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Visitors to Brazil must obtain a visa from one of the Brazilian diplomatic missions, unless they come from one of the visa-exempt countries.

Contents

Visa policy mapEdit

 
Visa policy of Brazil
  Brazil
  Entry with identity cards possible
  Visa exemption
  Visa must be obtained in advance

Visa exemptionEdit

Holders of ordinary passports of the following jurisdictions do not require a visa to visit Brazil for up to 90 days (unless otherwise noted). An identity document is accepted instead of a passport in some cases.[1][2]

1 - For nationals of Croatia, Finland, France, Ireland, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Spain and the United Kingdom, a stay of up to 90 days. For other European Union citizens, a stay of up to 3 months during a 6-month period.[3]
2 - For a stay of up to 90 days during a 180-day period.
3 - For a stay of up to 30 days.
4 - For a stay of up to 60 days.
ID - May enter with an ID card.

Visits with the visa exemption are limited to the same purposes as those with a visit visa (tourism, business, transit, artistic and sport activities, without payment from Brazilian sources).[92]

Visas are not required for airport transit, from any nationality, as long as the traveler does not leave the international transit area.[92]

Nationals of Spain are specifically required to hold proof of sufficient funds of at least R$170 per day, proof of confirmed hotel accommodation (paid or guaranteed by credit card) or a notary certified invitation letter from a resident of Brazil, and documents required for their next destination. Those traveling on business are exempt from these requirements when holding an original letter from their company, stating the purpose of the visit.[2]

Brazilian citizens who also have another nationality are allowed to enter and leave Brazil with the passport of the other country in combination with any document attesting Brazilian nationality such as a Brazilian identity card or an expired Brazilian passport.[93] If they do not provide such document, they may still enter Brazil as foreigners, subject to the regular requirements and limitations as such.[94][95] However, usually this case is only possible if Brazil does not require a visa from the other nationality. Brazil only issues visas to dual citizens in exceptional circumstances, such as for those who work in foreign government jobs that prohibit the use of a Brazilian passport.[96]

Diplomatic and service category passportsEdit

 
  Brazil
  Visa exemption for diplomatic and service category passports
  Visa free access for diplomatic passports

Holders of diplomatic or service passports of countries exempt from visit visas (listed above) also do not require a visa, except those of Andorra, Australia, Canada, Liechtenstein, Monaco, New Zealand and the United States.

In addition, holders of diplomatic or service passports of Algeria, Angola, Azerbaijan, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, China, Congo, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, India, Ivory Coast, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Moldova, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Qatar, Saint Lucia, São Tomé and Príncipe, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Vietnam and Zambia and of diplomatic passports of Cuba, Iran, Pakistan and Uzbekistan do not require a visa.[1]

Future changesEdit

Brazil has signed visa waiver agreements with the following countries, but they are pending ratification or implementation:

  •   Dominican Republic – 60 days, renewable for up to 120 days per 12-month period, for ordinary passports[97][98]
  •   Moldova – 90 days within any 6-month period for ordinary passports[99][100]
  •   Sierra Leone - 90 days, or the entire period of a mission if accredited to Brazil, for holders of diplomatic, official or service passports[101]

Visa types and requirementsEdit

 
Brazilian visa

Visit visaEdit

The visit visa (VIVIS) allows stays of up to 90 days, for the following purposes:[92]

  • Tourism, including cultural and recreational activities, family visits, attending conferences, volunteer work, research, study and teaching;
  • Business, including meetings, events, reporting, filming, surveying, signing contracts, audits, consulting, airplane and ship crew;
  • Transit;
  • Artistic and sport activities.

Holders of visit visas are not allowed to receive payment from Brazilian sources for the activities during their stay, except for compensation for travel and living expenses and competition prizes.[92]

The visit visa is usually valid for multiple entries during the visa validity period, which is generally one year but may be longer for some nationalities. Each stay is initially limited to 90 days, but an extension may be requested from the Federal Police after arrival. The combined stays must not exceed 180 days per any one-year period.[92]

Temporary visaEdit

Many types of temporary visas (VITEM) are available, for stays longer than 90 days. Certain types of visas allow paid activity, some with restrictions. For some visas based on work or investment, the applicant must obtain authorization from the General Coordination of Immigration (CGIG) before requesting the visa.[92]

All holders of temporary visas intending to stay for more than 90 days are required to register with the Federal Police within 90 days after arrival. After registration, they receive a migration registration card (CRNM) and are granted residency for a certain period. In some cases this period may be "indeterminate" (permanent residency). Temporary residents may later apply to renew their residency period, and in some cases to convert it to permanent residency. Only the time spent as a permanent resident qualifies for naturalization.[92]

Those who will be employed in Brazil must also obtain a Labor and Social Security Booklet (CTPS) from a Regional Superintendency of Labor. A taxpayer number (CPF), obtained from the Department of Federal Revenue, is also required for various transactions.[102]

Summary of temporary visas[103]
VITEM Purpose Paid
activity
CGIG
authorization
Residency Regulations
I Research or teaching employed in Brazil allowed required 2 years, then permanent[a] [104]
not employed in Brazil allowed[b] not required 2 years [105][106]
II Health care not allowed not required 1 year, renewable [107]
III Humanitarian allowed not required 2 years, then permanent[a] [108][109][110][111][112]
IV Study allowed[c] not required 1 year, renewable [107]
V Paid work employed in Brazil allowed required 2 years, then permanent[d] [113][114]
not employed in Brazil allowed[e] in some cases 1 or 2 years[a] [113][114][115][116][117][118]
VI Working holiday allowed not required 1 year [119][120][121]
VII Religious not specified not required 2 years, then permanent [114][122][123]
VIII Volunteer work not allowed not required 1 year [114][122]
IX Investment business not specified required permanent from the start [113][114]
real estate 2 years, then permanent [124]
X Economic, scientific, technological or cultural not yet implemented
XI Family reunification allowed not required same as family member [125]
XII Artistic and sport (not employed in Brazil) allowed[f] required[f] 1 year [114][104]
XIII International agreement allowed not required 2 years, then permanent[a] [126][127][128]
XIV Immigration policy not yet implemented
XV Medical training allowed not required 3 years, renewable [129]
  1. ^ a b c d In some cases, permanent from the start.
  2. ^ Payment must not be from Brazilian sources, except compensation for travel and living expenses and competition prizes.
  3. ^ If compatible with the time required for study as well.
  4. ^ 5 years for professional athletes.
  5. ^ In some cases, payment must not be from Brazilian sources.
  6. ^ a b For sport activities under age 18, the activity must not be paid, and CGIG authorization is not required.

HumanitarianEdit

VITEM III is granted to nationals or stateless residents of countries experiencing serious instability, armed conflict, disaster or violations of human rights.[92] Brazil has designated Haiti for this type of visa. Residency is granted initially for two years, after which the applicant may request permanent residency.[108][109]

Brazil also grants similar visas to people affected by the Syrian Civil War.[110][111][112] Refugees, asylum seekers and stateless people may also request permanent residency after arrival in Brazil (with any visa or waiver).[92]

Working holidayEdit

VITEM VI is a working holiday visa, whose primary purpose must be tourism but paid work is also allowed. This visa is available only by international agreement with the country of nationality.[92] Such agreements are in effect with France[119] and New Zealand,[120] and an agreement with Germany has been signed but not yet ratified.[121][130] These agreements require that the applicant be between 18 and 30 years of age, and allow a stay of up to one year.

InvestmentEdit

VITEM IX is available for three types of investment. One type is for managers and executives whose companies invest at least 600,000 BRL in a Brazilian company, or at least 150,000 BRL and also generate at least 10 new jobs within two years.[113] Another type is for applicants who personally invest at least 500,000 BRL in a Brazilian company, or at least 150,000 BRL in research activities.[114] In both cases, the applicant is granted permanent residency from the start.

The other type of investment requires the personal purchase of urban real estate, for at least 700,000 BRL if located in the North or Northeast region, or at least 1 million BRL if located in another region. In this case, residency is granted initially for two years, after which the applicant may request permanent residency.[124]

Family reunificationEdit

VITEM XI is available for spouses, domestic partners, children, grandchildren, parents, grandparents and dependent siblings of a Brazilian citizen, or of a person holding or applying for Brazilian residency not also based on family reunification, and for legal guardians of a Brazilian citizen. For this visa, residency is granted for the same period as the family member, including permanent residency if applicable.[125]

International agreementEdit

VITEM XIII is available for nationals of countries with residency agreements. Agreements providing permanent residency from the start are in effect with Argentina[126] and Uruguay.[127] A Mercosur agreement is also in effect with Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay and Peru, providing residency initially for two years, after which the applicant may request permanent residency.[128]

Nationals of these countries may also enter Brazil without a visa and request residency after arrival.

Immigration policyEdit

Unilaterally, Brazil also allows nationals of the other neighboring countries that have not ratified the Mercosur residency agreement (Guyana, Suriname and Venezuela) to request residency after arrival in Brazil. In this case, residency is granted initially for two years, after which the applicant may request permanent residency.[131][132]

The VITEM XIV for this purpose has not been implemented, but nationals of these countries may enter Brazil without a visa.

Medical trainingEdit

VITEM XV (VICAM) is available for medical doctors licensed in countries with more than 1.8 doctors per 1,000 people. They are assigned to work in locations with low numbers of doctors in Brazil. The visa allows a stay of up to three years, renewable for three more years.[129]

Former citizensEdit

Although there is no visa specifically for this purpose, former Brazilian citizens may request permanent residency after arrival (with any visa or waiver).[133]

Diplomatic, official and courtesy visasEdit

Brazil issues diplomatic visas (VIDIP) to representatives of foreign governments or international organizations, as well as official visas (VISOF) to their staff. It also issues courtesy visas (VICOR) to notable people for unofficial trips, to family members and domestic workers of holders of diplomatic or official visas, and to artists and athletes for free cultural events.[92]

Accepted travel documentsEdit

For issuing visit and temporary visas, Brazil accepts passports of all entities that have diplomatic relations with it (all member states and observer states of the United Nations, and the Order of Malta), as well as Kosovo and Taiwan. If the applicant does not hold any of these passports, the visa is issued on a laissez-passer.[1]

For issuing diplomatic and official visas, Brazil only accepts passports of entities that have diplomatic relations with it.[1]

Visitor statisticsEdit

Most visitors arriving in Brazil for tourism purposes were from the following countries of nationality:[134]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Entry Visas to Brazil, Ministry of External Relations of Brazil, June 14, 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Country information (visa section)". Timatic. International Air Transport Association (IATA) through Olympic Air. Retrieved 1 April 2017.
  3. ^ Agreement between the European Union and the Federative Republic of Brazil on short-stay visa waiver for holders of ordinary passports, European Union. Nationals of some EU countries are not subject to the 6-month limitation due to separate agreements.
  4. ^ "Table of consular visas valid for Brazil" (in Portuguese). Federal Police of Brazil. Archived from the original on 15 February 2001. Retrieved 9 July 2017.
  5. ^ Agreement for suppression of visa on passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  6. ^ Agreement, by exchange of notes, for suppression of visas on normal passports between the government of the United States of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Austria, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  7. ^ Understanding on waiver of visa for tourists, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  8. ^ Agreement for waiver of visas on passports between the government of the United States of Brazil and the government of Denmark, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  9. ^ Agreement for suppression of visa on normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese), (in Spanish)
  10. ^ Agreement for suppression of visas on diplomatic, special or service and normal passports between the United States of Brazil and the Republic of Finland, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  11. ^ Agreement for suppression of visas on normal passports between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Republic of Colombia, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  12. ^ Agreement for suppression of visas on passports between the United States of Brazil and the Republic of Iceland, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  13. ^ Agreement on suppression of visa on passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  14. ^ Agreement on waiver of visas on passports between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Republic of the Philippines, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  15. ^ Agreement on waiver of visas on passports between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Republic of the Philippines, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  16. ^ Exchange of notes constituting an understanding on suppression of visa on Brazilian normal passports between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Republic of Ecuador, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  17. ^ Agreement for waiver of visas between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the French Republic, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  18. ^ Agreement, by exchange of notes, on visa waiver, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the French Republic, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  19. ^ Agreement, by exchange of notes, for suppression of visa on diplomatic, service and normal passports, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Suriname, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  20. ^ Agreement for waiver of visa on diplomatic, service or normal passport, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  21. ^ Agreement, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Bolivia for suppression of visa on normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  22. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Slovenia on partial waiver of visas, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  23. ^ Agreement, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Costa Rica on visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  24. ^ Agreement between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Republic of South Africa for waiver of visa on diplomatic, official and normal passport, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  25. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Portuguese Republic regarding visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  26. ^ Treaty of friendship, cooperation and consultation between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Portuguese Republic, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  27. ^ Agreement between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Portuguese Republic on facilitation of movement of people, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  28. ^ Agreement by exchange of notes on visa waiver between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  29. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of Malaysia regarding partial waiver of visa requirement, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  30. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Kingdom of Thailand on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  31. ^ Decree no. 3463, Presidency of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  32. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the State of Israel on visa waiver for holders of valid national passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  33. ^ "Table of consular visas valid for Brazil" (in Portuguese). Federal Police of Brazil. Archived from the original on 3 June 2002. Retrieved 9 July 2017.
  34. ^ "Table of consular visas valid for Brazil" (in Portuguese). Federal Police of Brazil. Archived from the original on 8 December 2004. Retrieved 9 July 2017.
  35. ^ Agreement, by exchange of notes, for reciprocal abolition of entry visa requirement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Hungary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  36. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Panama on waiver of visas on normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  37. ^ Decree no. 4235, Presidency of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  38. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Turkey on visa waiver for holders of normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  39. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Tunisia on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  40. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of New Zealand on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  41. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Slovak Republic on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  42. ^ Agreement on facilitation of entry and transit of their nationals in their territories, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  43. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Czech Republic on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  44. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Bulgaria on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  45. ^ Decree no. 5574, Presidency of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  46. ^ Agreement on waiver of visas on normal passports between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Guatemala, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  47. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Croatia on partial visa waiver for holders of normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  48. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of Romania on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  49. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  50. ^ Agreement, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Lithuania on visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  51. ^ Agreement on waiver of visas on normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  52. ^ Agreement between Brazil and Russia for waiver of short-duration visas for nationals of the Federative Republic of Brazil and of the Russian Federation, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  53. ^ Entrance visas in Brazil, Ministry of External Relations of Brazil, 1 April 2011.
  54. ^ Entrance visas in Brazil, Ministry of External Relations of Brazil, 20 July 2011.
  55. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Honduras on partial waiver of visas on normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  56. ^ Brazil suspends agreement and will require visa from Hondurans, O Globo, 3 September 2009. (in Portuguese)
  57. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of Ukraine on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  58. ^ Agreement between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Republic of Guyana on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  59. ^ Agreement between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the European Union on waiver of short-duration visas for holders of normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese) All other EU member states already had separate visa waiver agreements with Brazil.
  60. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Council of Ministers of Bosnia and Herzegovina on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  61. ^ The visa waiver agreement for normal passports between Brazil and Mexico will again enter into force from 16 May, Consulate-General of Brazil in Mexico. (in Spanish)
  62. ^ Agreement for suppression of visas on normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  63. ^ Agreement on waiver of visas on normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  64. ^ Mexico requires visa from Brazil and Ecuador, which respond in the same way, Universo Online, 9 September 2005. (in Portuguese)
  65. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Serbia on visa waiver for their respective nationals, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  66. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Singapore on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  67. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, for establishment of visa waiver for nationals of both countries, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  68. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, for establishment of visa waiver for nationals of both countries, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  69. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Albania, for establishment of visa waiver for nationals of both countries, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  70. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of Antigua and Barbuda on waiver of tourism and business visas, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  71. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of Saint Kitts and Nevis, for establishment of visa waiver for nationals of both countries, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  72. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of Georgia, for establishment of visa waiver for nationals of both countries, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  73. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Commonwealth of Dominica, for establishment of visa waiver for nationals of both countries, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  74. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of Jamaica, for establishment of waiver of short-duration visas for nationals of both countries, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  75. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of Belize, for establishment of visa waiver for nationals of both countries, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  76. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Mongolia on waiver of short-duration visas, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  77. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, on waiver of short-duration visas on normal passports between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Republic of Armenia, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  78. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, on waiver of short-duration visas for nationals of the Federative Republic of Brazil and of Montenegro, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  79. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Macedonia for establishment of visa waiver for nationals of both countries, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  80. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Republic of Kazakhstan, for waiver of short-duration visas for holders of normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  81. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Seychelles on partial visa waiver, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  82. ^ Reciprocal understanding, by exchange of notes, between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Republic of Belarus, on waiver of short-duration visas on normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  83. ^ Agreement, by exchange of notes, between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Fiji on waiver of short-duration visas, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  84. ^ Law no. 13.445 and its regulating decree no. 9.199 combined the tourism and business visas into one type of visit visa. As a result, visa waivers that were limited to tourism were extended to business purposes as well.
  85. ^ Agreement, by exchange of notes, between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Republic of Nicaragua on waiver of tourism and business visas, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  86. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the United Arab Emirates on mutual visa waiver for holders of a normal passport, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  87. ^ Agreement, by exchange of notes, on the bilateral waiver of short-duration visas for holders of normal passports between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Indonesia, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  88. ^ Decree no. 9.731, of 16 March 2019, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  89. ^ U.S., Japan get visa waiver for travel to Brazil Olympics, Reuters, December 30, 2015.
  90. ^ Launch of the Electronic Visitor Visa Program, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil, 21 November 2017.
  91. ^ Brazil e-Visa, VFS Global.
  92. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Decree no. 9.199, of 20 November 2017, Government of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  93. ^ Brazilians with a passport of another country, Federal Police of Brazil, 8 May 2018. (in Portuguese)
  94. ^ Questions about the use of a foreign passport for Brazilians with dual nationality, Federal Police of Brazil, 22 August 2018. (in Portuguese)
  95. ^ Dual citizenship: enter and leave Brazil with a foreign passport, Rome for You, 22 August 2018. (in Portuguese)
  96. ^ Visitor visa, Consulate General of Brazil in Miami.
  97. ^ Agreement between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Dominican Republic on waiver of tourism and business visas, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  98. ^ PDC 1165/2018, Chamber of Deputies of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  99. ^ Agreement between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Republic of Moldova on waiver of short-duration visas for holders of normal passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  100. ^ PDC 935/2018, Chamber of Deputies of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  101. ^ Agreement between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Republic of Sierra Leone on the visa waiver for holders of diplomatic, official or service passports, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  102. ^ Working Holiday Visa (VITEM VI), Embassy of Brazil in Wellington.
  103. ^ Visas to travel to Brazil, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil.
  104. ^ a b Normative resolutions no. 24 and 25, of 20 February 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  105. ^ Normative resolution no. 27, of 10 April 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  106. ^ Normative resolution no. 33, of 12 June 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  107. ^ a b Interministerial rulings no. 7 and 8, of 13 March 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  108. ^ a b Interministerial ruling no. 10, of 6 April 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  109. ^ a b Interministerial ruling no. 17, of 19 November 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  110. ^ a b Normative resolution no. 17, of 20 September 2013, National Committee for Refugees of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  111. ^ a b Normative resolution no. 20, of 21 September 2015, National Committee for Refugees of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  112. ^ a b Normative resolution no. 25, of 14 September 2017, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  113. ^ a b c d Normative resolutions no. 1 to 12, of 1 December 2017, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  114. ^ a b c d e f g Normative resolutions no. 13 to 23, of 12 December 2017, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  115. ^ Normative resolution no. 26, of 20 February 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  116. ^ Normative resolutions no. 29 and 30, of 12 June 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  117. ^ Normative resolution no. 34, of 14 August 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  118. ^ Normative resolution no. 35, of 14 August 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  119. ^ a b Agreement on a working holiday program between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the French Republic, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  120. ^ a b Agreement on a working holiday program between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of New Zealand, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  121. ^ a b Memorandum of understanding between the government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the government of the Federal Republic of Germany on a working holiday program, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  122. ^ a b Normative resolution no. 28, of 10 April 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  123. ^ Normative resolution no. 32, of 14 August 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  124. ^ a b Normative resolution no. 36, of 9 October 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  125. ^ a b Interministerial ruling no. 12, of 13 June 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  126. ^ a b Agreement between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Argentine Republic for granting of permanency to holders of temporary visas or to tourists, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  127. ^ a b Agreement between the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Oriental Republic of Uruguay on permanent residency with the goal of reaching the free movement of people, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  128. ^ a b Reside in Mercosur, Mercosur. (in Portuguese)
  129. ^ a b Interministerial ruling no. 1369, of 8 July 2013, Ministry of Health of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  130. ^ PDL 58/2019, Federal Senate of Brazil. (in Portuguese)
  131. ^ Interministerial ruling no. 9, of 14 March 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  132. ^ Interministerial ruling no. 15, of 27 August 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  133. ^ Interministerial ruling no. 18, of 19 December 2018, Diário Oficial da União. (in Portuguese)
  134. ^ Statistical yearbook of tourism, Ministry of Tourism of Brazil. (in Portuguese)