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Regions of Thailand

Six-region division system
Four-region division system
Meteorological division system
TAT five-region division system

Thailand is variably divided into different sets of regions, the most notable of which are the six-region grouping used in geographic studies, and the four-region grouping consistent with the Monthon administrative regional grouping system formerly used by the Ministry of Interior. These regions are the largest subdivisions of the country.

In contrast to the administrative divisions of the provinces of Thailand, the regions no longer have an administrative character, but are used for geographical, statistical, geological, meteorological, or touristic purposes.

Contents

Grouping systemsEdit

A six-region system is commonly used for geographical and scientific purposes. This system dates to 1935.[1] It was formalised in 1977 by the National Geographical Committee, which was appointed by the National Research Council. It divides the country into the following regions:

The four-region system, used in some administrative and statistical contexts, and also as a loose cultural grouping, includes the western and eastern regions within the central region, while grouping the provinces of Sukhothai, Phitsanulok, Phichit, Kamphaeng Phet, Phetchabun, Nakhon Sawan, and Uthai Thani in the northern region. This is also the regional system most commonly used on national television, when discussing the weather or regional events. It divides the country into the following regions:

The Thai Meteorological Department divides the country into six regions for meteorological purposes.[2] It differs from the four-region system in that the east is regarded as a separate region, the south is divided into east and west coasts, and Nakhon Sawan and Uthai Thani are grouped in the central region.

The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) formerly used a five region system. It now divides the country into six regions for tourism purposes.[3]

ComparisonEdit

Provinces Six-region (geographical) Four-region (political) Six-region (meteorological) Five-region (tourism) (obsolete)
Amnat Charoen, Bueng Kan, Buriram, Chaiyaphum, Kalasin, Khon Kaen, Loei, Maha Sarakham, Mukdahan, Nakhon Phanom, Nakhon Ratchasima, Nong Bua Lamphu, Nong Khai, Roi Et, Sakon Nakhon, Sisaket, Surin, Ubon Ratchathani, Udon Thani, Yasothon Northeastern Northeastern Northeastern Northeastern
Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, Lampang, Lamphun, Mae Hong Son, Nan, Phayao, Phrae, Uttaradit North Northern Northern Northern
Tak Western
Sukhothai, Phitsanulok, Phichit, Kamphaeng Phet, Phetchabun Central
Nakhon Sawan, Uthai Thani Central
Ang Thong, Chainat, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, Bangkok, Lopburi, Nakhon Pathom, Nonthaburi, Pathum Thani, Samut Prakan, Samut Sakhon, Samut Songkhram, Saraburi, Sing Buri, Suphan Buri Central Central
Nakhon Nayok Eastern
Chachoengsao, Chanthaburi, Chonburi, Prachin Buri, Rayong, Sa Kaeo, Trat Eastern Eastern
Kanchanaburi, Ratchaburi Western Central Central
Phetchaburi, Prachuap Khiri Khan Southern, east coast
Chumphon, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Narathiwat, Pattani, Phatthalung, Songkhla, Surat Thani, Yala Southern Southern Southern
Krabi, Phang Nga, Phuket, Ranong, Satun, Trang Southern, west coast

Regional economic disparitiesEdit

Thailand's economic activities are concentrated in Bangkok and the central region. In 2013, the central region's gross regional product (GRP) contributed 40.9 percent to Thailand's GDP. Other regions accounted for 10.9 percent (northeastern); 8.8 percent (northern); and 8.6 percent (southern). GRP per capita varied. The average GRP per capita of the central region was 280,734 baht, while that of the northeastern region was 74,532 baht.[4]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Mundus. Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft. 1981. p. 65. Retrieved 17 January 2012.
  2. ^ "Home; Weather". Thai Meteorlogical Department. Retrieved 4 October 2018.
  3. ^ "Thailand travel guide, destinations and maps". Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT). Retrieved 2018-10-05.
  4. ^ "The Twelfth National Economic and Social Development Plan, 2017–2021". Office of the National Economic and Social Development Board (NESDB). pp. 58–59. Retrieved 10 October 2017.