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The Trinidad and Tobago Regiment is the main ground force element of the Trinidad and Tobago Defence Force. It has approximately 10,000 men and women organized into a Regiment Headquarters (located in Port of Spain) and four battalions. There is also a Volunteer Defence Force that has been renamed the Defence Force Reserves. The regiment has two primary roles; Maintaining the internal security of Trinidad and Tobago and the assistance of local law enforcement.

Trinidad and Tobago Regiment
TTR cap badge.jpg
Cap badge of the Trinidad and Tobago Regiment
Active1962-present
Country Trinidad and Tobago
BranchTrinidad and Tobago Defence Force emblem.svg Trinidad and Tobago Defence Force
Type
  • Infantry
  • Engineers
  • Service
  • Support
RoleLight role (two battalions)
Engineers (one battalion)
Logistic Support (one battalion)
SizeFour battalions ~ 4000
Part ofTrinidad and Tobago Defence Force
Garrison/HQRHQ - Chaguaramas
1st Battalion - St. James
2nd Battalion - Chaguaramas
3rd Battalion - Wallerfield
4th Battalion - Chaguaramas
Motto(s)To Guard and Defend
Commanders
Current
commander
Colonel Darnley Wyke
Commander in ChiefPresident Paula-Mae Weekes
Notable
commanders
Lt Col P Pierce Gould (First Commanding Officer: 1962-1964)
Maj Gen Ralph Brown (1988 - 1991)

As one of the larger military forces in the region, the Trinidad and Tobago Regiment is also one of the main units used in peacekeeping and humanitarian situations from the Caribbean region, most recently in Grenada after Hurricane Ivan.

The Trinidad and Tobago Regiment also provides the bulk of the musicians assigned to the Trinidad and Tobago Defence Force Steel Orchestra, the world's only military steel band.

HistoryEdit

The Trinidad and Tobago Regiment has its origins the late 19th century, though it was directly spawned from the break-up of the Federation of the West Indies in 1962. At that time, the two battalions of the West India Regiment were split and came under the control of the main nations formed by the split. The 1st Battalion became the 1st Battalion, Jamaica Regiment, while the 2nd Battalion was transferred to Trinidad and Tobago to become the 1st Battalion, Trinidad and Tobago Regiment. A second battalion was raised in 1965, but was disbanded in 1972.

Major conflictsEdit

The Trinidad and Tobago Regiment has been involved in two major conflicts.

  • On April 21, 1970, 750 members of the regiment mutinied, under the leadership of Raffique Shah and Rex Lassalle. After a five-day stand-off, the mutineers surrendered. The leadership was court-martialed and Shah, Lasalle and others were jailed (see Black Power Revolution).
  • On July 27, 1990, the Jamaat al Muslimeen, an islamist group with ties to Libya, attempted a coup d'état. They seized control of the Red House (the seat of the Parliament of Trinidad and Tobago) and held the Prime Minister and much of his Cabinet hostage. The Regiment surrounded the insurgents and were able to force them to surrender on August 1.
See: Jamaat al Muslimeen coup attempt
 
Captain (Capt) Roger McLean with the Trinidad and Tobago Defense Force, at the V.C. Bird International Airport, on the island of Antigua in 2002.

International missionsEdit

  • 1983 to 1984 - Trinidad and Tobago contributed troops to the peacekeeping mission after the United States' invasion of Grenada (Operation Urgent Fury). The Trinidad and Tobago Government opposed the military intervention by the United States and did not participate in the invasion. However T&T deployed troops to assist in peacekeeping after the combat mission was completed.[1]
  • 1993 to 1996 - The Trinidad and Tobago Regiment contributed troops to the United Nations Peacekeeping Mission in Haiti (UNMIH) as part of a CARICOM contingent.[2]
  • 2004 to 2005 - After the mass destruction dealt to Grenada by Hurricane Ivan, the Regiment was sent immediately after to help assist the Grenadian government in security, aid distribution and rebuilding of the country.

Other incidentsEdit

  • On 26 April 1988 - A bush fire near Camp Omega, a military compound in Chaguaramas which was used for ammunition storage and infantry training, killed two soldiers and four firefighters when the fire spread to one of the buildings housing the ammunition.[3]

OrganisationEdit

Although it is called the Trinidad & Tobago Regiment, the unit is in fact structured more like a light infantry brigade, with a pair of infantry battalions, plus engineering and logistic support units:

  • 1st Battalion: This is a regular infantry battalion. It is located at Camp Ogden, Long Circular Road, St James.
  • 2nd Battalion: This a regular infantry battalion. Formerly located at Camp Mausica, since then it has been relocated to the Chaguaramas Heliport and is due to be relocated to a new camp in La Romaine, Trinidad and Tobago.
  • 3rd Battalion: This provides engineering support. It is located at Cumuto Barracks, Wallerfield.
  • Support and Services Battalion: This provides logistic and administrative support to the Regiment. It is located at Teteron Barracks, Teteron Bay, Chaguaramas.

The Regiment maintains a base at Camp Omega, also at Chaguaramas, used primarily for specialised training.

EquipmentEdit

Infantry weaponsEdit

NavyEdit

  • Patrol craft (6x)
  • Fast Patrol boats (3x)
  • Interceptor boats (6x)

AircraftEdit

Fixed Wing AircraftEdit

HelicoptersEdit

RanksEdit

The ranks employed by the Trinidad and Tobago Regiment:[4]

Officers
Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer
  Trinidad and Tobago
(Edit)
No equivalent
                 
Major General Brigadier General Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Major Captain 1st Lieutenant Lieutenant Officer Cadet
Enlisted
Equivalent
NATO code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1
  Trinidad and Tobago
(Edit)
          No equivalent     No insignia
Warrant Officer Class 1 Regimental Sergeant Major Warrant Officer Class 2 Staff Sergeant Sergeant Corporal Lance Corporal Private

ReferencesEdit

BibliographyEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Trinidad and Tobago - FOREIGN RELATIONS
  2. ^ UNITED NATIONS MISSION IN HAITI - Facts and Figures
  3. ^ HISTORY OF THE FIRE SERVICE
  4. ^ Močoch, Pavel (10 March 2013). "Trinidad and Tobago Regiment". Uniform Insignia. Retrieved 23 August 2017.

External linksEdit