1989 Ice Hockey World Championships

The 1989 Ice Hockey World Championships took place in Sweden from 15 April – 1 May. The games were played in Södertälje and Stockholm, in the newly built arena Globen. Eight teams took part, and each team played each other once. The four best teams then played each other again. This was the 53rd World Championships, and also the 64th European Championships. The Soviet Union became world champions for the 21st time, and also European champions for the 26th time.

1989 Ice Hockey World Championships
Tournament details
Host country Sweden
Dates15 April – 1 May
Teams8
Venue(s)2 (in 2 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg Soviet Union (21st title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg Canada
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg Czechoslovakia
Fourth place Sweden
Tournament statistics
Matches played40
Goals scored282 (7.05 per match)
Attendance388,563 (9,714 per match)
Scoring leader(s)Canada Brian Bellows 14 points
1987
1990

The tournament was marred by positive drug tests. Only the goal totals of the Americans were affected in the end. Their losses against the Czechoslovaks and the Canadians were ruled as shutouts because of Corey Millen's high testosterone levels. Canadian Randy Carlyle also came under suspicion, but his A and B samples did not match, and he was cleared of wrongdoing.[1][2] The Soviet team won all ten of their games.

At the end of the tournament, Soviet star Alexander Mogilny defected to the United States by getting on a plane with two Buffalo Sabres executives. The Sabres had drafted Mogilny the year before.[3] He joined the team and went on to score 1032 points in his NHL career.

World Championship Group A (Sweden)Edit

First roundEdit

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1   Soviet Union 7 7 0 0 36 - 12 14
2   Sweden 7 4 2 1 29 - 20 10
3   Canada 7 5 0 2 45 - 18 10
4   Czechoslovakia 7 3 2 2 33 - 15 8
5   Finland 7 2 1 4 22 - 25 5
6   United States 7 2 1 4 20 - 29 5
7   Poland 7 1 0 6 10 - 59 2
8   West Germany 7 0 2 5 17 - 34 2
15 AprilCanada  6-4  Finland
15 AprilCzechoslovakia  3-3  West Germany
15 AprilSoviet Union  4-2  United States
15 AprilSweden  5-1  Poland
16 AprilCanada  11-0  Poland
16 AprilSweden  4-2  United States
16 AprilCzechoslovakia  3-1  Finland
16 AprilSoviet Union  5-1  West Germany
18 AprilCanada  8-0  United States
18 AprilCzechoslovakia  15-0  Poland
18 AprilSoviet Union  4-1  Finland
18 AprilSweden  3-3  West Germany
19 AprilCanada  8-2  West Germany
19 AprilSoviet Union  12-1  Poland
19 AprilCzechoslovakia  5-0  United States
19 AprilSweden  6-3  Finland
21 AprilSweden  6-5  Canada
21 AprilSoviet Union  4-2  Czechoslovakia
21 AprilFinland  7-2  Poland
21 AprilUnited States  7-4  West Germany
22 AprilSoviet Union  4-3  Canada
22 AprilCzechoslovakia  3-3  Sweden
23 AprilFinland  3-3  United States
23 AprilPoland  5-3  West Germany
24 AprilCanada  4-2  Czechoslovakia
24 AprilSoviet Union  3-2  Sweden
25 AprilUnited States  6-1  Poland
25 AprilFinland  3-1  West Germany

Final RoundEdit

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1   Soviet Union 3 3 0 0 11 - 04 6
2   Canada 3 2 0 1 12 - 11 4
3   Czechoslovakia 3 1 0 2 05 - 06 2
4   Sweden 3 0 0 3 05 - 12 0
27 AprilCanada  5-3  Sweden
27 AprilSoviet Union  1-0  Czechoslovakia
29 AprilSoviet Union  5-3  Canada
29 AprilCzechoslovakia  2-1
(2-0, 0-0, 0-1)
  Sweden
Attendance: 13,856
1 MayCanada  4-3  Czechoslovakia
1 MaySoviet Union  5-1  Sweden

Consolation RoundEdit

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
5   Finland 10 5 1 4 35 - 27 11
6   United States 10 4 1 5 37 - 40 9
7   West Germany 10 1 2 7 22 - 41 4
8   Poland 10 1 0 9 12 - 76 2

Poland was relegated to Group B.

26 AprilUnited States  11-2  Poland
26 AprilFinland  3-0  West Germany
28 AprilUnited States  4-3  West Germany
28 AprilFinland  4-0  Poland
30 AprilFinland  6-2  United States
30 AprilWest Germany  2-0  Poland

World Championship Group B (Norway)Edit

Played in Oslo and Lillehammer 30 March to 9 April. The 5 April game between Norway and Austria was officially adjusted to 8-0 for Norway because of Siegfried Haberl's positive drug test.[2] Standard procedure, since 1969, had been for Group B and Group C to exchange two teams, but that stopped this year.

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
9   Norway 7 5 1 1 28 - 16 11
10   Italy 7 5 1 1 37 - 16 11
11   France 7 4 2 1 29 - 18 10
12    Switzerland 7 5 0 2 40 - 21 10
13   East Germany 7 3 0 4 22 - 29 6
14   Austria 7 2 0 5 25 - 32 4
15   Japan 7 2 0 5 20 - 34 4
16   Denmark 7 0 0 7 09 - 44 0

Norway was promoted to Group A and Denmark was relegated to Group C.

30 MarchAustria  3-4  Italy
30 MarchNorway  7-4  Japan
30 MarchFrance  3-5  East Germany
30 MarchSwitzerland   6-3  Denmark
31 MarchNorway  3-1  Italy
31 MarchFrance  8-0  Denmark
1 AprilJapan  0-10   Switzerland
1 AprilEast Germany  4-0  Austria
2 AprilAustria  10-3  Denmark
2 AprilNorway  5-2  East Germany
2 AprilFrance  5-4  Japan
3 AprilSwitzerland   6-7  Italy
4 AprilItaly  3-3  France
4 AprilEast Germany  0-3   Switzerland
4 AprilJapan  2-4  Austria
4 AprilNorway  3-2  Denmark
5 AprilNorway  8-2  Austria
6 AprilItaly  6-0  Japan
6 AprilDenmark  0-9  East Germany
6 AprilSwitzerland   2-5  France
7 AprilDenmark  0-6  Italy
7 AprilNorway  1-1  France
8 AprilJapan  8-1  East Germany
8 AprilAustria  5-7   Switzerland
9 AprilDenmark  1-2  Japan
9 AprilEast Germany  1-10  Italy
9 AprilAustria  3-4  France
9 AprilNorway  1-6   Switzerland

World Championship Group C (Australia)Edit

Played in Sydney 18–27 March.

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
17   Netherlands 7 7 0 0 48 - 15 14
18   Yugoslavia 7 6 0 1 55 - 15 12
19   China 7 4 1 2 31 - 29 9
20   Hungary 7 3 1 3 32 - 30 7
21   Bulgaria 7 3 1 3 35 - 35 7
22   North Korea 7 2 0 5 26 - 40 4
23   South Korea 7 1 1 5 27 - 46 3
24   Australia 7 0 0 7 14 - 58 0

The Netherlands were promoted to Group B, and Australia was relegated to Group D.

18 MarchYugoslavia  8-1  Bulgaria
18 MarchHungary  6-3  North Korea
18 MarchNetherlands  5-2  South Korea
18 MarchAustralia  1-3  China
19 MarchYugoslavia  11-2  South Korea
19 MarchAustralia  2-9  Hungary
20 MarchBulgaria  3-3  China
20 MarchNetherlands  3-1  North Korea
21 MarchChina  5-3  Hungary
21 MarchNetherlands  4-1  Bulgaria
21 MarchNorth Korea  7-4  South Korea
21 MarchAustralia  2-8  Yugoslavia
22 MarchHungary  0-3  Yugoslavia
22 MarchAustralia  2-6  South Korea
23 MarchChina  5-8  Netherlands
23 MarchBulgaria  8-4  North Korea
24 MarchSouth Korea  4-10  China
24 MarchYugoslavia  14-1  North Korea
24 MarchHungary  7-4  Bulgaria
24 MarchAustralia  1-12  Netherlands
26 MarchBulgaria  6-4  South Korea
26 MarchChina  1-8  Yugoslavia
26 MarchNetherlands  8-2  Hungary
26 MarchAustralia  1-8  North Korea
27 MarchNorth Korea  2-4  China
27 MarchSouth Korea  5-5  Hungary
27 MarchYugoslavia  3-8  Netherlands
27 MarchAustralia  5-12  Bulgaria

World Championship Group D (Belgium)Edit

Played in Geel and Heist-op-den-Berg 16–21 March.

Positive drug tests wiped out the results of the first day: both games were officially rendered scoreless, and were counted as losses for all four teams.[2]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
25   Belgium 4 3 0 1 35 - 09 6
26   Romania 4 2 1 1 69 - 07 5
27   Great Britain 4 1 1 2 19 - 16 3
28   Spain 4 1 0 3 29 - 27 2
29   New Zealand 4 0 0 4 03 - 96 0

Both Belgium and Romania were promoted to Group C.

16 MarchNew Zealand  0-26  Great Britain
16 MarchBelgium  3-8  Romania
17 MarchSpain  23-0  New Zealand
17 MarchGreat Britain  6-6  Romania
18 MarchBelgium  8-2  Spain
19 MarchNew Zealand  1-52  Romania
19 MarchGreat Britain  5-6  Belgium
20 MarchSpain  0-11  Romania
21 MarchSpain  4-8  Great Britain
21 MarchBelgium  21-2  New Zealand

Ranking and statisticsEdit

 


 1989 IIHF World Championship Winners 
 
Soviet Union
21st title

Tournament AwardsEdit

Final standingsEdit

The final standings of the tournament according to IIHF:

    Soviet Union
    Canada
    Czechoslovakia
4   Sweden
5   Finland
6   United States
7   West Germany
8   Poland

European championships final standingsEdit

The final standings of the European Championship were determined by the points earned in games played solely between European teams.[4]

    Soviet Union
    Czechoslovakia
    Sweden
4   Finland
5   Poland
6   West Germany

Scoring leadersEdit

List shows the top skaters sorted by points, then goals.

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
  Brian Bellows 10 8 6 14 +12 2 F
  Vladimír Růžička 10 7 7 14 +11 2 F
  Kari Jalonen 10 5 9 14 +14 0 F
  Kent Nilsson 10 3 11 14 +7 0 F
  Vyacheslav Bykov 10 6 6 12 +9 2 F
  Steve Yzerman 8 5 7 12 +5 2 F
  Dale Hawerchuk 10 4 8 12 +10 6 F
  Kirk Muller 9 6 4 10 +12 6 F
  Jukka Vilander 10 6 4 10 0 0 F
  Vladimír Svitek 10 4 6 10 +10 0 F

Source: [1]

Leading goaltendersEdit

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played 50% of their team's minutes are included in this list.

Player MIP GA GAA SVS% SO
  Sergei Mylnikov 420 11 1.57 .922 1
  Sean Burke 275 10 2.18 .918 1
  Jukka Tammi 520 23 2.65 .916 2
  Dominik Hašek 600 21 2.10 .915 2
  Peter Lindmark 299 15 3.01 .900 0

Source: [2]

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ Duplacey page 508
  2. ^ a b c 1989 Summary at Passionhockey.com
  3. ^ Greenberg, Alan (22 October 1989). "Mogilny Makes Way into NHL at Tender Age of 20". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  4. ^ Malolepszy, Tomasz (2013). European Ice Hockey Championship Results Since 1910. Scarecrow Press. p. 1. Retrieved 21 April 2020.

ReferencesEdit