143 (number)

143 (one hundred [and] forty-three) is the natural number following 142 and preceding 144.

← 142 143 144 →
Cardinalone hundred forty-three
Ordinal143rd
(one hundred forty-third)
Factorization11 × 13
Divisors1, 11, 13, 143
Greek numeralΡΜΓ´
Roman numeralCXLIII
Binary100011112
Ternary120223
Octal2178
DuodecimalBB12
Hexadecimal8F16

In mathematicsEdit

143 is the sum of seven consecutive primes (11 + 13 + 17 + 19 + 23 + 29 + 31). But this number is never the sum of an integer and its base 10 digits, making it a self number.

Every positive integer is the sum of at most 143 seventh powers (see Waring's problem).

143 is the difference in the first exception to the pattern shown below:

 
 
 .

In the militaryEdit

In transportationEdit

In mediaEdit

  • 143 (film), a 2004 Indian film
  • Musicians Ray J and Bobby Brackins wrote the song "143"
  • On Mister Rogers' Neighborhood: "Transformations", 143 is used to mean "I love you". 1 meaning I for 1 letter, 4 meaning Love for the 4 letters, and 3 meaning You for the 3 letters. Reportedly, Fred Rogers maintained his weight at exactly 143 pounds for the last thirty years of his life, and associated the number with the phrase "I love you"[1]
  • Jake Shimabukuro released the song "143" based on his experience in high school when 143 was sent on a pager to indicate "I Love You" [2]
  • Sal Governale of The Howard Stern Show had a long running saga on the show about his wife who had an emotional friend. He discovered the severity of their relationship when he read their text messages and emails which included "143", shorthand for "I love you".[3]

In popular cultureEdit

  • A popular pager number to communicate "I love you" (based on the number of letters in each of the three words)[4]

In other fieldsEdit

143 is also:

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hattikutur, Mangkesh. "15 reasons Mr. Rogers was best neighbor ever." http://www.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/wayoflife/07/28/mf.mrrogers.neighbor/ Mental Floss/CNN. 28 Jul 2008.
  2. ^ "Peace Love Ukelele". jakeshimabukuro.com. 19 May 2015. Archived from the original on 2018-03-01. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  3. ^ "MarksFriggin.com - Stern Show News - Archive". www.marksfriggin.com. Retrieved 2020-07-31.
  4. ^ https://www.dictionary.com/e/slang/143
  5. ^ Nan Cross: Supported men resisting apartheid conscription Sunday Times (South Africa), 2007-07-22, accessed 2009-01-05[permanent dead link].

External linksEdit