The 190s decade ran from January 1, 190, to December 31, 199.

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

Events

190

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
ChinaEdit
ParthiaEdit

By topicEdit

Art and ScienceEdit
  • Cleomedes teaches that the moon does not glow on its own, but rather reflects sunlight.
EconomicEdit
  • Egypt (under Roman rule) is impoverished due to an inflation rate of 100% during the previous decade.
  • The percentage of silver in the Egyptian denarius is lowered from 90% to 70%.

191

By placeEdit

ParthiaEdit
ChinaEdit
  • A coalition of Chinese warlords from the east of Hangu Pass launches a punitive campaign against the warlord Dong Zhuo, who seized control of the central government in 189, and held the figurehead Emperor Xian hostage. After suffering some defeats against the coalition forces, Dong Zhuo forcefully relocates the imperial capital from Luoyang to Chang'an. Before leaving, Dong Zhuo orders his troops to loot the tombs of the Han emperors, and then destroy Luoyang by fire, to leave behind nothing for the coalition.
  • Battle of Jieqiao: Yuan Shao narrowly defeats Gongsun Zan, in northern China.

By topicEdit

ArtEdit
ReligionEdit

192

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
ChinaEdit
VietnamEdit
  • The kingdom of Champa begins to control south and central Vietnam (approximate date).

By topicEdit

Arts and ScienceEdit
ReligionEdit

193

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
ChinaEdit

By topicEdit

CommerceEdit

194

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
ChinaEdit

By topicEdit

Art and ScienceEdit
  • Galen writes his manual on pathology, The Art of Curing.
ReligionEdit

195

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
  • Emperor Septimius Severus has the Roman Senate deify the previous emperor Commodus, in an attempt to gain favor with the family of Marcus Aurelius.
  • King Vologases V and other eastern princes support the claims of Pescennius Niger. The Roman province of Mesopotamia rises in revolt with Parthian support. Severus marches to Mesopotamia to battle the Parthians.
  • The Roman province of Syria is divided and the role of Antioch is diminished. The Romans annexed the Syrian cities of Edessa and Nisibis. Severus re-establish his headquarters and the colonies there.
  • Lucius Septimius Bassianus (or Caracalla), age 7, changes his name to Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, to solidify connections with the family of Marcus Aurelius, and is given the title Caesar.
  • Clodius Albinus, who had been proclaimed emperor in Britain, crosses into Gaul with his legions, while at the same time recruiting new soldiers. He is soon the head of an army of 150,000 men, according to Cassius Dio. Severus, still in Mesopotamia, hastily returns to Rome.
  • The denarius is devalued by Severus. The coin now contains only 50% precious metal.
ChinaEdit

196

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
ChinaEdit
KoreaEdit

197

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

Art and ScienceEdit
  • Galen's major work on medicines, Pharmacologia, is published.
ReligionEdit

198

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
ChinaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

199

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
ChinaEdit
KoreaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

190

191

192

193

194

195

196

197

198

  • Lu Kai (or Jingfeng), Chinese official and general (d. 269)
  • Quan Cong, Chinese general and advisor (d. 249)


DeathsEdit

190

191

192

193

194

195

196

197

198

199


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Jacobs, David (2015). Istanbul: A History. New Word City. p. 24. ISBN 9781612309262.
  2. ^ "Istanbul | History, Points of Interest, & Map". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 29 March 2019.
  3. ^ a b "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  4. ^ "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  5. ^ Boatwright, Mary Taliaferro; Gargola, Daniel J.; Talbert, Richard J. A. (2004). The Romans: from village to empire. Oxford University Press. p. 410. ISBN 978-0-19-511875-9.
  6. ^ Kohn, George C. (2007). Dictionary of wars (3rd ed.). Infobase Publishing. p. 451. ISBN 978-0-8160-6577-6.
  7. ^ Bunson, Matthew (2002). Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire (2nd ed.). Infobase Publishing. p. 252. ISBN 978-0-8160-4562-4.
  8. ^ Erdkamp, Paul (2010). A Companion to the Roman Army. John Wiley and Sons. p. 272. ISBN 978-1-4443-3921-5.
  9. ^ Bunson, Matthew (2004). OSV's encyclopedia of Catholic history. Our Sunday Visitor Publishing. pp. 986–987. ISBN 978-1-59276-026-8.
  10. ^ Goodman, Howard L. (2010). Xun Xu and the Politics of Precision in Third-Century Ad China. BRILL. p. 39. ISBN 978-9004183377.
  11. ^ Meijer, Fik (2004). Emperors Don't Die in Bed. Routledge. p. 66. ISBN 978-1-134-38405-1.
  12. ^ Huang, Hongquan (1988). Anthology of Song Dynasty Ci-poetry. People's Liberation Army Pub. House. p. 542.
  13. ^ Léon, Wieger (1928). Werner, Edward Theodore Chalmers (ed.). China throughout the ages. Hsien Press. p. 449.