Stordal

Stordal is a former municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It merged with Norddal municipality to establish the new Fjord municipality in 2020. It was part of the Sunnmøre region. The administrative centre of the municipality was the village of Stordal. The historic farm and museum of Ytste Skotet lies along the Storfjorden in the western part of the municipality. Most of the municipality lies on the eastern side of the fjord.

Stordal kommune
View of the Løsetstova in Stordal
View of the Løsetstova in Stordal
Official logo of Stordal kommune
Stordal within Møre og Romsdal
Stordal within Møre og Romsdal
Coordinates: 62°23′24″N 07°06′38″E / 62.39000°N 7.11056°E / 62.39000; 7.11056Coordinates: 62°23′24″N 07°06′38″E / 62.39000°N 7.11056°E / 62.39000; 7.11056
CountryNorway
CountyMøre og Romsdal
DistrictSunnmøre
Established1892-1965
Re-established1 Jan 1977
Disestablished1 Jan 2020
Administrative centreStordal
Government
 • Mayor (2015-2019)Eva Hove (H)
Area
 • Total247.07 km2 (95.39 sq mi)
 • Land243.63 km2 (94.07 sq mi)
 • Water3.44 km2 (1.33 sq mi)  1.4%
Area rank306 in Norway
 *Area at municipal dissolution.
Population
 (2018)
 • Total972
 • Rank396 in Norway
 • Density4/km2 (10/sq mi)
 • Change (10 years)
−0.7%
Demonym(s)Stordaling[1]
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeNO-1526
Official language formNynorsk[2]
Preceded byStranda in 1892
Succeeded byFjord in 2020
Websitestordal.kommune.no

Stordal had relatively good agricultural land, and the main source of income is livestock. Stordal has also been home to furniture production and continues with the industry today.[3]

At the time if its dissolution in 2020, the 247-square-kilometre (95 sq mi) municipality is the 306th largest by area out of the 422 municipalities in Norway. Stordal is the 396th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 972. The municipality's population density is 4 inhabitants per square kilometre (10/sq mi) and its population has decreased by 0.7% over the last decade.[4][5]

General informationEdit

 
View of the Stordal landscape
 
View of the Stordal landscape

Stordal was established as a municipality on 1 January 1892 when it was separated from the large municipality of Stranda (to the southwest). The initial population of the municipality was 850. During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1965, the three neighboring municipalities of Ørskog, Skodje, and Stordal were merged into one large Ørskog municipality. Prior to the merger, there were 1,052 inhabitants in Stordal. The merger, however, was short-lived, and on 1 January 1977 it was reversed and the three municipalities were once again separated.[6]

On 1 January 2020, the municipalities of Stordal and Norddal were merged into the new Fjord Municipality.[7]

NameEdit

The Old Norse form of the name was Stóladalr. The first element is the plural genitive case of stóll which means "chair" and the last element is dalr which means "valley" or "dale". Two mountains around the valley have the name Stolen ("the chair"). Before 1918, the name was written Stordalen.[8]

Coat of armsEdit

The coat of arms was granted on 30 August 1991. The arms show a gold pale on a blue background. The pale symbolises the forestry and furniture manufacturing in the municipality, which traditionally uses a dovetail system to join two pieces of wood. The same symbol also indicates the strong community feeling in the villages.[9]

ChurchesEdit

The Church of Norway had one parish with one church, within the municipality of Stordal. There is also the old church, Rosekyrkja, which is now a museum. It is part of the Austre Sunnmøre prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Møre.

Churches in Stordal
Parish (sokn) Church name Location of the church Year built
Stordal Stordal Church Stordal 1907
Old Stordal Church
(Rosekyrkja)*
Stordal 1789
*The Rosekyrkja has been a museum church since 1908.

GeographyEdit

Stordal municipality is located along the inner Storfjorden in Sunnmøre. The majority of the municipality lies east of the fjord, while a small uninhabited mountainous area on the west side of the fjord is also part of Stordal. Ytste Skotet is a preserved historic farm/museum that is located on the steep mountainsides on the west side of the fjord. Most of the municipality surrounds the Stordalen valley on the east side of the fjord.[3]

The municipalities of Ørskog and Vestnes lie to the north of Stordal, Rauma lies to the east, Norddal and Stranda lie to the south, and Sykkylven lies to the west. The municipality is fairly isolated, with only two road connections to the outside world. Norwegian County Road 650 runs through the municipality from north to south, connecting it to Ørskog Municipality to the north and to Stranda Municipality to the south. Due to the mountainous landscape, the highway goes through the Dyrkorn Tunnel and Stordal Tunnel in the northern part of the municipality. The two tunnels are separated by the small village of Dyrkorn.[3]

GovernmentEdit

All municipalities in Norway, including Stordal, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elect a mayor.[10] The municipality falls under the Sunnmøre District Court and the Frostating Court of Appeal.

Municipal councilEdit

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Stordal is made up of 15 representatives that are elected to four year terms. The party breakdown for the final municipal council was as follows:

Stordal Kommunestyre 2016–2019 [11]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)6
 Progress Party (Framstegspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høgre)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristeleg Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
Total number of members:15
Stordal Kommunestyre 2012–2015 [12]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)4
 Progress Party (Framstegspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høgre)7
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristeleg Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
Total number of members:15
Stordal Kommunestyre 2008–2011 [11]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)2
 Progress Party (Framstegspartiet)2
 Conservative Party (Høgre)7
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristeleg Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
Total number of members:15
Stordal Kommunestyre 2004–2007 [11]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)2
 Progress Party (Framstegspartiet)2
 Conservative Party (Høgre)7
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
Total number of members:15
Stordal Kommunestyre 2000–2003 [11]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)4
 Progress Party (Framstegspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høgre)9
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristeleg Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
Total number of members:19
Stordal Kommunestyre 1996–1999 [13]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)4
 Conservative Party (Høgre)8
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristeleg Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:19
Stordal Kommunestyre 1992–1995 [14]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)5
 Conservative Party (Høgre)7
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:19
Stordal Kommunestyre 1988–1991 [15]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)5
 Conservative Party (Høgre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristeleg Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:19
Stordal Kommunestyre 1984–1987 [16]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høgre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristeleg Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:19
Stordal Kommunestyre 1980–1983 [17]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)4
 Conservative Party (Høgre)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristeleg Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:19
Stordal Kommunestyre 1964 [18]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristeleg Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)6
Total number of members:13
Stordal Heradsstyre 1960–1963 [19]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristeleg Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)5
Total number of members:13
Stordal Heradsstyre 1956–1959 [20]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeidarpartiet)2
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)5
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgarlege Felleslister)6
Total number of members:13
Stordal Heradsstyre 1952–1955 [21]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)12
Total number of members:12
Stordal Heradsstyre 1948–1951 [22]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)12
Total number of members:12
Stordal Heradsstyre 1945–1947 [23]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)12
Total number of members:12
Stordal Heradsstyre 1938–1941* [24]  
Party Name (in Nynorsk) Number of
representatives
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)12
Total number of members:12

Settlers in IcelandEdit

Some people from Stordal settled in Iceland and used Stordal as their last name. The Stordal family is quite known in Iceland but the siblings Sigurður Kristinn Stórdal and Lovísa Stórdal are the most known well-known Stordals currently alive. They are descendants of Egill "Sterki" Stórdal and Ásgerður "Fagra" Stórdal. Egill and his wife became farmers in Stordal which is now known as Skorradalur in Borgarfjörður, Iceland.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. ^ "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  3. ^ a b c Store norske leksikon. "Stordal" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2013-06-21.
  4. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (2018). "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2019-08-18.
  5. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå. "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2019-08-18.
  6. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  7. ^ Siverstøl, Anette (2017-08-09). "Stordal og Norddal blir truleg Fjord kommune". Sunnmørsposten (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2017-10-19.
  8. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1908). Norske gaardnavne: Romsdals amt (in Norwegian) (13 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 134.
  9. ^ "Civic heraldry of Norway - Norske Kommunevåpen". Heraldry of the World. Retrieved 2019-08-18.
  10. ^ Hansen, Tore, ed. (2016-05-12). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 2019-04-06.
  11. ^ a b c d "Table: 04813: Members of the local councils, by party/electoral list at the Municipal Council election (M)" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  12. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2011 - Møre og Romsdal" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway. Retrieved 2019-10-19.
  13. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1995" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1996. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  14. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1991" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1993. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  15. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1987" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1988. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  16. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1983" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1984. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  17. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1979" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1979. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  18. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1963" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1964. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  19. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  20. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  21. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  22. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  23. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  24. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938. Retrieved 2020-04-26.

External linksEdit