The Hans India

The Hans India is an Indian English-language daily newspaper published in the states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana as well as in New Delhi.[1] The newspaper was started on 15 July 2011 and belongs to Hyderabad Media House Ltd., which also owns Telugu-language news channel HMTV.[2][3][4] The chief editor is V. Ramu Sarma.[1]

The Hans India
Hans India.png
Cover of The Hans India on 8 August 2016
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatBroadsheet
Owner(s)Hyderabad Media House Ltd.
PublisherK. Hanumantha Rao
EditorV. Ramu Sarma
Founded15 July 2011
LanguageEnglish
HeadquartersHyderabad, India
CirculationAndhra Pradesh, Telangana & New Delhi
WebsiteThe Hans India

The Hans India is a part of Kapil Group, promoted by K. Vaman Rao.[5][4] Kapil Group is a business conglomerate of over 30 companies whose first company, Kapil Chit Funds was started in 1981.[6][4][7]

NameEdit

The name of the newspaper – The Hans India – has been derived from the word 'Hans', meaning swan in Hindi.[3]

K. Ramachandra Murthy, MD and CEO of Hyderabad Media House at the time, noted, “We chose the swan as the symbol for HMTV and also named our paper after this bird as it has the ability to separate milk from water. In the same way, we aim to separate truth from untruth and fact from fiction.” The paper has the tagline 'Free, Frank, and Fearless'.[3]

HistoryEdit

 
Hyderabad Media House office

Hyderabad Media House Ltd. which operated the Telugu news channel HMTV, expanded into print media with the launch of The Hans India, an English-language daily newspaper.[3][8] The newspaper was started on 15 July 2011.[2][4]

K. Ramachandra Murthy, MD and CEO of Hyderabad Media House at the time, mentioned that the programme, 'Andhra Dasa Disa' on HMTV gave them the confidence to venture into print media.[3] PNV Nair, who earlier worked as the Editor at Deccan Chronicle, was the first Editor of Hans India.[3]

Hans India started with its primary focus on Andhra Pradesh (which included Telangana) apart from national and global news. It was launched with five editions from Hyderabad, Visakhapatnam, Vijayawada, Warangal, and Tirupati.[3] Later, it also added editions from Amaravati, Khammam, Kurnool, and New Delhi.[1]

OwnershipEdit

The Hans India is owned by Kapil Group, promoted by K. Vaman Rao.[6][7] Kapil Group is a conglomerate of over 30 companies having presence in over 16 business activities.[5][7]

Kapil Chit Funds, the first company of the group started in 1981 at Karimnagar by K. Vaman Rao, a Chartered Accountant by profession.[6][7] It later diversified into sectors like construction, property management, hospitality, manufacturing, media, energy, agriculture, healthcare, finance, IT.[5][4][7]

ContentEdit

Hans India publishes 20 pages of news, views, reviews, and information about the nation, world, technology, business, sports, and entertainment. At its launch, the newspaper had regular columns by journalists like Kuldip Nayar, M. V. Kamath, Nilotpal Basu, George Verghese, and Pallavi Ghosh.[3]

The paper was launched with two supplements – Hyderabad Hans and Sunday Hans. Hyderabad Hans is a city-centric four-page pullout, printed everyday. Sunday Hans is an eight-page pullout with features about food fests, travel, counseling etc. It has one page each in the main paper dedicated to education, health, and property.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "About Us". The Hans India. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  2. ^ a b "About us". HMTV. Retrieved 21 July 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Prasanna, Sai (1 September 2011). "The Hans India firms base in AP; Delhi edition on the anvil". Exchange4media. Retrieved 25 October 2022.
  4. ^ a b c d e "Kapil Group Businesses". Kapil Group. Retrieved 25 October 2022.
  5. ^ a b c H, Kamalapathi Rao (13 April 2017). "Raids show I-T violation by HMTV boss' chit firm". Deccan Chronicle. Retrieved 25 October 2022.
  6. ^ a b c "Kapil Chits helped Vaman spread his wings wider". Deccan Chronicle. 13 April 2017. Retrieved 25 October 2022 – via PressReader.
  7. ^ a b c d e "About Group". Bijay Finance. Retrieved 25 October 2022.
  8. ^ Ninan, Sevanti (18 September 2013). "Divided state, divided media". Mint. Retrieved 25 October 2022.

External linksEdit