1931 in the United Kingdom

Events from the year 1931 in the United Kingdom.

1931 in the United Kingdom
Other years
1929 | 1930 | 1931 (1931) | 1932 | 1933
Constituent countries of the United Kingdom
England | Northern Ireland | Scotland | Wales
Popular culture

IncumbentsEdit

EventsEdit

PublicationsEdit

BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN 0-14-102715-0.
  2. ^ Delany, Ruth (1986). A celebration of 250 years of Ireland's Inland Waterways. Belfast: Appletree Press. ISBN 0-86281-200-3.
  3. ^ "Abandonment of Ulster Canal". Northern Whig. Belfast. 14 January 1931. p. 1.
  4. ^ "1931, 29th January, Haig Pit, Whitehaven, Cumberland No.4". HealeyHero. Retrieved 18 October 2010.
  5. ^ "Crash of a Blackburn Iris III off RAF Mount Batten". Bureau of Aircraft Accidents Archives. Retrieved 5 February 2021.
  6. ^ The Journal of the T. E. Lawrence Society. The Society. 2000. p. 69.
  7. ^ Returns for England and Wales are destroyed by fire in 1942.
  8. ^ The Hutchinson Factfinder. Helicon. 1999. ISBN 1-85986-000-1.
  9. ^ Moggridge, D. E. (1992). Maynard Keynes: an Economist's Biography. London: Routledge. p. 510. ISBN 0-415-05141-X.
  10. ^ Mowat, Charles Loch (1955). Britain Between the Wars: 1918–1940. London: Methuen. pp. 260–261.
  11. ^ Hayek, F. A. (1944). The Road to Serfdom. London: Routledge. pp. 66–67.
  12. ^ "Earth Science resources – earthquake records". Archived from the original on 24 February 2008. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  13. ^ "Joseph Emberton, Architect". 2004. Retrieved 4 April 2015.
  14. ^ "George V (1865–1936)". History. BBC. Retrieved 30 November 2011.
  15. ^ Divers, Paul. "John Thompson (1909–1931) – The Prince of Goalkeepers". Irish Light and Colour. Archived from the original on 31 March 2012. Retrieved 30 November 2011.
  16. ^ a b Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 373–374. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2.
  17. ^ Price, Alfred (1977). Spitfire: a Documentary History. London: Macdonald and Jane’s. p. 12. ISBN 0-354-01077-8.
  18. ^ The History Today Companion to British History. London: Collins & Brown. 1995. p. 509. ISBN 1-85585-178-4.
  19. ^ Slee, Christopher (1994). The Guinness Book of Lasts. Enfield: Guinness Publishing. ISBN 0-85112-783-5.
  20. ^ "Bentley Colliery. 1931. 45 Killed". Pitwork. Durham Mining Museum. Retrieved 22 May 2021.
  21. ^ "The Red and White Party". Cocktails With Elvira. 26 October 2011. Retrieved 30 January 2014.
  22. ^ Hobhouse, Hermione (1975). A History of Regent Street. Macdonald and Jane's. p. 142. ISBN 0362-00234-7.
  23. ^ Marshall, Prince (1972). Wheels of London. The Sunday Times Magazine. ISBN 0-7230-0068-9.
  24. ^ Keating, H. R. F. (1982). Whodunit? – a guide to crime, suspense and spy fiction. London: Windward. ISBN 0-7112-0249-4.
  25. ^ Strachan, Alan (5 July 2004). "Peter Barnes: Surprising and adventurous dramatist". The Independent. Retrieved 5 September 2014.
  26. ^ "Stuttaford, Dr (Irving) Thomas, (4 May 1931 – 8 June 2018), medical correspondent, the Oldie, since 1992 | Who's WHO & WHO WAS WHO".
  27. ^ "OBITUARIES Geoffrey Dickens". The Independent. 18 May 1995.

Further readingEdit

  • Bogdanor, Vernon. "1931 Revisited: The Constitutional Aspects," Twentieth Century British History 1991 2(1): 1-25, argues that George V played a crucial role in the political crisis of August-October 1931.
  • Somervell, D.C. The Reign of King George V, (1936) 550pp;political, social and economic coverage, online free
  • Williamson, Philip. "1931 Revisited: the Political Realities." Twentieth Century British History 1991 2(3): 328–338. Disputes Bogdanor, saying the idea of a national government had been in the minds of party leaders for some time and it was they, not the king, who determined when the time had come to establish one.

External linksEdit