Tatjana Ječmenica

Tatjana Ječmenica-Jevtić (Serbian Cyrillic: Татјана Јечменица-Јевтић; born July 4, 1978) is a Serbian former professional tennis player. Since 2014 she is the captain of Serbia Fed Cup team, which is her second stint at the helm, having previously led the team between 2005–2007.

Tatjana Ječmenica
Татјана Јечменица
Country (sports) Yugoslavia (1993–2003)
 Serbia and Montenegro (2003–2005)
ResidenceNovi Sad, Serbia
Born (1978-07-04) July 4, 1978 (age 41)
Novi Sad, SR Serbia, SFR Yugoslavia
Height1.79 m (5 ft 10 12 in)[1]
Turned pro24 March 1993[1]
Retired2005 (last singles match played in July 1998)
PlaysRight-handed (two-handed backhand)[1]
Prize money$163,876
Singles
Career record106–62
Career titles6 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 72 (24 June 1996)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open1R (1996, 1997)
French Open2R (1996)
Wimbledon1R (1996)
US Open2R (1995)
Doubles
Career record36–33
Career titles3 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 88 (29 July 1996)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open1R (1997)
French Open1R (1996)
Wimbledon1R (1996)
US Open2R (1996)

Ječmenica won six singles and three doubles titles on the ITF tour in her career. On 24 June 1996, she reached her best singles ranking of world No. 72. On 29 July 1996, she peaked at world No. 88 in the doubles rankings.

At Grand Slams her best result was reaching the second round at the US Open in 1995 and at the French Open in 1996.

CareerEdit

Ječmenica started playing tennis in her hometown of Novi Sad at the age of 7[2] and attended the same school and played in the same tennis club as Monica Seles.[3]

JuniorsEdit

In 1993, as a 2nd seed Ječmenica reached the final of Orange Bowl 16s, where she was defeated by 5th seed Stephanie Halsell, who avenged previous years loss to Ječmenica in the quarterfinals of Junior Orange Bowl 14s[3] (Ječmenica was eventually stopped in the semifinals of that tournament).[1] She won Port Washington 14s.[1] In 1994, she lost in the first round of Junior French Open, but won German Junior Open, a Grade 1 event, without losing a set in the tournament.[4]

Junior Grand Slam results - Singles:

Australian Open: –
French Open: 1R (1994)
Wimbledon: –
US Open: –

Junior Grand Slam results - Doubles:

Australian Open: –
French Open: 2R (1994)
Wimbledon: –
US Open: –

ProfessionalEdit

As a very perspective youth she enrolled at the Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy.[5] Her career high in WTA rankings was No. 72 in singles on 24 June 1996 and No. 88 in doubles on 29 July 1996. She won six tournaments in singles and three in doubles on the ITF Circuit. At Grand Slams her best result was reaching the second round at the US Open in 1995 and at the French Open in 1996.

After her longtime coach, Dragan Ćirić Šeki, who coached her since she was 9,[6] died in a car accident on 10 October 1997,[7] Ječmenica didn't play for five months after being unable to find a new coach.[8] She also briefly trained at the Nikola Pilić Tennis Academy before retiring in 1998 at the age of 20.[8]

In 2001, she played her first doubles tournament in over three years and over the next several years would play two more doubles tournaments, reaching one final in 2004, before retiring for good in 2005.[9]

CoachingEdit

Following her playing career, Ječmenica became a tennis coach and in 2004[10] founded a tennis school "Ječmenica" in her hometown of Novi Sad for children aged 5 to 20, with some being ranked in the top 10 in the country.[6]

She served as the captain of Serbia Fed Cup team from 2005 until her resignation on 20 February 2007.[11]

On 5 November 2014, Ječmenica was named the captain of Serbia's Fed Cup team for the second time.[12]

ITF finals: 16 (9–7)Edit

Singles: 9 (6–3)Edit

Legend
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Finals by surface
Hard (1–0)
Clay (5–2)
Grass (0–0)
Carpet (0–1)
Outcome No. Date Category Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Runner–up 1. 4 April 1993 $10,000 Marsa, Malta Clay   Stefania Indemini 2–6, 6–2, 2–6
Runner–up 2. 13 June 1993 $10,000 Murska, Slovenia Clay   Rita Kuti-Kis 2–6, 3–6
Winner 1. 12 September 1993 $10,000 Varna, Bulgaria Clay   Antoaneta Pandjerova 6–2, 3–6, 6–2
Winner 2. 30 January 1994 $10,000 Austin, United States Hard   Tatiana Panova 6–4, 6–7(9–11), 7–6(8–6)
Winner 3. 19 June 1994 $10,000 Maribor, Slovenia Clay   Zdeňka Málková 6–1, 6–7(6–8), 6–3
Winner 4. 3 July 1994 $25,000 Vaihingen, Germany Clay   Svetlana Komleva 6–3, 7–6(7–5)
Runner–up 3. 20 November 1994 $25,000 Bad Gögging, Germany Carpet (i)   Silke Meier 6–4, 4–6, 3–6
Winner 5. 11 June 1995 $25,000 Novi Sad, FR Yugoslavia Clay   Andrea Glass 7–6(6–4), 6–1
Winner 6. 6 August 1995 $25,000 Budapest, Hungary Clay   Barbara Mulej 6–3, 6–2

Doubles: 7 (3–4)Edit

Legend
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Finals by surface
Hard (0–1)
Clay (2–3)
Grass (0–0)
Carpet (1–0)
Outcome No. Date Category Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Runner–up 1. 30 October 1994 $25,000 Poitiers, France Hard   Svetlana Krivencheva   Ludmila Richterová
  Helena Vildová
6–7, 1–6
Winners 1. 20 November 1994 $25,000 Bad Gögging, Germany Carpet (i)   Cătălina Cristea   Kateřina Kroupová
  Jana Pospíšilová
3–6, 6–3, 6–2
Runner–up 2. 10 June 1995 $25,000 Novi Sad, FR Yugoslavia Clay   Antoaneta Pandjerova   Laura Montalvo
  Larissa Schaerer
7–5, 1–6, 1–6
Runner–up 3. 9 July 1995 $25,000 Vaihingen, Germany Clay   Elena Tatarkova   Henrieta Nagyová
  Radka Zrubáková
3–6, 6–7
Winners 2. 6 August 1995 $25,000 Budapest, Hungary Clay   Svetlana Krivencheva   Magdalena Feistel
  Helena Vildová
6–4, 6–3
Winners 3. 17 May 1998 $10,000 Novi Sad, FR Yugoslavia Clay   Dragana Zarić   Antoaneta Pandjerova
  Desislava Topalova
6–2, 7–5
Runner–up 4. 24 July 2004 $10,000 Palić, Serbia and Montenegro Clay   Ana-Maria Zubori   Karolina Jovanović
  Nataša Zorić
1–6, 4–6

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e "Tatyana Jecmenica Corel WTA Tour". corelwtatour.com. Corel WTA Tour. November 1995. Archived from the original on 22 October 1996.
  2. ^ Šoškić, Čedomir (2012). Tenis bez granica 1922–2012 (PDF) (in Serbian). Tennis Federation of Serbia. p. 616. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  3. ^ a b Fialkov, Harvey (26 December 1993). "Halsell Only American Left In Ob Tournament". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  4. ^ Tatjana Ječmenica at the International Tennis Federation – Junior profile
  5. ^ Šoškić, Čedomir (2012). Tenis bez granica 1922–2012 (PDF) (in Serbian). Tennis Federation of Serbia. p. 621. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  6. ^ a b Šoškić, Čedomir (2012). Tenis bez granica 1922–2012 (PDF) (in Serbian). Tennis Federation of Serbia. p. 619. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  7. ^ Šoškić, Čedomir (2012). Tenis bez granica 1922–2012 (PDF) (in Serbian). Tennis Federation of Serbia. p. 503. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  8. ^ a b Šoškić, Čedomir (2012). Tenis bez granica 1922–2012 (PDF) (in Serbian). Tennis Federation of Serbia. p. 620. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  9. ^ Tatjana Ječmenica at the International Tennis Federation
  10. ^ "Nadmudrivanja sa Anom i Jelenom" [Persuasions with Ana and Jelena]. politika.co.yu (in Serbian). Politika a.d. 2007. Archived from the original on 12 June 2007.
  11. ^ "Tatjana Ječmenica više nije selektor" (in Serbian). Mondo. 20 February 2007. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  12. ^ "Ječmenica novi selektor FED kup reprezentacije" (in Serbian). Tennis Federation of Serbia. 5 November 2014. Retrieved 29 November 2017.

External linksEdit