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The 2000–01 FA Premier League (known as the FA Carling Premiership for sponsorship reasons) was the third season running which ended with Manchester United as champions and Arsenal as runners-up. Sir Alex Ferguson became the first manager to win three successive English league titles with the same club. Liverpool, meanwhile, managed a unique cup treble – winning the FA Cup, League Cup and UEFA Cup. They also finished third in the Premier League and qualified for the Champions League; they had not played in the European Cup since the 1985 final at Heysel in which their fans were found responsible for the deaths of 39 spectators, and were given a six-year ban from European competition. Nike replaced Mitre as manufacturer of the official Premier League match ball until the end of 2024-25 season.

FA Premier League
Season2000–01
Dates19 August 2000–19 May 2001
ChampionsManchester United
7th Premier League title
14th English title
RelegatedManchester City
Coventry City
Bradford City
Champions LeagueManchester United
Arsenal
Liverpool
UEFA CupLeeds United
Ipswich Town
Chelsea
Intertoto CupAston Villa
Newcastle United
Matches played380
Goals scored992 (2.61 per match)
Top goalscorerJimmy Floyd Hasselbaink (23)
Biggest home winManchester United 6–0 Bradford City
(5 September 2000)
Biggest away winCharlton Athletic 0–4 Liverpool
(19 May 2001)
Manchester City 0–4 Arsenal
(11 April 2001)
Derby County 0–4 Chelsea
(7 April 2001)
Manchester City 0–4 Leeds United
(13 January 2001)
Derby County 0–4 Liverpool
(15 October 2000)
Highest scoringArsenal 5–3 Charlton Athletic
(26 August 2000)
Longest winning run8 games[1]
Manchester United
Longest unbeaten run13 games[1]
Leeds United
Longest winless run13 games[1]
Bradford City
Derby County
Longest losing run8 games[1]
Leicester City
Highest attendance67,637
Manchester United v Coventry City
(14 April 2001)
Lowest attendance15,523
Bradford City v Coventry City
(2 December 2000)
Average attendance32,905

UEFA Cup places went to Leeds United, Chelsea, Ipswich Town, and Aston Villa, who qualified via the Intertoto Cup. None of the top six clubs in the Premier League had an English manager. The most successful English manager in the 2000–01 Premier League campaign was Peter Reid, whose Sunderland side finished seventh, having spent most of the season challenging for a place in Europe, and briefly occupied second place in the Premier League table.

Despite the success achieved by Sir Alex Ferguson and Gérard Houllier, the Manager of the Year Award went to George Burley. The Ipswich Town manager was in charge of a newly promoted side who began the season as relegation favourites and on a limited budget, guided his team to fifth place in the Premier League final table and a place in the UEFA Cup for the first time in almost 20 years. 2000–01 was perhaps the best season yet for newly promoted teams in the Premier League. Charlton Athletic finished ninth, their highest finish since the 1950s. The only newly promoted team to suffer relegation was Manchester City, who in the space of six seasons had now been relegated three times and promoted twice. Relegated in bottom place were Bradford City, whose return to the top division after almost 80 years was over after just two seasons. The next relegation place went to Coventry City, who were finally relegated after 34 successive seasons of top division football, which had brought numerous relegation battles and league finishes no higher than sixth place.

Contents

TeamsEdit

Twenty teams competed in the league – the top seventeen teams from the previous season and the three teams promoted from the First Division. The promoted teams were Charlton Athletic, Manchester City and Ipswich Town, returning after a top flight absence of one, four and five years respectively. They replaced Wimbledon, Sheffield Wednesday and Watford. Wimbledon and Sheffield Wednesday were relegated after spending fourteen and nine years in the top flight respectively while Watford were immediately relegated to the First Division after spending just one season in the top flight.

Stadiums and LocationsEdit

Greater London Premier League football clubs
Team Location Stadium Capacity
Arsenal London (Highbury) Arsenal Stadium 38,419
Aston Villa Birmingham Villa Park 42,573
Bradford City Bradford Valley Parade 25,136
Charlton Athletic London (Charlton) The Valley 27,111
Chelsea London (Fulham) Stamford Bridge 42,055
Coventry City Coventry Highfield Road 23,489
Derby County Derby Pride Park Stadium 33,597
Everton Liverpool (Walton) Goodison Park 40,569
Ipswich Town Ipswich Portman Road 30,300
Leeds United Leeds Elland Road 40,242
Leicester City Leicester Filbert Street 22,000
Liverpool Liverpool (Anfield) Anfield 45,522
Manchester City Manchester Maine Road 35,150
Manchester United Old Trafford Old Trafford 68,174
Middlesbrough Middlesbrough Riverside Stadium 35,049
Newcastle United Newcastle upon Tyne St James' Park 52,387
Southampton Southampton The Dell[a] 15,200
Sunderland Sunderland Stadium of Light 49,000
Tottenham Hotspur London (Tottenham) White Hart Lane 36,240
West Ham United London (Upton Park) Boleyn Ground 35,647
  1. ^ This was Southampton's last season at The Dell as they were scheduled to relocate to St Mary's Stadium from the following season onward.

Personnel and kitsEdit

(as of 14 May 2001)

Team Manager Captain Kit manufacturer Shirt sponsor
Arsenal   Arsène Wenger   Tony Adams Nike Dreamcast
Aston Villa   John Gregory   Gareth Southgate Diadora NTL
Bradford City   Jim Jefferies   Stuart McCall Asics JCT600 Ltd
Charlton Athletic   Alan Curbishley   Mark Kinsella Le Coq Sportif Redbus
Chelsea   Claudio Ranieri   Marcel Desailly Umbro Autoglass
Coventry City   Gordon Strachan   Mustapha Hadji CCFC Garments Subaru
Derby County   Jim Smith   Darryl Powell Puma EDS
Everton   Walter Smith   Dave Watson Puma One2One
Ipswich Town   George Burley   Matt Holland Punch Greene King
Leeds United   David O'Leary   Lucas Radebe Nike Strongbow
Leicester City   Peter Taylor   Matt Elliott Le Coq Sportif Walkers Crisps
Liverpool   Gérard Houllier   Jamie Redknapp Reebok Carlsberg Group
Manchester City   Joe Royle   Alf-Inge Håland Le Coq Sportif Eidos
Manchester United   Sir Alex Ferguson   Roy Keane Umbro Vodafone
Middlesbrough   Terry Venables
  Bryan Robson
  Paul Ince Erreà BT Cellnet
Newcastle United   Bobby Robson   Alan Shearer Adidas Newcastle Brown Ale
Southampton   Stuart Gray   Matt Le Tissier Saints Friends Provident
Sunderland   Peter Reid   Michael Gray Nike Reg Vardy
Tottenham Hotspur   Glenn Hoddle   Sol Campbell Adidas Holsten
West Ham United   Glenn Roeder   Steve Lomas Fila Dr. Martens

Managerial changesEdit

Team Outgoing manager Manner of departure Date of vacancy Position in table Incoming manager Date of appointment
Leicester City   Martin O'Neill End of contract 1 June 2000 Pre-season   Peter Taylor 12 June 2000
Bradford City   Paul Jewell Signed by Sheffield Wednesday 18 June 2000   Chris Hutchings 18 June 2000[2]
Chelsea   Gianluca Vialli Sacked 12 September 2000 10th   Claudio Ranieri 17 September 2000
Bradford City   Chris Hutchings 6 November 2000[3] 19th   Jim Jefferies 20 November 2000[4]
Tottenham Hotspur   George Graham 16 March 2001[5] 13th   Glenn Hoddle 30 March 2001[6]
Southampton   Glenn Hoddle Signed by Tottenham Hotspur 30 March 2001[6] 9th   Stuart Gray 30 March 2001
West Ham United   Harry Redknapp Sacked 9 May 2001 14th   Glenn Roeder 14 June 2001[7]

League tableEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
1 Manchester United (C) 38 24 8 6 79 31 +48 80 Qualification for the Champions League first group stage
2 Arsenal 38 20 10 8 63 38 +25 70
3 Liverpool 38 20 9 9 71 39 +32 69 Qualification for the Champions League third qualifying round[a]
4 Leeds United 38 20 8 10 64 43 +21 68 Qualification for the UEFA Cup first round[a]
5 Ipswich Town 38 20 6 12 57 42 +15 66
6 Chelsea 38 17 10 11 68 45 +23 61
7 Sunderland 38 15 12 11 46 41 +5 57
8 Aston Villa 38 13 15 10 46 43 +3 54 Qualification for the Intertoto Cup third round
9 Charlton Athletic 38 14 10 14 50 57 −7 52
10 Southampton 38 14 10 14 40 48 −8 52
11 Newcastle United 38 14 9 15 44 50 −6 51 Qualification for the Intertoto Cup third round
12 Tottenham Hotspur 38 13 10 15 47 54 −7 49
13 Leicester City 38 14 6 18 39 51 −12 48
14 Middlesbrough 38 9 15 14 44 44 0 42
15 West Ham United 38 10 12 16 45 50 −5 42
16 Everton 38 11 9 18 45 59 −14 42
17 Derby County 38 10 12 16 37 59 −22 42
18 Manchester City (R) 38 8 10 20 41 65 −24 34 Relegation to the Football League First Division
19 Coventry City (R) 38 8 10 20 36 63 −27 34
20 Bradford City (R) 38 5 11 22 30 70 −40 26
Source: Premier League
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Since Liverpool won the League Cup and qualified for the Champions League, their UEFA Cup place went to fifth-placed Ipswich Town. Since both FA Cup finalists, Liverpool and Arsenal, qualified for the Champions League, the berth in the UEFA Cup went to sixth-placed Chelsea. Both Ipswich and Chelsea were the highest-ranked team not already qualified for a European competition.

ResultsEdit

Home \ Away ARS AST BRA CHA CHE COV DER EVE IPS LEE LEI LIV MCI MUN MID NEW SOU SUN TOT WHU
Arsenal 1–0 2–0 5–3 1–1 2–1 0–0 4–1 1–0 2–1 6–1 2–0 5–0 1–0 0–3 5–0 1–0 2–2 2–0 3–0
Aston Villa 0–0 2–0 2–1 1–1 3–2 4–1 2–1 2–1 1–2 2–1 0–3 2–2 0–1 1–1 1–1 0–0 0–0 2–0 2–2
Bradford City 1–1 0–3 2–0 2–0 2–1 2–0 0–1 0–2 1–1 0–0 0–2 2–2 0–3 1–1 2–2 0–1 1–4 3–3 1–2
Charlton Athletic 1–0 3–3 2–0 2–0 2–2 2–1 1–0 2–1 1–2 2–0 0–4 4–0 3–3 1–0 2–0 1–1 0–1 1–0 1–1
Chelsea 2–2 1–0 3–0 0–1 6–1 4–1 2–1 4–1 1–1 0–2 3–0 2–1 1–1 2–1 3–1 1–0 2–4 3–0 4–2
Coventry City 0–1 1–1 0–0 2–2 0–0 2–0 1–3 0–1 0–0 1–0 0–2 1–1 1–2 1–3 0–2 1–1 1–0 2–1 0–3
Derby County 1–2 1–0 2–0 2–2 0–4 1–0 1–0 1–1 1–1 2–0 0–4 1–1 0–3 3–3 2–0 2–2 1–0 2–1 0–0
Everton 2–0 0–1 2–1 3–0 2–1 1–2 2–2 0–3 2–2 2–1 2–3 3–1 1–3 2–2 1–1 1–1 2–2 0–0 1–1
Ipswich Town 1–1 1–2 3–1 2–0 2–2 2–0 0–1 2–0 1–2 2–0 1–1 2–1 1–1 2–1 1–0 3–1 1–0 3–0 1–1
Leeds United 1–0 1–2 6–1 3–1 2–0 1–0 0–0 2–0 1–2 3–1 4–3 1–2 1–1 1–1 1–3 2–0 2–0 4–3 0–1
Leicester City 0–0 0–0 1–2 3–1 2–1 1–3 2–1 1–1 2–1 3–1 2–0 1–2 0–3 0–3 1–1 1–0 2–0 4–2 2–1
Liverpool 4–0 3–1 1–0 3–0 2–2 4–1 1–1 3–1 0–1 1–2 1–0 3–2 2–0 0–0 3–0 2–1 1–1 3–1 3–0
Manchester City 0–4 1–3 2–0 1–4 1–2 1–2 0–0 5–0 2–3 0–4 0–1 1–1 0–1 1–1 0–1 0–1 4–2 0–1 1–0
Manchester United 6–1 2–0 6–0 2–1 3–3 4–2 0–1 1–0 2–0 3–0 2–0 0–1 1–1 2–1 2–0 5–0 3–0 2–0 3–1
Middlesbrough 0–1 1–1 2–2 0–0 1–0 1–1 4–0 1–2 1–2 1–2 0–3 1–0 1–1 0–2 1–3 0–1 0–0 1–1 2–1
Newcastle United 0–0 3–0 2–1 0–1 0–0 3–1 3–2 0–1 2–1 2–1 1–0 2–1 0–1 1–1 1–2 1–1 1–2 2–0 2–1
Southampton 3–2 2–0 2–0 0–0 3–2 1–2 1–0 1–0 0–3 1–0 1–0 3–3 0–2 2–1 1–3 2–0 0–1 2–0 2–3
Sunderland 1–0 1–1 0–0 3–2 1–0 1–0 2–1 2–0 4–1 0–2 0–0 1–1 1–0 0–1 1–0 1–1 2–2 2–3 1–1
Tottenham Hotspur 1–1 0–0 2–1 0–0 0–3 3–0 3–1 3–2 3–1 1–2 3–0 2–1 0–0 3–1 0–0 4–2 0–0 2–1 1–0
West Ham United 1–2 1–1 1–1 5–0 0–2 1–1 3–1 0–2 0–1 0–2 0–1 1–1 4–1 2–2 1–0 1–0 3–0 0–2 0–0
Source:[citation needed]
Colours: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.

Top scorersEdit

Rank Scorer Club Goals
1 Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink Chelsea 23
2 Marcus Stewart Ipswich Town 19
3 Thierry Henry Arsenal 17
Mark Viduka Leeds United 17
5 Michael Owen Liverpool 16
6 Teddy Sheringham Manchester United 15
7 Emile Heskey Liverpool 14
Kevin Phillips Sunderland 14
9 Alen Bokšić Middlesbrough 12
10 James Beattie Southampton 11
Jonatan Johansson Charlton Athletic 11
Frédéric Kanouté West Ham United 11
Gustavo Poyet Chelsea 11
Alan Smith Leeds United 11

OverallEdit

AwardsEdit

Monthly awardsEdit

Month Manager of the Month Player of the Month
August Bobby Robson (Newcastle United) Alan Smith (Leeds United)
September Peter Taylor (Leicester City) Tim Flowers (Leicester City)
October Arsène Wenger (Arsenal) Teddy Sheringham (Manchester United)
November George Burley (Ipswich Town) Paul Robinson (Leeds United)
December Peter Reid (Sunderland) James Beattie (Southampton)
January Terry Venables (Middlesbrough) Robbie Keane (Leeds United)
February Alex Ferguson (Manchester United) Stuart Pearce (West Ham United)
March David O'Leary (Leeds United) Steven Gerrard (Liverpool)
April David O'Leary (Leeds United) Gary McAllister (Liverpool)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "English Premier League 2000–01". statto.com. Retrieved 13 March 2015.
  2. ^ "Hutchings appointed new Bantams boss". BBC Sport. 22 June 2000. Retrieved 2007-05-14.
  3. ^ "Bradford sack Hutchings". BBC Sport. 6 November 2000. Retrieved 2007-05-14.
  4. ^ "Jefferies is new Bradford manager". BBC Sport. 20 November 2000.
  5. ^ "Graham sacked by Tottenham". BBC Sport. 16 March 2001. Retrieved 26 January 2011.
  6. ^ a b "Hoddle confirmed new Spurs boss". BBC Sport. 30 March 2001. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  7. ^ "Roeder confirmed as West Ham boss". BBC Sport. BBC. 14 June 2001. Archived from the original on 22 May 2009. Retrieved 18 November 2007.

External linksEdit