11th Security Force Assistance Brigade

The 11th Security Force Assistance Brigade is a brigade of the British Army which is intended to train and assist foreign forces. In 2021, under the Future Army changes, the brigade was redesignated, formerly being the 11th Infantry Brigade & HQ South East. Prior to the Army 2020 changes in 2013, the brigade was temporarily activated for deployment to Afghanistan, and before that engaged during the two World Wars.

11th Security Force Assistance Brigade
11th Infantry Brigade & HQ South East
11th Light Brigade
11th Infantry Brigade
11th Brigade
11th Infantry Brigade logo.jpg
Insignia of the brigade
Active1914–1919, 1938–1946
1950–1966, 2009–2010
2014–present
Country United Kingdom
Branch British Army
RoleSecurity force assistance
SizeBrigade
Part of1st (United Kingdom) Division
Brigade HQAldershot Garrison
Engagements
Commanders
Current
commander
Brigadier Benjamin J. Cattermole[1]
Notable
commanders
Kenneth Anderson
Brian Horrocks

First World WarEdit

The 11th Infantry Brigade was formed in 1914 as 11th Brigade was part of the 4th Division.[2] It was one of the British units sent overseas to France on the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914. It was part of the British Expeditionary Force and fought on the Western Front for the next four years.[2]

Second World WarEdit

 
East Surrey Regiment enter the ruins of Cassino, Italy, 18 May 1944

The 11th Infantry Brigade was originally part of the 4th Infantry Division as it was during the First World War, serving with it during the Battle of France and was evacuated from Dunkirk in late May 1940. It remained with the division in the United Kingdom up until 6 June 1942 when it was reassigned to join 78th Infantry Division (commanded by Vivyan Evelegh, a previous commander of the brigade) which was being newly formed to take part in Operation Torch, the Allied landings in French North Africa, as part of the British First Army (commanded by Kenneth Anderson, also a previous commander of the brigade).[3] The brigade landed in North Africa at Algiers in November 1942 and fought with 78th Division throughout the Tunisian campaign which ended with the Axis surrender in May 1943.[4] It then served with 78th Division throughout the campaigns in Sicily and Italy.[5]

StructureEdit

In 1942 the brigade comprised the following units:

CommandersEdit

Commanders included:[9][10]

  • Brigadier-General Aylmer Hunter-Weston (February 1914)
  • Brigadier-General Julian Hasler (26 February 1915)
  • Lieutenant-Colonel F. R. Hicks (27 April 1915 - acting)
  • Brigadier-General Charles Bertie Prowse (29 April 1915)
  • Major W. A. T. B. Somerville (1 July 1916 - acting)
  • Brigadier-General H. C. Rees (3 July 1916)
  • Brigadier-General R. A. Berners (7 December 1916)
  • Lieutenant-Colonel F. A. W. Armitage (15 October 1917 - acting)
  • Brigadier-General T. S. H. Wade (21 October 1917)
  • Brigadier-General W. J. Webb-Bowen (19 September 1918)
  • Brigadier Kenneth Anderson: 1938–1940
  • Brigadier Brian Horrocks: 1940
  • Brigadier John Grover: 1940–1941
  • Brigadier Vyvyan Evelegh: 1941
  • Brigadier Guy Francis Gough: 1941–1942
  • Brigadier Edward Cass: 1942–1943
  • Brigadier Keith Arbuthnott: 1943–1944
  • Brigadier John Alexander Mackenzie: 1944
  • Brigadier Gerald Ernest Thubron: 1944–1945

Post warEdit

In January 1946, following the end of the campaign in Europe, the brigade was dissolved and its units dispersed to other brigades and commands. In 1950, the brigade was reformed in West Germany.

The organisation of the brigade during the 1950s was as follows:[11]

On 1 April 1956, the 4th Infantry Division was reformed in the BAOR, and its brigades: 10th, 11th, and 12th was reformed by conversion of the old 61st Lorried Infantry Brigade based in Minden. In 1958, following the 1957 Defence White Paper, the brigade was redesignated as 11th Infantry Brigade Group and shifted to the 2nd Division. And in 1964, the brigade was transferred to the 1st Division, sitting alongside the 7th Armoured Brigade Group. In February 1961, the brigades were reorganisation, and the infantry brigade groups became organised as equivalents of a modern brigade combat team: signal squadron, armoured regiment, 3 x infantry battalions, field artillery regiment, engineer squadron, and one AAC reconnaissance flight.[17]

The brigade's structure following its conversion to a brigade group was as follows:[18]

In November 1965, the brigades became 'brigades' once again, and dropped their 'brigade group' designations and also dropped their support units. In October 1966, just after the publication of the 1966 Defence White Paper, the 7th Armoured and 11th Infantry brigades experimented with a new brigade organisation with two armoured regiments and two 'mechanised' battalions equipped with the new FV432 armoured personnel carrier. With the increasing availability of the new vehicle, all of the infantry battalions within the BAOR were to become mechanised.[17]

The brigade's structure just before conversion was as follows:[25]

As a result of the above defence white paper and experimentations, the BAOR was completely reorganised with the 11th Infantry Brigade becoming an armoured formation in the end of 1970. The new formation, 11th Armoured Brigade, was reformed, thus ending the infantry lineage.[17][25]

Twenty-first centuryEdit

AfghanistanEdit

On 15th October 2007, Helmand Task Force 11 formed its planning cell at Aldershot Garrison, expanding into 11th Light Brigade in November 2007 for deployment to Afghanistan (Operation Herrick). The brigade was stood up alongside 52nd Infantry Brigade thus providing the Army with two infantry brigades available for deployment to either Afghanistan (Operation Herrick) or Iraq (Operation Telic).[30][31][32]

On 10th October 2009, the brigade deployed to Helmand Province, replacing 19th Light Brigade and would remain until April 2010.[30][33] The brigade's order of battle on deployment to Afghanistan was as follows alongside the formation they had been part of:[30][33][34]

On the brigade's return in April 2010, a total of 650 soldiers from the 12 regiments of the brigade marched through Winchester in Hampshire accompanied by three bands to celebrate their return.[35] Later in June, around 120 soldiers then marched past the Palace of Westminster (Parliament of the United Kingdom).[36][37]

Just a few months after the brigade's return in 2010, the brigade was disbanded and its units returned to their peacetime headquarters.[37]

Army 2020Edit

In 2012, following the Strategic Defence and Security Review 2010, the Army 2020 programme was announced. As part of the mergers, the 2nd (South East) Infantry Brigade, which had regional responsibility for the south east counties (Kent, Surrey, and Sussex), and 145th (South) Brigade, which had regional responsibility for the south-central region (Thames Valley (Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, and Oxfordshire), Hampshire, and the Isle of Wight) were merged to form the new 11th Infantry Brigade and Headquarters South East.[38][39][40]

The brigade's organisation was now as follows by 2015:[38][39][40]

Army 2020 RefineEdit

In 2017, a supplement to the Army 2020 programme was announced entitled the Army 2020 Refine which reversed many of the unit-level changes. In addition to the unit level changes, several of the regional brigades formed under the initial Army 2020 programme were disbanded or reduced to Colonel-level commands. In 2019, a Field Army reorganisation saw these brigades lose their units permanently with the following changes occurring to the former units: Grenadier Guards and Welsh Guards transferred to London District (on rotation) and replaced by the Coldstream Guards and Irish Guards respectively, Royal Gurkha Rifles moved to 16th Air Assault Brigade, The London Regiment transferred to London District, and the 3rd Royal Welsh moved to the 12th Armoured Infantry Brigade.[41][42]

Under the changes, the Coldstream and Irish Guards moved from London District, the 3rd Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment moved from 7th Infantry Brigade, and the 1st and 2nd Battalions, Royal Irish Regiment moved from 160th (Welsh) Brigade.[43]

In 2019 with the brigade completely reorganised, its structure was now as follows by the end of 2021:[41][42][43]

11th Security Force Assistance BrigadeEdit

On 30 November 2021, the Future Soldier changes were announced, and the brigade will transition from an infantry brigade into a security force assistance formation. In late 2021, the brigade was renamed as 11th Security Force Assistance Brigade, dropping its regional commitments, and will reorganise by 2022. The brigade's mission was described as follows:[45]

The 11th Security Force Assistance Brigade draws on personnel and expertise from across the Army, to build the capacity of allied and partner nations. Routinely deployed around the world, Security Force Assistance units contribute to conflict prevention and resilience at an early stage. This activity is underpinned by the Defence's global foundation.

The brigade headquarters will remain in Aldershot, drop its regional commitments, and unit moves will be as follows: Coldstream Guards move to 4th Light Brigade Combat Team (BCT) – formerly 4th Infantry Brigade & HQ North East; 2nd Royal Irish Regiment move to 19th Reserve Brigade – a new formation; 3rd Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment moved to 20th Armoured BCT as mechanised infantry; 1st Royal Irish Regiment moves to 16th Air Assault Brigade as 'light strike reconnaissance infantry'; and the Irish Guards will remain part of the brigade. The following units will join the brigade in 2022: The Black Watch (3rd Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland) from 51st Infantry Brigade; 1st Royal Anglian Regiment from British Forces Cyprus (will join on return from Cyprus in 2023); 3rd The Rifles joins in 2024 from 51st Infantry Brigade; 4th Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment joins from 7th Infantry Brigade; and finally the Outreach and Cultural Support Group will join from 77th Brigade.[46]

The brigade's structure by 2025 will therefore be as follows:[46]

The brigade led a programme to train members of the Armed Forces of Ukraine during the Russo-Ukrainian War as part of Operation Orbital (2015–2022) and Operation Interflex (2022).[50]

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ Mackie, Colin (1 July 2020). "Generals July 2020". gulabin.com. Colin Mackie. Retrieved 10 July 2020. Brigadier Benjamin J. Cattermole (late Royal Scots Dragoon Guards): Commander, 11th Infantry Brigade and HQ South East, June 2020[permanent dead link]
  2. ^ a b Official War Diary of the 11th Infantry Brigade in the 4th Division. Vol. I. France and Flanders. 18 Aug. 1914-14 Feb. 1915. (BL Add. MS. 48355). 1915.
  3. ^ "Campaign for North Africa". Retrieved 20 December 2014.
  4. ^ "The Tunisia Campaign Replay By ER Bickford" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 December 2014. Retrieved 20 December 2014.
  5. ^ "The Italian Campaign". 28 March 2014. Retrieved 20 December 2014.
  6. ^ "2nd Bn Tours & Postings". www.lancs-fusiliers.co.uk.
  7. ^ "Second World War 1939-45: The East Surrey Regiment". Queen's Royal Surreys. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  8. ^ "78 Infantry Division (1942-43)" (PDF). British Military History. Retrieved 31 August 2021.
  9. ^ "11th Infantry Brigade". Orders of Battle. Retrieved 20 December 2014.
  10. ^ Becke, Major A. F. (1935). Order of Battle of Divisions Part 1. The Regular British Divisions. London: HMSO. p. 58. ISBN 1-871167-09-4.
  11. ^ Watson & Rinaldi,p. 42
  12. ^ a b c d "211 Signal Squadron – Royal Corps of Signals". British Army units from 1945 on. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  13. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - 9th Queen's Royal Lancers". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  14. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - Sherwood Foresters". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  15. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - Manchester Regiment". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  16. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - Dorsetshire Regiment". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  17. ^ a b c Watson & Rinaldi, pp. 22–27
  18. ^ Watson & Rinaldi, pp. 53–54
  19. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - 7th Royal Tank Regiment". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  20. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - North Staffordshire Regiment". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  21. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - Highland Light Infantry". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  22. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - Lincolnshire Regiment". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  23. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - 19th Regiment RA". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  24. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - 25 Squadron". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  25. ^ a b Watson & Rinaldi, p. 68
  26. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - Royal Scots Greys". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  27. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - Royal Warwickshire Regiment/Fusiliers". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  28. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - Royal Welch Fusiliers". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  29. ^ "British Army units from 1945 on - Black Watch". british-army-units1945on.co.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  30. ^ a b c "11th Light Brigade". British Army Website. Archived from the original on 9 July 2015. Retrieved 4 May 2022.
  31. ^ "11th Light Brigade – Brigade History". British Army Website. Archived from the original on 9 July 2015. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  32. ^ Mackinlay, pp. 61–62
  33. ^ a b "11 Light Brigade to replace 19 Light Brigade in Afghanistan". Ministry of Defence News. 15 July 2009. Archived from the original on 16 July 2009. Retrieved 4 May 2022.
  34. ^ Mackinlay, p. 135
  35. ^ "Thousands honour 11 Light Brigade in Winchester". GOV.UK. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  36. ^ "Parliament honours soldiers for work in Afghanistan". GOV.UK. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  37. ^ a b "11th Light Brigade". British Army Website. Archived from the original on 9 July 2015. Retrieved 4 May 2022.
  38. ^ a b "Transforming the British Army an Update" (PDF). United Kingdom Parliamentary Publications. Ministry of Defence. July 2013. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  39. ^ a b "Regular Army Basing Matrix by Formation and Unit" (PDF). Army Families Federation. 29 July 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 August 2016. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  40. ^ a b "Regular Army Basing Plan sorted by Unit, Current Location, and Future Location" (PDF). United Kingdom Parliamentary Publications. Ministry of Defence. 5 March 2013. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  41. ^ a b "11th Security Force Assistance Brigade". www.army.mod.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  42. ^ a b "Freedom of Information Act request regarding changes under the Army 2020 Refine down to battalion level" (PDF). United Kingdom Parliamentary Publications. Ministry of Defence. 10 March 2017. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  43. ^ a b "Freedom of Information Act request regarding 1st (UK) Division changes under the Field Army reorganisation" (PDF). What do they know?. Ministry of Defence. 11 September 2019. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  44. ^ "Last week 11th Infantry Brigade - The Charging Bulls said a fond farewell to Brigadier Tom Bateman CBE". Facebook. Army in the South East. 20 July 2020. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  45. ^ "11 Security Force Assistance Brigade". www.army.mod.uk. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  46. ^ a b "Future Soldier Guide" (PDF). British Army Website. British Army. 30 November 2021. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  47. ^ "What is a Typical Morning in the Army? | Infantry Platoon Commander". Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  48. ^ "1 Royal Anglian 'the Vikings' are Moving to Cyprus!". Archived from the original on 12 December 2021. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  49. ^ "Royal Anglian Regiment". Royal Anglian Regiment. 31 March 2021. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  50. ^ "Russia-Ukraine war: UK training programme gets under way". BBC News. 9 July 2022. Retrieved 7 August 2022.

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit