Timeline of the William Howard Taft presidency

The presidency of William Howard Taft began on March 4, 1909, when William Howard Taft was inaugurated the 27th president of the United States and ended on March 4, 1913.

1909Edit

 
Taft visits New Orleans. October 30, 1909

1910Edit

 
Taft oversees the constriction of the Panama Canal. November 1910.

1911Edit

 
Taft dedicates Lincoln Memorial Hall. November 9, 1911.
  • March 1 - Taft signs the Weeks Act into law.[28]
  • March 4 - Taft calls a special session of Congress to address unresolved issues.[29]
  • March 7 - The United States military mobilizes along the Mexican border as the Mexican Revolution risks spilling over into the United States.
  • March 12 - Richard A. Ballinger resigns as Secretary of the Interior amid scandal.
  • March 13 - Walter L. Fisher takes office as Secretary of the Interior.
  • May 21 - Jacob M. Dickinson is no longer Secretary of War.
  • May 22 - Henry L. Stimson takes office as Secretary of War.
  • May 23 - Taft dedicates the New York Public Library alongside Andrew Carnegie.[30]
  • June 17 - Robert M. La Follette announces his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination.
  • July 14 - Aviator Harry Atwood flies from Boston to the White House, breaking the record for the longest airplane flight.[31]
  • August 4 - Taft meets with Admiral Tōgō Heihachirō of Japan.[32]
  • August 11 - Taft travels to his Summer White House in Beverly, Massachusetts.[33]
  • August 15 - Taft vetoes statehood of Arizona and New Mexico over a provision in the Arizona Constitution allowing judicial recall.[34]
  • September 15 - Taft embarks on a tour across the United States.[35]
  • October 14 - Taft breaks ground on the Panama–Pacific International Exposition that would take place in 1915.[36]
  • October 16 - Two men place dynamite on a railroad in California ahead of Taft's car. Security guard Abe Jenkins discovers the dynamite before the president arrives.[37]
  • October 26 - Taft files an antitrust suit against U.S. Steel.
  • November 2 - Taft inspects the Naval fleet as he receives a 3,690 gun salute.[38]
  • November 9 - Taft dedicates Lincoln Memorial Hall in Hodgenville, Kentucky.[39]
  • November 12 - Taft returns to the White House after 87 days away.[35]
  • December 5 - Taft delivers the 1911 State of the Union Address.[40]

1912Edit

 
Taft signing the Arizona Statehood Bill. February 14, 1912.
 
Taft boarding the USS Arkansas. October 14, 1912.

1913Edit

 
Taft with Woodrow Wilson prior to the latter's inauguration. March 4, 1913.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ John V. Van Cleve and Barry A. Crouch, A Place of Their Own: Creating the Deaf Community in America (Gallaudet University Press, 1989), pp157–158
  2. ^ "Taft at Ball Game; No Hoodoo, He Hopes", New York Times, April 20, 1909
  3. ^ The Panama Gateway (C. Scribner's Sons, 1915), p95
  4. ^ Gorton Carruth, et al., The Encyclopedia of American Facts and Dates (Thomas Y. Crowell, 1962) p416
  5. ^ "Income Tax", Encyclopedia Americana (1919), vol. 14, p744
  6. ^ "Dine On White House Roof", New York Times, June 29, 1909, p1
  7. ^ Feng-Hua Huang, Public Debts in China (Columbia University Press, 1919), p37
  8. ^ "President Greets Family at Beverly", New York Times, August 8, 1909, p1; "Cabinet Officers Off For Vacations", p3
  9. ^ "Taft Opens Tunnel That Diverts River", New York Times, September 24, 1909, p1
  10. ^ Lita Epstein, C.D. Jaco, and Julianne C. Iwersen-Niemann, The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Politics of Oil (Alpha Books, 2003), pp131–132; Samuel P. Hays, Conservation and the Gospel of Efficiency: The Progressive Conservation Movement, 1890–1920 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1999), pp 89–90
  11. ^ "Taft and Diaz Meet; Talk of Friendship", New York Times, October 17, 1909, p1
  12. ^ "Taft Takes Up Case Against Nicaragua" (PDF). The New York Times. November 22, 1909. p. 1. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 7, 2022. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  13. ^ "Taft Breaks With Zelaya" Archived 2022-03-07 at the Wayback Machine, New York Times, December 2, 1909, p1
  14. ^ "December 7, 1909: First Annual Message | Miller Center". millercenter.org. 2016-10-20. Archived from the original on 2021-05-06. Retrieved 2022-03-07.
  15. ^ "Taft Shakes Hands With 5,575 Persons". The New York Times. January 2, 1910. p. 1.
  16. ^ "Railroad Leaders Appeal In Person",, Indianapolis Star, January 4, 1910, p2
  17. ^ "Pinchot Fired By Taft; 'Usefulness Destroyed'". Atlanta Constitution. January 8, 1910. p. 1.
  18. ^ "President Taft Throws First Ball Over Plate", Atlanta Constitution, April 15, 1910, p 13; John Sayle Watterson, The Games Presidents Play: Sports and the Presidency (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006) p 84
  19. ^ "Taft Citizen For Day At Old Home". Indianapolis Star. May 4, 1910. p. 1.
  20. ^ "Signs With Eagle's Feather", New York Times, June 21, 1910, p3
  21. ^ Michael L. Bromley, William Howard Taft and the first Motoring Presidency (McFarland & Co. 2003), pp276–277; "Robert Taft in Auto Runs Over Laborer", New York Times, June 28, 1910, p1
  22. ^ "Taft Preserves Land Under the New Law". The New York Times. July 4, 1910. p. 1.
  23. ^ "Taft Withdraws Big Coal Tracts". The New York Times. July 8, 1910. p. 2.
  24. ^ "Pledge to Panama; Mr. Taft Tells Isthmians We Do Not Seek Annexation", Washington Post, November 17, 1910, p1
  25. ^ "Taft Home Again From Panama Trip", New York Times, November 24, 1910, p8
  26. ^ "Miss Taft's Debut", Washington Post, December 2, 1910, p. 1
  27. ^ "December 6, 1910: Second Annual Message | Miller Center". millercenter.org. 2016-10-20. Archived from the original on 2021-05-06. Retrieved 2022-03-07.
  28. ^ Lewis, Ronald L. (1998). Transforming the Appalachian Countryside: Railroads, Deforestation, and Social Change in West Virginia, 1880-1920. UNC Press Books. p. 288.
  29. ^ "President Calls a Special Session", New York Times, March 5, 1911, p1
  30. ^ "City's $29,000,000 Library Is Opened" Archived 2022-03-07 at the Wayback Machine, New York Times, May 24, 1911
  31. ^ "Taft Greets Atwood after Rainy Flight" Archived 2019-12-15 at the Wayback Machine, New York Times, July 15, 1911
  32. ^ "Admiral Togo Here as Nation's Guest", The New York Times, August 4, 1911, p1
  33. ^ "President Goes to Beverly", The New York Times, August 11, 1911
  34. ^ "President Vetoes the Statehood Bill", The New York Times, August 16, 1911, p1; Steven L. Piott, Giving Voters a Voice: The Origins of the Initiative and Referendum in America (University of Missouri Press, 2003) p145
  35. ^ a b "President Taft Ends His 15,000 Mile Tour", The New York Times, November 12, 1911
  36. ^ "Taft Breaks Earth for Panama Fair". The New York Times. October 15, 1911.
  37. ^ "Dynamite Mines Menaced Taft" Archived 2021-08-31 at the Wayback Machine, New York Times, October 17, 1911
  38. ^ "Taft Reviews Mighty Fleet", New York Times, November 3, 1911
  39. ^ "Lincoln Memorial Dedicated by Taft", New York Times, November 10, 1911
  40. ^ "December 5, 1911: Third Annual Message | Miller Center". millercenter.org. 2016-10-20. Archived from the original on 2021-05-06. Retrieved 2022-03-07.
  41. ^ "Drops Judge Hook; May Name Nagel" Archived 2021-08-31 at the Wayback Machine, New York Times, February 8, 1912
  42. ^ "Taft Orders Citizens to Quit Mexico", Milwaukee Sentinel, March 3, 1912, p. 1
  43. ^ "Troops to Stop All Arms into Mexico", New York Times, March 15, 1912
  44. ^ "Beat Roosevelt in North Dakota". The New York Times, March 20, 1912.
  45. ^ "Makes Woman Bureau Chief – Miss Lathrop, Named by Taft, is First to Head Federal Department", The New York Times, April 18, 1912
  46. ^ "German Naval Visitors Welcomed By the President", New York Times, June 4, 1912
  47. ^ Marc Leepson, Flag: An American Biography (Macmillan, 2006); Image of Whipple Flag Archived 2016-03-03 at the Wayback Machine
  48. ^ Ray Gamache, A History of Sports Highlights: Replayed Plays from Edison to ESPN (McFarland, 2010) p. 47; Important Federal Laws (B.F. Bowen, 1917) p. 653
  49. ^ Vassiliou, Marius (2009). The A to Z of the Petroleum Industry. Scarecrow Press. p. 332.
  50. ^ C. D. Bay-Hansen and Christine Mager Wevik, Power Geopolitics in the Pacific Age: East Asia, the United Nations, the United States and Micronesia at the Edge of the 21st Century, 1991-2001 (First Books, 2011) p. 192
  51. ^ "December 3, 1912: Fourth Annual Message | Miller Center". millercenter.org. 2016-10-20. Archived from the original on 2022-03-03. Retrieved 2022-03-07.
  52. ^ "Pays Toll to Charon— Whitelaw Reid Joins Honored Dead", Los Angeles Times, December 16, 1912, p1
  53. ^ "Street Dynamited as Taft Passes", Milwaukee Sentinel, December 26, 1912, p. 1
  54. ^ "President Formally Accepts Kent Chair", New York Times, January 21, 1913
  55. ^ "Mr. Taft Addresses Senate — Ends Century-Old Tradition in To-Morrow's Memorial Exercises" Archived 2022-03-07 at the Wayback Machine, New York Times, February 7, 1913
  56. ^ Hans P. Vought, The Bully Pulpit And The Melting Pot: American Presidents And The Immigrant, 1897-1933 (Mercer University Press, 2004) p. 93
  57. ^ "Taft Sends Army Close to Mexico", New York Times, February 23, 1913
  58. ^ "More Troops to Galveston", New York Times, February 25, 1913
  59. ^ "Adds to the Cabinet— Taft Signs Labor Department Bill Under Protest", Washington Post, March 5, 1913, p13; The U.S Department of Labor Historical Timeline Archived 2016-01-02 at the Wayback Machine