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2018 Paris–Nice

The 2018 Paris–Nice was a road cycling stage race that took place between 4 and 11 March 2018 in France. It was the 76th edition of the Paris–Nice and the sixth event of the 2018 UCI World Tour.[1][2]

2018 Paris–Nice
2018 UCI World Tour, race 6 of 37
Race details
Dates4–11 March 2018
Stages8
Distance1,198.9 km (745.0 mi)
Winning time30h 22' 41"
Results
Winner  Marc Soler (ESP) (Movistar Team)
  Second  Simon Yates (GBR) (Mitchelton–Scott)
  Third  Gorka Izagirre (ESP) (Bahrain–Merida)

Points  Tim Wellens (BEL) (Lotto–Soudal)
Mountains  Thomas De Gendt (BEL) (Lotto–Soudal)
Youth  Marc Soler (ESP) (Movistar Team)
  Team Bahrain–Merida
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2019 →

The race was won on the final day by the Movistar Team's Marc Soler from Spain.[3] Having started the final stage 37 seconds down on race leader Simon Yates (Mitchelton–Scott) in sixth place overall, Soler attacked around halfway into the stage along with compatriot David de la Cruz (Team Sky); the duo joined Omar Fraile (Astana) at the head of the race, and the trio managed to stay clear of the rest of the field by the time they reached Nice. As de la Cruz and Fraile contested stage honours, Soler finished third – acquiring four bonus seconds on the finish in addition to three gained at an earlier intermediate sprint – and with a 35-second gap to Yates and the remaining general classification contenders, it was enough to give Soler victory over Yates by four seconds. The podium was completed by Bahrain–Merida's Gorka Izagirre, moving ahead of teammate and brother Ion Izagirre due to bonus seconds won on the final day, 14 seconds behind Soler, who also won the white jersey as best young rider.

Lotto–Soudal won the two other jerseys on offer in the race; Tim Wellens won the green jersey for the points classification, taking five top-ten finishes over the course of the week, while Thomas De Gendt was the winner of the mountains classification. With the performances of the Izagirre brothers, Bahrain–Merida were the winners of the teams classification.

TeamsEdit

As Paris–Nice is a UCI World Tour event, all eighteen UCI WorldTeams were invited automatically and obliged to enter a team in the race. Four UCI Professional Continental teams competed, completing the 22-team peloton.[4] Paris–Nice is the first race for Groupama–FDJ under this nomenclature, as French insurance company Groupama signed a co-naming sponsorship deal with the team.[5]

UCI WorldTeams

UCI Professional Continental teams

RouteEdit

The route of the 2018 Paris–Nice was announced on 9 January 2018.[6]

Stage schedule[7]
Stage Date Route Distance Type Winner
1 4 March Chatou to Meudon 135 km (84 mi)   Hilly stage   Arnaud Démare (FRA)
2 5 March Orsonville to Vierzon 187.5 km (117 mi)   Flat stage   Dylan Groenewegen (NLD)
3 6 March Bourges to Châtel-Guyon 210 km (130 mi)   Hilly stage   Jonathan Hivert (FRA)
4 7 March La Fouillouse to Saint-Étienne 18.4 km (11 mi)   Individual time trial   Wout Poels (NED)
5 8 March Salon-de-Provence to Sisteron 165 km (103 mi)   Flat stage   Jérôme Cousin (FRA)
6 9 March Sisteron to Vence 198 km (123 mi)   Medium-mountain stage   Rudy Molard (FRA)
7 10 March Nice to Valdeblore La Colmiane 175 km (109 mi)   Mountain stage   Simon Yates (GBR)
8 11 March Nice to Nice 110 km (68 mi)   Medium-mountain stage   David de la Cruz (ESP)

StagesEdit

Stage 1Edit

4 March 2018 — Chatou to Meudon, 135 km (84 mi)[8]
Result of Stage 1[9]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Arnaud Démare (FRA) Groupama–FDJ 3h 07' 39"
2   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 0"
3   Christophe Laporte (FRA) Cofidis + 0"
4   Tim Wellens (BEL) Lotto–Soudal + 0"
5   Mike Teunissen (NED) Team Sunweb + 0"
6   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors + 0"
7   Patrick Konrad (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 2"
8   Dylan Teuns (BEL) BMC Racing Team + 2"
9   Matteo Trentin (ITA) Mitchelton–Scott + 2"
10   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 2"
General classification after Stage 1[9]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Arnaud Démare (FRA)    Groupama–FDJ 3h 07' 29"
2   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 4"
3   Christophe Laporte (FRA) Cofidis + 6"
4   Tim Wellens (BEL) Lotto–Soudal + 10"
5   Mike Teunissen (NED) Team Sunweb + 10"
6   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors + 10"
7   Patrick Konrad (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 12"
8   Dylan Teuns (BEL) BMC Racing Team + 12"
9   Matteo Trentin (ITA) Mitchelton–Scott + 12"
10   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 12"

Stage 2Edit

5 March 2018 — Orsonville to Vierzon, 187.5 km (117 mi)[10]
Result of Stage 2[11]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Dylan Groenewegen (NED) LottoNL–Jumbo 4h 51' 31"
2   Elia Viviani (ITA) Quick-Step Floors + 0"
3   André Greipel (GER) Lotto–Soudal + 0"
4   Phil Bauhaus (GER) Team Sunweb + 0"
5   Arnaud Démare (FRA)   Groupama–FDJ + 0"
6   Mike Teunissen (NED) Team Sunweb + 0"
7   Alexander Kristoff (NOR) UAE Team Emirates + 0"
8   Jempy Drucker (LUX) BMC Racing Team + 0"
9   John Degenkolb (GER) Trek–Segafredo + 0"
10   Iván García (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 0"
General classification after Stage 2[12]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Arnaud Démare (FRA)    Groupama–FDJ 7h 58' 57"
2   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 7"
3   Christophe Laporte (FRA) Cofidis + 8"
4   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors + 10"
5   Mike Teunissen (NED) Team Sunweb + 13"
6   Tim Wellens (BEL) Lotto–Soudal + 13"
7   Tony Gallopin (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 15"
8   Esteban Chaves (COL) Mitchelton–Scott + 15"
9   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 15"
10   Heinrich Haussler (AUS) Bahrain–Merida + 15"

Stage 3Edit

6 March 2018 — Bourges to Châtel-Guyon, 210 km (130 mi)[13]
Result of Stage 3[14]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Jonathan Hivert (FRA) Direct Énergie 5h 22' 49"
2   Luis León Sánchez (ESP) Astana + 1"
3   Rémy Di Gregorio (FRA) Delko–Marseille Provence KTM + 1"
4   Arnaud Démare (FRA)   Groupama–FDJ + 38"
5   Mike Teunissen (NED) Team Sunweb + 38"
6   André Greipel (GER) Lotto–Soudal + 38"
7   Magnus Cort (DEN) Astana + 38"
8   Matteo Trentin (ITA) Mitchelton–Scott + 38"
9   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors + 38"
10   Felix Großschartner (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 38"
General classification after Stage 3[15]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Luis León Sánchez (ESP)   Astana 13h 21' 56"
2   Arnaud Démare (FRA)   Groupama–FDJ + 28"
3   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 35"
4   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors + 38"
5   Mike Teunissen (NED) Team Sunweb + 41"
6   Tim Wellens (BEL) Lotto–Soudal + 41"
7   Roman Kreuziger (CZE) Mitchelton–Scott + 41"
8   Heinrich Haussler (AUS) Bahrain–Merida + 43"
9   Felix Großschartner (AUT)   Bora–Hansgrohe + 43"
10   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 43"

Stage 4Edit

7 March 2018 — La Fouillouse to Saint-Étienne, 18.4 km (11 mi), individual time trial (ITT)[16]
Result of Stage 4[17]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Wout Poels (NED) Team Sky 25' 33"
2   Marc Soler (ESP) Movistar Team + 11"
3   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors + 16"
4   Felix Großschartner (AUT)   Bora–Hansgrohe + 20"
5   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 27"
6   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 27"
7   Luis León Sánchez (ESP)   Astana + 28"
8   Tim Wellens (BEL) Lotto–Soudal + 29"
9   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 33"
10   Esteban Chaves (COL) Mitchelton–Scott + 33"
General classification after Stage 4[18]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Luis León Sánchez (ESP)   Astana 13h 47' 57"
2   Wout Poels (NED) Team Sky + 15"
3   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors + 26"
4   Marc Soler (ESP)   Movistar Team + 26"
5   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 34"
6   Felix Großschartner (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 35"
7   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 42"
8   Tim Wellens (BEL) Lotto–Soudal + 42"
9   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 48"
10   Esteban Chaves (COL) Mitchelton–Scott + 48"

Stage 5Edit

8 March 2018 — Salon-de-Provence to Sisteron, 165 km (103 mi)[19]
Result of Stage 5[20]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Jérôme Cousin (FRA) Direct Énergie 3h 57' 25"
2   Nils Politt (GER) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 2"
3   André Greipel (GER) Lotto–Soudal + 4"
4   Magnus Cort (DEN) Astana + 4"
5   Alexander Kristoff (NOR) UAE Team Emirates + 4"
6   Christophe Laporte (FRA) Cofidis + 4"
7   Matteo Trentin (ITA) Mitchelton–Scott + 4"
8   Mike Teunissen (NED) Team Sunweb + 4"
9   Matti Breschel (DEN) EF Education First–Drapac p/b Cannondale + 4"
10   Koen de Kort (NED) Trek–Segafredo + 4"
General classification after Stage 5[21]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Luis León Sánchez (ESP)   Astana 17h 45' 26"
2   Wout Poels (NED) Team Sky + 15"
3   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors + 26"
4   Marc Soler (ESP)   Movistar Team + 26"
5   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 34"
6   Felix Großschartner (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 35"
7   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 42"
8   Tim Wellens (BEL) Lotto–Soudal + 42"
9   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 48"
10   Esteban Chaves (COL) Mitchelton–Scott + 48"

Stage 6Edit

9 March 2018 — Sisteron to Vence, 198 km (123 mi)[22]
Result of Stage 6[23]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Rudy Molard (FRA) Groupama–FDJ 4h 40' 05"
2   Tim Wellens (BEL) Lotto–Soudal + 2"
3   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors + 2"
4   Luis León Sánchez (ESP)   Astana + 2"
5   Sam Oomen (NED) Team Sunweb + 2"
6   Dylan Teuns (BEL) BMC Racing Team + 2"
7   Patrick Konrad (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 2"
8   Esteban Chaves (COL) Mitchelton–Scott + 2"
9   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 2"
10   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 2"
General classification after Stage 6[24]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Luis León Sánchez (ESP)   Astana 22h 25' 33"
2   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors + 22"
3   Marc Soler (ESP)   Movistar Team + 26"
4   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 34"
5   Tim Wellens (BEL) Lotto–Soudal + 35"
6   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 42"
7   Simon Yates (GBR) Mitchelton–Scott + 45"
8   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 46"
9   Esteban Chaves (COL) Mitchelton–Scott + 48"
10   Patrick Konrad (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 54"

Stage 7Edit

10 March 2018 — Nice to Valdeblore La Colmiane, 175 km (109 mi)[25]
Result of Stage 7[26]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Simon Yates (GBR) Mitchelton–Scott 5h 02' 54"
2   Dylan Teuns (BEL) BMC Racing Team + 8"
3   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 8"
4   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 13"
5   Tim Wellens (BEL) Lotto–Soudal + 13"
6   Patrick Konrad (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 20"
7   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 46"
8   Marc Soler (ESP)   Movistar Team + 46"
9   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 48"
10   Sam Oomen (NED) Team Sunweb + 54"
General classification after Stage 7[27]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Simon Yates (GBR)   Mitchelton–Scott 27h 29' 02"
2   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 11"
3   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 12"
4   Tim Wellens (BEL)   Lotto–Soudal + 13"
5   Dylan Teuns (BEL) BMC Racing Team + 27"
6   Marc Soler (ESP)   Movistar Team + 37"
7   Patrick Konrad (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 39"
8   Sergio Henao (COL) Team Sky + 57"
9   Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors + 1' 48"
10   Alexis Vuillermoz (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 1' 49"

Stage 8Edit

11 March 2018 — Nice to Nice, 110 km (68 mi)[28]
Result of Stage 8[29]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   David de la Cruz (ESP) Team Sky 2h 53' 06"
2   Omar Fraile (ESP) Astana + 0"
3   Marc Soler (ESP)   Movistar Team + 3"
4   Patrick Konrad (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 38"
5   Tim Wellens (BEL)   Lotto–Soudal + 38"
6   Simon Yates (GBR)   Mitchelton–Scott + 38"
7   Dylan Teuns (BEL) BMC Racing Team + 38"
8   Richard Carapaz (ECU) Movistar Team + 38"
9   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 38"
10   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 38"
Final general classification[29]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Marc Soler (ESP)    Movistar Team 30h 22' 41"
2   Simon Yates (GBR) Mitchelton–Scott + 4"
3   Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 14"
4   Ion Izagirre (ESP) Bahrain–Merida + 16"
5   Tim Wellens (BEL)   Lotto–Soudal + 16"
6   Dylan Teuns (BEL) BMC Racing Team + 32"
7   Patrick Konrad (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 44"
8   Alexis Vuillermoz (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 1' 54"
9   David de la Cruz (ESP) Team Sky + 2' 15"
10   Felix Großschartner (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 2' 35"

Classification leadership tableEdit

In the 2018 Paris–Nice, four jerseys were awarded. The general classification was calculated by adding each cyclist's finishing times on each stage. Time bonuses were awarded to the first three finishers on all stages except for the individual time trial: the stage winner won a ten-second bonus, with six and four seconds for the second and third riders respectively. Bonus seconds were also awarded to the first three riders at intermediate sprints – three seconds for the winner of the sprint, two seconds for the rider in second and one second for the rider in third. The leader of the general classification received a yellow jersey.[30] This classification was considered the most important of the 2018 Paris–Nice, and the winner of the classification was considered the winner of the race.

Points for stage victory
Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Points awarded 15 12 9 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

The second classification was the points classification. Riders were awarded points for finishing in the top ten in a stage. Unlike in the points classification in the Tour de France, the winners of all stages were awarded the same number of points. Points were also won in intermediate sprints; three points for crossing the sprint line first, two points for second place, and one for third. The leader of the points classification was awarded a green jersey.[30]

Points for the mountains classification
Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Points for Category 1 10 8 6 4 3 2 1
Points for Category 2 7 5 3 2 1 0
Points for Category 3 4 2 1 0

There was also a mountains classification, for which points were awarded for reaching the top of a climb before other riders. Each climb was categorised as either first, second, or third-category, with more points available for the more difficult, higher-categorised climbs. For first-category climbs, the top seven riders earned points; on second-category climbs, five riders won points; on third-category climbs, only the top three riders earned points. The leadership of the mountains classification was marked by a white jersey with red polka-dots.[30]

The fourth jersey represented the young rider classification, marked by a white jersey. Only riders born after 1 January 1993 were eligible; the young rider best placed in the general classification was the leader of the young rider classification.[30] There was also a classification for teams, in which the times of the best three cyclists in a team on each stage were added together; the leading team at the end of the race was the team with the lowest cumulative time.[30]

Stage Winner General classification
 
Points classification
 
Mountains classification
 
Young rider classification
 
Teams classification
1[9] Arnaud Démare Arnaud Démare Arnaud Démare Pierre-Luc Périchon Felix Großschartner Bahrain–Merida
2[31] Dylan Groenewegen Marc Soler
3[32] Jonathan Hivert Luis León Sánchez Felix Großschartner
4[33] Wout Poels Marc Soler Team Sky
5[34] Jérôme Cousin Jérôme Cousin
6[35] Rudy Molard Fabien Grellier Mitchelton–Scott
7[36] Simon Yates Simon Yates Tim Wellens Thomas De Gendt
8[29] David de la Cruz Marc Soler Bahrain–Merida
Final[29] Marc Soler[37] Tim Wellens[38] Thomas De Gendt[39] Marc Soler[40] Bahrain–Merida[41]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "UCI announces 2018 road calendar". Cycling News. Retrieved 20 October 2017.
  2. ^ "2018 UCI WorldTour calendar unveiled". Velon. Archived from the original on 25 September 2017. Retrieved 20 October 2016.
  3. ^ Windsor, Richard (11 March 2018). "Marc Soler grabs Paris-Nice title by four seconds from Simon Yates on final stage". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  4. ^ Robertshaw, Henry (8 January 2018). "Race organisers reveal wildcard team selections for 2018 Tour de France". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved 2 March 2018. All four places at Paris-Nice will go to French teams, with Cofidis, Delko Marseille-Provence KTM, Direct Energie, and Fortuneo-Samsic securing a spot in the Race to the Sun [...]
  5. ^ Robertshaw, Henry (31 January 2018). "Groupama-FDJ reveal new kit for 2018 season". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved 2 March 2018. The team will debut its new kit and its new name at Paris-Nice, which starts in Chatou on March 4.
  6. ^ "2018 Paris-Nice route includes 18km TT and intense finale". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 9 January 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  7. ^ "Route 2018". Paris–Nice. ASO. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
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  9. ^ a b c "Paris-Nice: Démare wins rainy opening stage in photo finish". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 4 March 2018. Retrieved 4 March 2018.
  10. ^ "Orsonville / Vierzon". Paris–Nice. ASO. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
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  12. ^ "Classement général étape 2" [Stage 2 General Classification]. Tissot Timing (in French). Swiss Timing Ltd. 5 March 2018. Retrieved 5 March 2018.
  13. ^ "Bourges / Châtel-Guyon". Paris–Nice. ASO. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
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  16. ^ "La Fouillouse / Saint-Etienne". Paris–Nice. ASO. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
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  22. ^ "Sisteron / Vence". Paris–Nice. ASO. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
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  24. ^ "Classement général étape 6" [Stage 6 General Classification]. Tissot Timing (in French). Swiss Timing Ltd. 9 March 2018. Retrieved 10 March 2018.
  25. ^ "Nice / Valdeblore La Colmiane". Paris–Nice. ASO. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  26. ^ "Classement de l'étape 7" [Stage 7 Classification]. Tissot Timing (in French). Swiss Timing Ltd. 10 March 2018. Retrieved 10 March 2018.
  27. ^ "Classement général étape 7" [Stage 7 General Classification]. Tissot Timing (in French). Swiss Timing Ltd. 10 March 2018. Retrieved 10 March 2018.
  28. ^ "Nice / Nice". Paris–Nice. ASO. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  29. ^ a b c d "Marc Soler wins Paris-Nice". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 11 March 2018. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  30. ^ a b c d e "2018 Paris–Nice: Regulations" (PDF). Paris–Nice. Amaury Sport Organisation. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  31. ^ Ryan, Barry (5 March 2018). "Paris-Nice: Groenewegen wins stage 2". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 5 March 2018.
  32. ^ Fletcher, Patrick (6 March 2018). "Paris-Nice: Hivert wins stage 3". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  33. ^ Ryan, Barry (7 March 2018). "Paris-Nice: Poels wins stage 4 time trial". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  34. ^ "Paris-Nice: Cousin wins stage 5 in Sisteron". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 8 March 2018. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  35. ^ "Paris-Nice: Molard surprises on stage 6 in Vence". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 9 March 2018. Retrieved 10 March 2018.
  36. ^ "Simon Yates wins Paris-Nice stage 7". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 10 March 2018. Retrieved 10 March 2018.
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  41. ^ "Classement par équipes 8" [Teams Classification 8]. Tissot Timing (in French). Swiss Timing Ltd. 11 March 2018. Retrieved 11 March 2018.

External linksEdit