Division of Gippsland

The Division of Gippsland is an Australian electoral division in the state of Victoria. The division was proclaimed in 1900, and was one of the original 65 divisions to be contested at the first federal election. It is named for the Gippsland region of eastern Victoria, which in turn is named for Sir George Gipps, Governor of New South Wales 1838–1846. It includes the towns of Bairnsdale, Morwell, Sale and Traralgon.

Gippsland
Australian House of Representatives Division
Division of Gippsland 2019.png
Division of Gippsland in Victoria, as of the 2019 federal election.
Created1901
MPDarren Chester
PartyNational
NamesakeGippsland
Electors110,581 (2019)
Area33,182 km2 (12,811.6 sq mi)
DemographicRural
The Avon River located within Gippsland. The division takes its name from the region the river is located in

HistoryEdit

It is one of two original divisions in Victoria to have never elected a Labor-endorsed member, the other being Kooyong. It has been held by the National Party and its predecessor, the Country Party, since 1922: it is the only seat the party has held continuously since its creation. On its new boundaries, however, it takes in most of the industrial Latrobe Valley.

Prominent former members include Allan McLean, a former Premier of Victoria who served as a minister under George Reid; and Peter Nixon, a senior minister in the Coalition governments from Harold Holt to Malcolm Fraser.

Then-sitting MP Peter McGauran announced his resignation in April 2008, sparking a June 2008 by-election, with the three major parties all contesting the election. The Nationals retained the seat on an increased margin, electing Darren Chester.

MembersEdit

Image Member Party Term Notes
    Allan McLean
(1840–1911)
Protectionist 29 March 1901
12 December 1906
Previously held the Victorian Legislative Assembly seat of Gippsland North. Served as minister under Reid. Lost seat
    George Wise
(1853–1950)
Protectionist 12 December 1906
26 May 1909
Lost seat
  Independent Liberal 26 May 1909 –
31 May 1913
    James Bennett
(1874–1951)
Commonwealth Liberal 31 May 1913
5 September 1914
Lost seat
    George Wise
(1853–1950)
Independent Labor 5 September 1914
17 February 1917
Served as minister under Hughes. Lost seat
  Nationalist 17 February 1917 –
16 December 1922
    Thomas Paterson
(1882–1952)
Country 16 December 1922
7 July 1943
Served as minister under Bruce and Lyons. Retired
    George Bowden
(1888–1962)
Country 21 August 1943
2 November 1961
Retired
    Peter Nixon
(1928–)
Country 9 December 1961
2 May 1975
Served as minister under Holt, McEwen, Gorton, McMahon and Fraser. Retired
  National Country 2 May 1975 –
16 October 1982
  Nationals 16 October 1982 –
4 February 1983
    Peter McGauran
(1955–)
Nationals 5 March 1983
9 April 2008
Served as minister under Howard. Resigned in order to retire from politics
    Darren Chester
(1967–)
Nationals 28 June 2008
present
Served as minister under Turnbull. Incumbent. Currently a minister under Morrison

Election resultsEdit

2019 Australian federal election: Gippsland[1]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
National Darren Chester 52,202 54.00 −1.84
Labor Antoinette Holm 22,426 23.20 +2.99
Shooters, Fishers and Farmers David Snelling 6,872 7.11 +7.11
Greens Deb Foskey 5,835 6.04 −1.79
United Australia Kerri Brewer 4,257 4.40 +4.40
Independent Sonia Buckley 3,043 3.15 +3.15
Conservative National Neville Tickner 2,043 2.11 +2.11
Total formal votes 96,678 94.78 +1.64
Informal votes 5,320 5.22 −1.64
Turnout 101,998 92.27 −0.58
Two-party-preferred result
National Darren Chester 64,456 66.67 −1.54
Labor Antoinette Holm 32,222 33.33 +1.54
National hold Swing −1.54

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gippsland, VIC, Tally Room 2019, Australian Electoral Commission.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 37°35′02″S 147°46′01″E / 37.584°S 147.767°E / -37.584; 147.767