arnaud Démare
6[50] Simon Yates Axel Domont
7[51] Richie Porte Sergio Henao Julian Alaphilippe[g] Lilian Calmejane
8[4] David de la Cruz
Final[4] Sergio Henao Julian Alaphilippe Lilian Calmejane Julian Alaphilippe Quick-Step Floors

NotesEdit

  1. ^ In stage two, Alexander Kristoff, fourth in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because Arnaud Démare wore the yellow jersey as general classification leader and second-placed Julian Alaphilippe wore the white jersey as young rider classification leader.[38] Third-placed Philippe Gilbert chose to retain his Belgian champion jersey instead of wearing the green jersey.[39]
  2. ^ In stage three, Sonny Colbrelli, second in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because Arnaud Démare continued to wear the yellow jersey as general classification leader.[40]
  3. ^ In stage four, John Degenkolb, second in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because Démare continued to wear the yellow jersey as general classification leader.[41]
  4. ^ In stages five through seven, Simon Yates, second in the young rider classification, wore the white jersey, because Julian Alaphilippe wore the yellow jersey as general classification leader.[42][43][44]
  5. ^ In stage eight, Simon Yates continued to wear the white jersey, because Julian Alaphilippe wore the green jersey as points classification leader.[45]
  6. ^ In stage five, Arnaud Démare, second in the points classification, wore the green jersey, because Julian Alaphilippe wore the yellow jersey as general classification leader.[42]
  7. ^ Julian Alaphilippe assumed the green jersey as points classification leader, after Arnaud Démare withdrew from the race during the stage.[45]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "UCI expands WorldTour to 37 events". Cycling News. Retrieved 2 October 2016. 
  2. ^ "The UCI reveals expanded UCI WorldTour calendar for 2017". UCI. Retrieved 2 October 2016. 
  3. ^ "Team Sky's Sergio Henao wins Paris-Nice by two seconds". BBC Sport. BBC. 12 March 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Henao wins Paris-Nice as Contador comes up just short". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 12 March 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  5. ^ "2017 Paris-Nice: teams selection". Paris–Nice. ASO. 26 January 2017. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 
  6. ^ "Lotto Soudal will be Lotto Fix ALL in Paris-Nice". Lotto–Soudal. Belgian Cycling Project. 28 February 2017. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 
  7. ^ Fletcher, Patrick (3 January 2017). "2017 Paris-Nice route unveiled". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 
  8. ^ "Snow forces cancellation of stage 3". Paris–Nice. ASO. 9 March 2016. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 
  9. ^ Friebe, Daniel (2013). Eddy Merckx, une vie. Racine Lannoo. ISBN 978-9401404488. 
  10. ^ "Paris-Nice 2017 route". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. 3 January 2017. 
  11. ^ "2017 Route". Paris–Nice. ASO. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 
  12. ^ "Stage 1". Paris–Nice. ASO. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 
  13. ^ Marshall-Bell, Chris (5 March 2017). "Arnaud Démare wins chaotic opening stage of Paris-Nice as big GC gaps already open up". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved 5 March 2017. 
  14. ^ "Paris-Nice: Démare claims opener as favourites stumble". VeloNews. Competitor Group, Inc. Agence France-Presse. 5 March 2017. Retrieved 5 March 2017. 
  15. ^ "Stage 2". Paris–Nice. ASO. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 
  16. ^ Coulson, Kevin (6 March 2017). "Emotional Sonny Colbrelli sprints to win in Stage Two of Paris-Nice". Eurosport. Discovery Communications. Retrieved 6 March 2017. 
  17. ^ "Colbrelli snags stage 2 win at Paris-Nice". VeloNews. Competitor Group, Inc. 6 March 2017. Retrieved 6 March 2017. 
  18. ^ "Stage 3". Paris–Nice. ASO. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 
  19. ^ "Paris-Nice: Bennett sprints to stage 3 win". VeloNews. Competitor Group, Inc. 7 March 2017. Retrieved 7 March 2017. 
  20. ^ Trancoën, Isabelle (7 March 2017). "Paris-Nice: la surprise Sam Bennett" [Paris-Nice: the surprise, Sam Bennett]. Francetv Sport (in French). France Télévisions. Retrieved 7 March 2017. 
  21. ^ "Stage 4". Paris–Nice. ASO. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 
  22. ^ Tazé-Bernard, Thierry (8 March 2017). "Paris-Nice: Alaphilippe fait coup double avec l'étape et le maillot jaune lors de la 4e étape" [Paris-Nice: Alaphilippe doubles up with stage and yellow jersey in stage 4]. Francetv Sport (in French). France Télévisions. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  23. ^ "Paris-Nice: Alaphilippe bests Contador in stage 4 TT". VeloNews. Competitor Group, Inc. 8 March 2017. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  24. ^ "Stage 5". Paris–Nice. ASO. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 
  25. ^ "Paris-Nice: Greipel wins stage 5 sprint". VeloNews. Competitor Group, Inc. 9 March 2017. Retrieved 9 March 2017. 
  26. ^ "Greipel troeft Groenewegen af in vijfde etappe Parijs-Nice" [Greipel trumps Groenewegen in fifth stage of Paris-Nice]. NU.nl (in Dutch). Sanoma. 9 March 2017. Retrieved 9 March 2017. 
  27. ^ "Stage 6". Paris–Nice. ASO. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 
  28. ^ Wynn, Nigel (10 March 2017). "Simon Yates attacks rivals to win Paris-Nice stage six". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  29. ^ "Paris-Nice, stage 6: Yates wins, Alaphilippe defends yellow". VeloNews. Competitor Group, Inc. 10 March 2017. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  30. ^ "Stage 7". Paris–Nice. ASO. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 
  31. ^ Wynn, Nigel (11 March 2017). "Richie Porte wins Paris-Nice queen stage as Sergio Henao takes overall lead". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved 11 March 2017. 
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