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The Second Bruce Ministry was the eighteenth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 14 November 1925 to 29 November 1928.[1]

Nationalist Party of AustraliaAustralian Country Party Coalition

Portfolio Minister
Prime Minister and Minister for External Affairs Rt Hon Stanley Bruce, MP (Nat)
Attorney-General Hon Littleton Groom, KC MP (to 18 December 1925) (Nat)

Hon John Latham, KC MP (from 18 December 1925) (Nat)

Treasurer Rt Hon Dr Earle Page, MP (Country)
Minister for Home and Territories Senator Rt Hon George Pearce (to 18 June 1926) (Nat)

Senator Hon Sir William Glasgow, KCB CMG (18 June 1926 to 2 April 1927) (Nat)

Hon Charles Marr, MP (2 April 1927 to 24 February 1928) (Nat)

Hon Sir Neville Howse, VC, KCMG, MP (from 24 February 1928) (Nat)

Minister for Trade and Customs Hon Herbert Pratten, MP (to 7 May 1928) (Nat)

Rt Hon Stanley Bruce, MP (from 8 May 1928) (Nat)

Minister for Defence Hon Sir Neville Howse, VC, KCMG, MP (to 2 April 1927) (Nat)

Senator Hon Sir William Glasgow, KCB CMG (from 2 April 1927) (Nat)

Minister for Health Hon Sir Neville Howse, VC, KCMG, MP (to 2 April 1927) (Nat)

Rt Hon Stanley Bruce, MP (2 April 1927 to 24 February 1928) (Nat)

Hon Sir Neville Howse, VC, KCMG, MP (from 24 February 1928) (Nat)

Minister for Markets and Migration (to 19 January 1928)

Minister for Markets (from 19 January 1928)

Senator Hon Victor Wilson (to 18 June 1926) (Nat)

Hon Thomas Paterson, MP (from 18 June 1926) (Country)

Minister for Works and Railways Hon William Hill, MP (Country)
Postmaster-General Hon William Gibson, MP (Country)
Vice-President of the Executive Council Hon Llewellyn Atkinson, MP (to 18 June 1926) (Country)

Senator Rt Hon George Pearce (from 18 June 1926) (Nat)

Leader of the Government in the Senate senator Rt Hon George Pearce (Nat)
Honorary Minister Senator Hon Thomas Crawford (Nat)

Hon Charles Marr, MP (16 January 1925 to 2 April 1927; from February 24 1928)

Hon Sir Neville Howse, VC, KCMG, MP (2 April 1927 to 24 February 1928)

Senator Hon Alexander McLachlan (from 29 August 1926)

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "Ministries and Cabinets". Parliamentary Handbook. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 17 September 2010.