1976 in video games

1976 had new titles such as Road Race, Night Driver, Heavyweight Champ, Sea Wolf and Breakout. The year's highest-grossing arcade games were Namco's F-1 in Japan and Midway's Sea Wolf in the United States.

List of years in video games

Highest-grossing arcade gamesEdit

JapanEdit

In Japan, Game Machine magazine published the first annual arcade game earnings chart for 1976 in their February 1977 issue, listing both arcade video games and electro-mechanical games (EM games) on the same arcade chart. Namco's EM racing game F-1 was the highest-grossing overall arcade game of the year, followed by Taito's video game Ball Park (originally released as Tornado Baseball by Midway Manufacturing in North America). The following titles were the highest-grossing arcade games of 1976, according to the first annual Game Machine chart.[1][2]

Arcade electro-mechanical games (EM games) Arcade video games
Rank Title Points Rank Title Points Genre
1 F-1 64 1 Ball Park (Tornado Baseball) 34 Sports
2 Mogura Taiji (Whac-A-Mole) 18 2 Speed Race DX 26 Racing
3 Group Skill Diga 12 3 Heavyweight Champ 20 Boxing
4 Sky Hawk 11 4 Breakout 14 Block kuzushi
5 Mini Laser Clay 6 5 Sea Wolf 10 Shooter
Wild Gunman 6 6 LeMans 5 Racing
7 400 Miles 4 7 Kamikaze (Zero Fighter Kamikaze) 4 Shooter
Flipper (Pinball)[a] 4 8 Sparkling Corner 3 Racing
9 Un­known 1 Speed Race Twin 3
Un­known 1 10 Indy 800 2 Racing
Un­known 1 Night Driver 2
Rock n' Bark 2 Shooter
Western Gun (Gun Fight) 2

Note: Medal games are listed on a separate chart, with Nintendo's EVR Race being the highest-grossing medal game of the year.[1][2]

United StatesEdit

In the United States, RePlay magazine began publishing annual lists of top-grossing arcade games in 1976, covering both arcade video games and pinball machines. The following titles were the top ten arcade video games of the year, in terms of coin drop earnings.[3] Lifetime arcade cabinet sales are also given in a separate column.

Rank[3] Title Developer Manufacturer Genre Lifetime cabinet sales
1 Sea Wolf Dave Nutting Associates Midway Manufacturing Shooter 10,000[4]
2 Gun Fight (Western Gun) Taito Midway Manufacturing Shooter 8,600[5]
3 Wheels (Speed Race) Taito Midway Manufacturing Racing 7,000[6]
4 Indy 800 Atari, Inc. Atari, Inc. Racing 6,495[7]
5 Breakout Atari, Inc. Atari, Inc. Block breaker 11,000[7]
6 Indy 4 Atari, Inc. Atari, Inc. Racing Un­known
7 Bi-Plane Fun Games Fun Games Shooter
8 Death Race Exidy Exidy Racing
Demolition Derby Exidy Chicago Coin
Trivia Ramtek Quiz

EventsEdit

BusinessEdit

Notable releasesEdit

GamesEdit

HardwareEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ フリッパー, Furippā

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "本紙アンケー 〜 ト調査の結果" [Paper Questionnaire: Results of the Survey] (PDF). Game Machine (in Japanese). No. 65. Amusement Press, Inc. February 1, 1977. pp. 2–3.
  2. ^ a b "調査対象5年間のベスト1" [Best 1 of the 5 Years Surveyed] (PDF). Game Machine (in Japanese). No. 159. Amusement Press, Inc. February 15, 1981. p. 1.
  3. ^ a b "Profit Chart". RePlay. October 1976.
  4. ^ Steven L. Kent (2000), The first quarter: a 25-year history of video games, BWD Press, p. 83, ISBN 0-9704755-0-0, retrieved April 9, 2011, Sea Wolf, which was another creation of Dave Nutting, did solid business, selling more than 10,000 machines. (A later color version sold an additional 4000 units.)
  5. ^ Smith, Alexander (November 19, 2019). They Create Worlds: The Story of the People and Companies That Shaped the Video Game Industry, Vol. I: 1971-1982. CRC Press. p. 262. ISBN 978-0-429-75261-2.
  6. ^ Baer, Ralph H. (2005). Videogames: In the Beginning. Rolenta Press. pp. 10–3. ISBN 978-0-9643848-1-1.
  7. ^ a b Product: Total Build (PDF). Atari Games. 1999. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 10, 2013. Retrieved March 4, 2021.
  8. ^ a b Thomas, Donald A. Jr (2005). "–1976–". ICWhen.com. Archived from the original (shtml) on March 17, 2006. Retrieved February 18, 2006.
  9. ^ TV Games Probed, Reading Eagle (December 21, 1976)
  10. ^ "The Replay Years: Enter 1976". RePlay. Vol. 11, no. 2. November 1985. p. 150.
  11. ^ "Heavyweight Champ (1976) Release Information for Arcade Games - GameFAQs".
  12. ^ a b Spencer, Spanner, The Tao of Beat-'em-ups, EuroGamer, February 6, 2008, Accessed February 23, 2009
  13. ^ Ashcraft, Brian, (2008) Arcade Mania! The Turbo-Charged World of Japan's Game Centers, (Kodansha International), p. 94
  14. ^ Nadia Oxford, 20 Years of Street Fighter, 1UP.com, November 12, 2007
  15. ^ "Road Race, Arcade Video game by SEGA Enterprises (1976)".
  16. ^ AP (July 2, 1976). "It Offers That Run-Down Feeling". The Minneapolis Star. p. 3A. Retrieved August 30, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ Gonzalez, Lauren. "When Two Tribes Go to War: A History of Video Game Controversy / The Major Offenders". GameSpot. Archived from the original on July 18, 2007. Retrieved February 18, 2006.
  18. ^ "Speed Race Twin, Arcade Video game by Taito (1976)".
  19. ^ Speed Race Twin at the Killer List of Videogames
  20. ^ "Atari - 1972 - 1984". www.atari.com. Archived from the original on June 11, 2016. Retrieved August 30, 2017.
  21. ^ "Ryu ga Gotoku Zero: Chikai no Basho , Sony PlayStation 3 disc by SEGA Holdings(2016)".
  22. ^ Moto-Cross at the Killer List of Videogames
  23. ^ Road Race at the Killer List of Videogames
  24. ^ Mark J. P. Wolf (2008), The video game explosion: a history from PONG to PlayStation and beyond, p. 39, ABC-CLIO, ISBN 0-313-33868-X
  25. ^ Fonz at the Killer List of Videogames
  26. ^ "Night Driver , Arcade Video game by Atari, Inc. (1976)".
  27. ^ Adams, Rick. "A history of 'Adventure'". The Colossal Cave Adventure page. Retrieved February 17, 2006.
  28. ^ "Fairchild Video Entertainment System/Channel F". ClassicGaming.com. Archived from the original on June 10, 2007. Retrieved February 18, 2006.
  29. ^ Winter, David (2006). "Coleco Telstar". PONG-Story. Archived from the original on March 2, 2006. Retrieved February 18, 2006.