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300 (three hundred) is the natural number following 299 and preceding 301.

← 299 300 301 →
Cardinalthree hundred
Ordinal300th
(three hundredth)
Factorization22× 3 × 52
Greek numeralΤ´
Roman numeralCCC
Binary1001011002
Ternary1020103
Quaternary102304
Quinary22005
Senary12206
Octal4548
Duodecimal21012
Hexadecimal12C16
VigesimalF020
Base 368C36
Hebrewש (Shin)

Contents

Mathematical propertiesEdit

The number 300 is a triangular number and the sum of a pair of twin primes (149 + 151), as well as the sum of ten consecutive primes (13 + 17 + 19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47). It is palindromic in 3 consecutive bases: 30010 = 6067 = 4548 = 3639, and also in base 13. Factorization is 22 × 3 × 52.

Other fieldsEdit

Three hundred is:

Integers from 301 to 399Edit

300sEdit

301Edit

301 = 7 × 43. 301 is the sum of three consecutive primes (97 + 101 + 103), happy number in base 10[1]

An HTTP status code, indicating the content has been moved and the change is permanent (permanent redirect). It is also the number of a debated Turkish penal code.

302Edit

302 = 2 × 151. 302 is a nontotient[2] and a happy number[1]

302 is the HTTP status code indicating the content has been moved (temporary redirect). It is also the displacement in cubic inches of Ford's "5.0" V8 and the area code for the state of Delaware.

303Edit

303 = 3 × 101

303 is the "See other" HTTP status code, indicating content can be found elsewhere. Model number of the Roland TB-303 synthesizer which is accredited as having been used to create the first acid house music tracks, in the late 1980s.

304Edit

304 = 24 × 19. 304 is the sum of six consecutive primes (41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61), sum of eight consecutive primes (23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53), primitive semiperfect number,[3] untouchable number,[4] nontotient[2]

304 is the HTTP code indicating the content has not been modified, and the record number of wickets taken in English cricket season by Tich Freeman in 1928. 304 is also the name of a card game popular in Sri Lanka and southern India.

It is also one of the telephone area codes for West Virginia.

305Edit

305 = 5 × 61.

305 is the HTTP status code indicating a proxy must be used.

306Edit

306 = 2 × 32 × 17. 306 is the sum of four consecutive primes (71 + 73 + 79 + 83), pronic number,[5] Harshad number, and an untouchable number.[4]

It is also a telephone area code for the province of Saskatchewan, Canada.

307Edit

307 is a prime number, Chen prime,[6] and the HTTP status code for "temporary redirect"

308Edit

308 = 22 × 7 × 11. 308 is a nontotient,[2] totient sum of the first 31 integers, Harshad number, heptagonal pyramidal number,[7] and the sum of two consecutive primes (151 + 157).

309Edit

309 = 3 × 103

310sEdit

310Edit

310 = 2 × 5 × 31. 310 is a sphenic number,[8] noncototient,[9] and self number.[10]

311Edit

311 is a prime number.

312Edit

312 = 23 × 3 × 13. 312 is Harshad number and self number[10]

313Edit

313 is a prime number.

314Edit

314 = 2 × 157. 314 is a nontotient.[2]

315Edit

315 = 32 × 5 × 7. 315 is a Harshad number

316Edit

316 = 22 × 79. 316 is a centered triangular number[11] and a centered heptagonal number[12]

317Edit

317 is a prime number, Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, Chen prime,[6] and a strictly non-palindromic number.

317 is the exponent (and number of ones) in the fourth base-10 repunit prime.[13]

317 is also shorthand for the LM317 adjustable regulator chip. It is also the area code for the Indianapolis region.

318Edit

318 = 2 × 3 × 53. It is a sphenic number,[8] nontotient,[2] and the sum of twelve consecutive primes (7 + 11 + 13 + 17 + 19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47)

319Edit

319 = 11 × 29. 319 is the sum of three consecutive primes (103 + 107 + 109), Smith number,[14] cannot be represented as the sum of fewer than 19 fourth powers, happy number in base 10[1]

"319" is a song by Prince.

British Rail Class 319s are dual-voltage electric multiple unit trains

320sEdit

320Edit

320 = 26 × 5 = (25) × (2 × 5). 320 is a Leyland number,[15] maximum determinant of a 10 by 10 matrix of zeros and ones, and a Harshad number. A popular bitrate.

321Edit

321 = 3 × 107, a Delannoy number[16]

An area code in central Florida.

322Edit

322 = 2 × 7 × 23. 322 is a sphenic,[8] nontotient, untouchable,[4] Lucas number,[17] and a Harshad number.

It is also seen as a Skull and Bones reference of power

323Edit

323 = 17 × 19. 323 is the sum of nine consecutive primes (19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53), the sum of the 13 consecutive primes (5 + 7 + 11 + 13 + 17 + 19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47), Motzkin number,[18] self number.[10] A Lucas and Fibonacci pseudoprime. See 323 (disambiguation)

324Edit

324 = 22 × 34 = 182. 324 is the sum of four consecutive primes (73 + 79 + 83 + 89), totient sum of the first 32 integers, untouchable number,[4] and a Harshad number.

325Edit

325 = 52 × 13. 325 is a triangular number, hexagonal number,[19] nonagonal number,[20] centered nonagonal number.[21] 325 is the smallest number to be the sum of two squares in 3 different ways: 12 + 182, 62 + 172 and 102 + 152. 325 is also the smallest (and only known) 3-hyperperfect number.

326Edit

326 = 2 × 163. 326 is a nontotient, noncototient,[9] and an untouchable number.[4] 326 is the sum of the 14 consecutive primes (3 + 5 + 7 + 11 + 13 + 17 + 19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47).

327Edit

327 = 3 × 109. 327 is a perfect totient number.[22]

328Edit

328 = 23 × 41. 328 is a refactorable number,[23] and it is the sum of the first fifteen primes (2 + 3 + 5 + 7 + 11 + 13 + 17 + 19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47).

329Edit

329 = 7 × 47. 329 is the sum of three consecutive primes (107 + 109 + 113), and a highly cototient number.[24]

330sEdit

330Edit

330 = 2 × 3 × 5 × 11. 330 is sum of six consecutive primes (43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61 + 67), pentatope number (and hence a binomial coefficient  ), a pentagonal number,[25] divisible by the number of primes below it, sparsely totient number,[26] and a Harshad number.

331Edit

331 is a prime number, cuban prime,[27] sum of five consecutive primes (59 + 61 + 67 + 71 + 73), centered pentagonal number,[28] centered hexagonal number,[29] and Mertens function returns 0.[30]

332Edit

332 = 22 × 83, Mertens function returns 0.[30]

333Edit

333 = 32 × 37, Mertens function returns 0,[30] Harshad number.

Symbolically, 333 is used to represent Choronzon, a demon used in the philosophy of Thelema.

334Edit

334 = 2 × 167, nontotient, self number,[10]

334 was the long-time highest score for Australia in Test cricket (held by Sir Donald Bradman and Mark Taylor). 334 is also the name of a science fiction novel by Thomas M. Disch.

335Edit

335 = 5 × 67, divisible by the number of primes below it.

336Edit

336 = 24 × 3 × 7, Harshad number, untouchable number,[4] also the number of dimples on an American golf ball.

337Edit

337, prime number, permutable prime with 373 and 733, Chen prime,[6] star number

338Edit

338 = 2 × 132, nontotient.

339Edit

339 = 3 × 113

340sEdit

340Edit

340 = 22 × 5 × 17, sum of eight consecutive primes (29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59), sum of ten consecutive primes (17 + 19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53), sum of the first four powers of 4 (41 + 42 + 43 + 44), divisible by the number of primes below it, nontotient, noncototient.[9]

341Edit

341 = 11 × 31, sum of seven consecutive primes (37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61), octagonal number,[31] centered cube number,[32] super-Poulet number. 341 is the smallest Fermat pseudoprime; it is the least composite odd modulus m greater than the base b, that satisfies the Fermat property "bm−1 − 1 is divisible by m", for bases up to 128 of b = 2, 15, 60, 63, 78, and 108.

342Edit

342 = 2 × 32 × 19, pronic number,[5] Harshad number, untouchable number.[4]

343Edit

343 = 73, nice Friedman number since 343 = (3 + 4)3. It's the only known example of x2+x+1 = y3, in this case, x=18, y=7. It is z3 in a triplet (x,y,z) such that x5 + y2 = z3.

The speed of sound in dry air at 20 °C (68 °F) is 343 m/s.

344Edit

344 = 23 × 43, octahedral number,[33] noncototient,[9] totient sum of the first 33 integers, refactorable number.[23]

345Edit

345 = 3 × 5 × 23, sphenic number,[8] self number.[10]

346Edit

346 = 2 × 173, Smith number,[14] noncototient.[9]

347Edit

347 is a prime number, safe prime,[34] Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, Chen prime,[6] Friedman number since 347 = 73 + 4, and a strictly non-palindromic number.

It is the number of an area code in New York.

348Edit

348 = 22 × 3 × 29, sum of four consecutive primes (79 + 83 + 89 + 97), refactorable number.[23]

349Edit

349, prime number, sum of three consecutive primes (109 + 113 + 127), since 1976 the number of seats in the Swedish parliament.[35]

350sEdit

350Edit

350 = 2 × 52 × 7, primitive semiperfect number,[3] divisible by the number of primes below it, nontotient, a truncated icosahedron of frequency 6 has 350 hexagonal faces and 12 pentagonal faces.

350.org is an international environmental organization. 350 is the number of cubic inches displaced in the most common form of the Small Block Chevrolet V8. The number of seats in the Congress of Deputies (Spain) is 350.

351Edit

351 = 33 × 13, triangular number, sum of five consecutive primes (61 + 67 + 71 + 73 + 79), member of Padovan sequence,[36] Harshad number.

It is also the 351 Windsor engine from Ford Motor Company as well as the 351 (building) in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador.

352Edit

352 = 25 × 11, the number of n-Queens Problem solutions for n = 9. It is the sum of two consecutive primes (173 + 179).

The number of international appearances by Kristine Lilly for the USA women's national football (soccer) team, an all-time record for the sport.

The country calling code for Luxembourg

353Edit

353 is a prime number, Chen prime,[6] Proth prime,[37] Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, palindromic prime, and Mertens function returns 0.[30] 353 is the base of the smallest 4th power that is the sum of 4 other 4th powers, discovered by Norrie in 1911: 3534 = 304 + 1204 + 2724 + 3154.

354Edit

354 = 2 × 3 × 59, sphenic number,[8] nontotient, also SMTP code meaning start of mail input. It is also sum of absolute value of the coefficients of Conway's polynomial.

355Edit

355 = 5 × 71, Smith number,[14] Mertens function returns 0,[30] divisible by the number of primes below it. the numerator of the best simplified rational approximation of pi having a denominator of four digits or fewer. This fraction (355/113) is known as Milü.

356Edit

356 = 22 × 89, Mertens function returns 0,[30] self number.[10]

357Edit

357 = 3 × 7 × 17, sphenic number.[8]

357 also refers to firearms or ammunition of .357 caliber, with the best-known cartridge of that size being the .357 Magnum. The .357 SIG, whose name was inspired by the performance of the .357 Magnum, is actually a 9 mm or .355 caliber.

358Edit

358 = 2 × 179, sum of six consecutive primes (47 + 53 + 59 + 61 + 67 + 71), Mertens function returns 0.[30] It is the country calling code for Finland.

359Edit

359 is a prime number, safe prime,[34] Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, Chen prime,[6] and strictly non-palindromic number.

360sEdit

360Edit

361Edit

361 = 192, centered triangular number,[11] centered octagonal number, centered decagonal number,[38] member of the Mian–Chowla sequence;[39] also the number of positions on a standard 19 x 19 Go board. The Bahá'í calendar is based on 19 months of 19 days each.

362Edit

362 = 2 × 181, Mertens function returns 0,[30] nontotient, noncototient.[9]

363Edit

363 = 3 × 112, sum of nine consecutive primes (23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59), Mertens function returns 0,[30] perfect totient number.[22]

364Edit

364 = 22 × 7 × 13, tetrahedral number,[40] sum of twelve consecutive primes (11 + 13 + 17 + 19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53), Mertens function returns 0,[30] nontotient, Harshad number. It is a repdigit in base 3 (111111), base 9 (444), base 25 (EE), base 27 (DD), base 51 (77) and base 90 (44).

The total number of gifts received in the song "The Twelve Days of Christmas".

365Edit

365 = 5 × 73

366Edit

366 = 2 × 3 × 61, sphenic number,[8] Mertens function returns 0,[30] noncototient.[9] Also, the number of days in a leap year; it is 26-gonal and 123-gonal.

367Edit

367 is a prime number, Perrin number,[41] self number,[10] happy number, and a strictly non-palindromic number.

368Edit

368 = 24 × 23 It is also a Leyland number.[15]

369Edit

369 = 32 × 41, it is the magic constant of the 9 × 9 normal magic square and n-queens problem for n = 9; there are 369 free polyominoes of order 8. With 370, a Ruth–Aaron pair with only distinct prime factors counted.

370sEdit

370Edit

370 = 2 × 5 × 37, sphenic number,[8] sum of four consecutive primes (83 + 89 + 97 + 101), Nontotient, with 369 part of a Ruth–Aaron pair with only distinct prime factors counted, Harshad number, Base 10 Armstrong number since 33 + 73 + 03 = 370.

System/370 is a computing architecture from IBM.

371Edit

371 = 7 × 53, sum of three consecutive primes (113 + 127 + 131), sum of seven consecutive primes (41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61 + 67), sum of the primes from its least to its greatest prime factor (sequence A055233 in the OEIS), the next such composite number is 2935561623745, Armstrong number since 33 + 73 + 13 = 371.

372Edit

372 = 22 × 3 × 31, sum of eight consecutive primes (31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61), Harshad number, noncototient,[9] untouchable number,[4] refactorable number.[23]

373Edit

373, prime number, balanced prime,[42] sum of five consecutive primes (67 + 71 + 73 + 79 + 83), permutable prime with 337 and 733, palindromic prime in 3 consecutive bases: 5658 = 4549 = 37310 and also in base 4: 113114, two-sided primes.

374Edit

374 = 2 × 11 × 17, sphenic number,[8] nontotient.

375Edit

375 = 3 × 53, Harshad number

376Edit

376 = 23 × 47, pentagonal number,[25] 1-automorphic number,[43] nontotient, refactorable number.[23]

377Edit

377 = 13 × 29, Fibonacci number, a Lucas and Fibonacci pseudoprime, the sum of the squares of the first six primes, a common approximation for the impedance of free space in ohms.

377 is an approximation of 2π60, which crops up frequently in calculations involving 60 Hz AC power.

378Edit

378 = 2 × 33 × 7, triangular number, hexagonal number,[19] Smith number,[14] Harshad number, self number.[10]

379Edit

379 is a prime number, Chen prime,[6] and a happy number in base 10. It is the sum of the 15 consecutive primes (3 + 5 + 7 + 11 + 13 + 17 + 19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53).

380sEdit

380Edit

380 = 22 × 5 × 19, pronic number.[5]

381Edit

381 = 3 × 127, sum of the first sixteen primes. Palindrome in base 2 and base 8.

It is the sum of the 16 consecutive primes (2 + 3 + 5 + 7 + 11 + 13 + 17 + 19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53).

382Edit

382 = 2 × 191, sum of ten consecutive primes (19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59), Smith number.[14]

383Edit

383, prime number, safe prime,[34] Woodall prime,[44] Thabit number, Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, palindromic prime.

384Edit

385Edit

385 = 5 × 7 × 11, sphenic number,[8] square pyramidal number,[45] the number of integer partitions of 18.

386Edit

386 = 2 × 193, Nontotient, noncototient,[9] centered heptagonal number,[12]

386 is also shorthand for the Intel 80386 microprocessor chip. 386 generation refers to South Koreans, especially politicians, born in the '60s (386 세대 [ko]).

387Edit

387 = 32 × 43, also shorthand for the Intel 80387, math coprocessor chip to the 386.

388Edit

388 = 22 × 97

389Edit

389, prime number, Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, Chen prime,[6] highly cototient number,[24] self number,[10] strictly non-palindromic number. Smallest conductor of a rank 2 Elliptic curve.

Also, 389 equals the displacement in cubic inches of the famous Pontiac GTO V-8 engine of 1964–66. The port number for LDAP, and the name for the Fedora Directory Server project.

390sEdit

390Edit

390 = 2 × 3 × 5 × 13, sum of four consecutive primes (89 + 97 + 101 + 103), nontotient,

System/390 is a computing architecture from IBM.

391Edit

391 = 17 × 23, Smith number,[14] centered pentagonal number.[28]

392Edit

392 = 23 × 72, Harshad number.

393Edit

393 = 3 × 131, Mertens function returns 0.[30]

393 is the number of county equivalents in Canada

394Edit

394 = 2 × 197, a Schroder number,[46] nontotient, noncototient.[9]

395Edit

395 = 5 × 79, sum of three consecutive primes (127 + 131 + 137), sum of five consecutive primes (71 + 73 + 79 + 83 + 89).

396Edit

396 = 22 × 32 × 11, sum of twin primes (197 + 199), totient sum of the first 36 integers, refactorable number,[23] Harshad number, digit-reassembly number.

396 also refers to the displacement in cubic inches of early Chevrolet Big-Block engines.

397Edit

397, prime number, cuban prime,[27] centered hexagonal number.[29]

398Edit

398 = 2 × 199, nontotient.

399Edit

399 = 3 × 7 × 19, sphenic number,[8] smallest Lucas–Carmichael number, Harshad number.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A007770 (Happy numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  2. ^ a b c d e Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005277 (Nontotients)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  3. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A006036 (Primitive pseudoperfect numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005114 (Untouchable numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  5. ^ a b c Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002378 (Oblong numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A109611 (Chen primes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  7. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002413 (Heptagonal pyramidal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A007304 (Sphenic numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005278 (Noncototients)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A003052 (Self numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  11. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005448 (Centered triangular numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  12. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A069099 (Centered heptagonal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  13. ^ Guy, Richard; Unsolved Problems in Number Theory, p. 7 ISBN 1475717385
  14. ^ a b c d e f Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A006753 (Smith numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  15. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A076980 (Leyland numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  16. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001850 (Central Delannoy numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  17. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000032 (Lucas numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  18. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001006 (Motzkin numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  19. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000384 (Hexagonal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  20. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001106 (9-gonal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  21. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A060544 (Centered 9-gonal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  22. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A082897 (Perfect totient numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  23. ^ a b c d e f Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A033950 (Refactorable numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  24. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A100827 (Highly cototient numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  25. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000326 (Pentagonal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  26. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A036913 (Sparsely totient numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  27. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002407 (Cuban primes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  28. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005891 (Centered pentagonal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  29. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A003215 (Hex numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A028442 (Numbers n such that Mertens' function is zero)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  31. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000567 (Octagonal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  32. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005898 (Centered cube numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  33. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005900 (Octahedral numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  34. ^ a b c Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005385 (Safe primes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  35. ^ "Riksdagens historia" (in Swedish). Parliament of Sweden. Retrieved 29 March 2016.
  36. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000931 (Padovan sequence)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  37. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A080076 (Proth primes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  38. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A062786 (Centered 10-gonal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  39. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005282 (Mian-Chowla sequence)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  40. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000292 (Tetrahedral numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  41. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001608 (Perrin sequence)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  42. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A006562 (Balanced primes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  43. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A003226 (Automorphic numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  44. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A050918 (Woodall primes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  45. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000330 (Square pyramidal numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  46. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A006318 (Large Schröder numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-22.