Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio is an archdiocese of the Catholic Church in the United States, and sui juris Latin Church in full communion with the pope of Rome. It encompasses 27,841 square miles (72,110 km2) in the U.S. state of Texas. The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio had a self-reported 2018 population of 796,954,[3] up from 728,001 in 2014.[4] The archdiocese includes the city of San Antonio and the following counties: Val Verde, Edwards, Kerr, Gillespie, Kendall, Comal, Guadalupe, Gonzales, Uvalde, Kinney, Medina, Bexar, Wilson, Karnes, Frio, Atascosa, and the portion of McMullen north of the Nueces River.[5]

Archdiocese of San Antonio

Archidioecesis Sancti Antonii

Arquidiócesis de San Antonio
San Fernando Cathedral.jpg
San Fernando Cathedral
Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio.svg
Location
Country United States
TerritoryCity of San Antonio and the following counties: Val Verde, Edwards, Kerr, Gillespie, Kendall, Comal, Guadalupe, Gonzales, Uvalde, Kinney, Medina, Bexar, Wilson, Karnes, Frio, Atascosa, and McMullen.
Ecclesiastical provinceProvince of San Antonio
Statistics
Area27,841 sq mi (72,110 km2)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2014)
2,458,351
728,001[1] (29.6%)
Parishes139
Information
DenominationCatholic
Sui iuris churchLatin Church
RiteRoman Rite
EstablishedAugust 28, 1874
CathedralSan Fernando Cathedral
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
ArchbishopGustavo García-Siller
Auxiliary BishopsMichael Joseph Boulette[2]
Map
Archdiocese of San Antonio in Texas.jpg
Website
archsa.org

On August 28, 1874, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Galveston was divided and the northern territory was canonically erected by the Holy See as the Roman Catholic Diocese of San Antonio. Originally part of the Ecclesiastical Province of New Orleans, it was subsequently elevated on August 3, 1926, to a metropolitan archdiocese.[6][7]

The archbishop of San Antonio also serves as the metropolitan of the ecclesiastical province of San Antonio with the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio overseeing the following suffragan dioceses: Amarillo, Dallas, El Paso, Fort Worth, Laredo, Lubbock, and San Angelo. All of Texas' dioceses had been suffragan sees under San Antonio until December 2004 when Pope John Paul II created the new Ecclesiastical Province of Galveston-Houston and elevated the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston to a metropolitan see.[8]

HistoryEdit

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio was erected as a diocese on August 28, 1874, under the then Diocese of Galveston.[6] It was elevated to an archdiocese on August 3, 1926.[7]

In 2010, it had 138 parishes, 34 missions and two pastoral centers. In 2018, it reported 139 parishes, 5 hospitals, 3 health care centers, 3 orphanages, 16 nurseries, 10 high schools, and 30 elementary schools..[3] With the appointment of Archbishop José Horacio Gómez as the Coadjutor Archbishop of Los Angeles, its cathedral was considered sede vacante until October 14, 2010.[6] On October 14, 2010, Pope Benedict XVI appointed Gustavo Garcia-Siller as archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio.[9][10]

On January 31, 2019, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio released a list of 56 Catholic clergy who were "credibly accused" of committing acts of sex abuse as early as 1940.[11][12]

BishopsEdit

The following are lists of ordinaries (bishops and archbishops of the diocese) and auxiliary bishops, and their years of service. They are followed by other priests of this diocese who became bishops.

Bishops of San AntonioEdit

  1. Anthony Dominic Ambrose Pellicer (1874–1880)
  2. John Claude Neraz (1881–1894)
  3. John Anthony Forest (1895–1911)
  4. John William Shaw (1911–1918), appointed Archbishop of New Orleans
  5. Arthur Jerome Drossaerts (1918–1926), elevated to Archbishop

Archbishops of San AntonioEdit

  1. Arthur Jerome Drossaerts (1926–1940)
  2. Robert Emmet Lucey (1941–1969)
  3. Francis James Furey (1969–1979)
  4. Patrick Fernández Flores (1979–2004)
  5. José Horacio Gómez (2004–2010), appointed Coadjutor Archbishop and later Archbishop of Los Angeles[13][14]
  6. Gustavo Garcia-Siller, M.Sp.S. (2010–present)

Coadjutor BishopsEdit

Auxiliary BishopsEdit

Other priests of this diocese who became bishopsEdit

EducationEdit

Catholic Universities
High schools
Former high schools

Province of San AntonioEdit

See List of the Catholic bishops of the United States

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.archsa.org/fast_facts.aspx
  2. ^ a b http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2017/01/23/pope_appoints_new_san_antonio_auxiliary_bishop/1287572
  3. ^ a b "Fast Facts | Archdiocese of San Antonio". www.archsa.org. Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio. Archived from the original on 2020-10-23. Retrieved 2020-12-25.
  4. ^ "Fast Facts | Archdiocese of San Antonio". web.archive.org. Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio. 2015-03-07. Retrieved 2020-12-25.
  5. ^ Official Catholic Directory Anno Domini, Part 1. P.J. Kenedy, 2005. p. 1195. Retrieved from Google Books on October 6, 2012. "The San Antonio Archdiocese comprises Atascosa, Bandera, Bexar, Comal, Edwards, Frio, Gillespie, Gonzales, Guadalupe, Karnes, Kendall, Kerr, Kinney, McMullen (that part of McMullen County north of the Nueces River), Medina, Real, Uvalde, Vol Verde and Wilson."
  6. ^ a b c "Archdiocese of San Antonio Archidioecesis Sancti Antonii". Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio. 2010-04-06. Archived from the original on December 25, 2020.
  7. ^ a b "TSHA | San Antonio, Catholic Archdiocese Of". www.tshaonline.org. Retrieved 2020-12-25.
  8. ^ "Largest Provincial Archdiocese in the World to be Split". Catholic News Agency. Retrieved 2020-12-25.
  9. ^ "Pope Names Chicago Auxiliary Bishop Garcia as Archbishop of San Antonio | USCCB". www.usccb.org. October 14, 2010. Archived from the original on August 8, 2020. Retrieved 2020-12-25.
  10. ^ "Archbishop Gustavo Garcia-Siller". San Fernando Cathedral. Archived from the original on 2020-10-01. Retrieved 2020-12-25.
  11. ^ "Archdiocese Of San Antonio Releases Report On Child Sexual Abuse By Clergy". TPR. 2019-01-31. Archived from the original on November 7, 2020. Retrieved 2020-12-25.
  12. ^ Martinez, Sarah. "Archdiocese of San Antonio Report Names Nearly 60 Priests Accused of Sexual Assault Since 1940s". San Antonio Current. Archived from the original on December 12, 2019. Retrieved 2020-12-25.
  13. ^ "Pope Names San Antonio Archbishop José Gomez Coadjutor Archbishop Of Los Angeles". United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. 2010-04-06.
  14. ^ "POPE APPOINTS COADJUTOR ARCHBISHOP FOR LOS ANGELES". Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles. 2010-04-02. Archived from the original on 2010-04-09.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 29°25′29″N 98°29′39″W / 29.4246°N 98.4942°W / 29.4246; -98.4942