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Contents

Berk and loafEdit

I see nobody's included the famous "berk", or is that too near the knuckle? Neither is using one's "loaf" in the list, or is that too twee? Dieter Simon

Probably no-one thought of them- stick 'em in :-) quercus robur 23:40 Jan 7, 2003 (UTC)

You can add "snake's hiss, piss" if you want.


ok should that list of CRS be moved to wiktionary, or is it ok here? -fonzy


TfD nomination of Template:User CRS-4Edit

Template:User CRS-4 has been nominated for deletion. You are invited to comment on the discussion at Wikipedia:Templates for deletion#Template:user crs-4. Thank you.

But honestly though, how about some modern examples?Edit

I see the last time someone tried to raise this issue it got into a very silly argument. The point is rhyming slang is alive and well - every Brit likes a cup of Rosie, not to mention a Ruby Murray. So how about some modern examples? Or is this all written for septics?

I agree. I think we should have the terms: rabbit, bristols, septic, cobblers, porkies, butchers, and jack jones. just my opinion.

I'm not a fan of modern examples, because firstly we don't preserve the old stuff well enough, then in the Seventies we got some comic additions, which was probably acceptable, but now anyone can make up anything, usually with the desire to be clever or pretentious. E.g. we had farmers, then Chalfonts (from The Two Ronnies?), and now we have Emma Freuds, as though anyone knows or cares who she is. There was never anything wrong with farmers. I wish people wouldn't use the full expression either. It's cobblers, not cobblers' awls, so why Emma Freuds? Emmas isn't going to work though, is it! Forsyte Saga, Lager, anyone? I don't think so!

Casting the net a bit wide?Edit

We've cut down on the examples of commonly used CRS and are insetead getting general UK or CRS painted as local to other regions

  • "arse, the Scots word for buttocks" Arse = UK word for, um, arse.
  • In Republic Of Ireland "Brown bread =>dead" Certainly London/CRS if not near universal.

Rich Farmbrough, 10:23 12 September 2006 (GMT).

BrassEdit

Always thought brass was 'brass door - whore' not what is cited in this page

"Raspberry" used in the USEdit

Anybody willing to find a source that mentions "blow a raspberry"'s use in the United States? That statement comes from an American. BlueCaper (talk), 18 December 2012 (UTC) 02:08

I'll leave it to someone else to determine the best way to do itEdit

But not having Ian Dury mentioned somewhere in the music section is definitely a glaring omission, and a rather eminently notable example. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.224.74.221 (talk) 09:04, 29 November 2018 (UTC)

Top of Rome?Edit

"Top of Rom" (home), doesn't even rhyme; never mind that I've no idea what the "Top" of Rome might refer to. I reckon it's a keystroke error for Pope of Rome, which at least rhymes. Unless anyone objects, I'm going to amend it accordingly.

Nuttyskin (talk) 16:45, 28 April 2019 (UTC)

Don't know what "Top of Rome" means either but it's listed alpahbetically with phrases beigninning with "T" in the existing ref and supported by the other refs I've added. Mutt Lunker (talk) 17:27, 28 April 2019 (UTC)
This has just been reverted; though with my original assertion of a typo (Rom for Rome) included within the reversion.
Now, does anyone have any info as to what Top of Rome is supposed to mean or refer to?
Nuttyskin (talk) 17:27, 28 April 2019 (UTC)
Return to "Rhyming slang" page.